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9/6/2013
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Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?

Microsoft's next Surface Pro will include better battery life and could launch alongside Windows 8.1, according to recent leaks.

10 Tablet Battery Tips: More Power
10 Tablet Battery Tips: More Power
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For all the swagger with which tech companies defend their products and strategies, the most successful players are often those that are quick to abandon failed tactics. Apple co-founder Steve Jobs famously dismissed the viability of smaller tablets, for example, but the company still released the iPad Mini, and is much richer for it.

So far, Microsoft's Surface Pro has exemplified failed tactics. What features will the company change to make its next Pro tablet more successful? Based on recent reports, not a lot. But the tweaks Microsoft is evidently making might still be enough to turn things around.

The next Surface Pro will reportedly run on Intel's fourth-generation Haswell Core i5 processer. The energy-efficient chips should address complaints about the current model's battery life. Today's Surface Pro shuts down after four to five hours, but the new model is expected to keep running for around seven hours. Details about the new Surface Pro were first reported by the website NeoWin and have since been corroborated by Windows blogger Paul Thurrott.

Microsoft will also reportedly release a new keyboard accessory called the Power Cover that will extend the device's battery life for several more hours. Microsoft hinted seven months ago that such an accessory was in the works.

[ Will the Surface be further challenged by a new breed of mobile devices? Read Tablet Sales Face Growing Threat From Smartwatches, Phablets. ]

According to Thurrott's sources, the Power Cover will be released before the end of the year but after the launch of new Surface devices. This timing suggests Microsoft will announce new tablets around the same time it releases Windows 8.1, which has already been released to manufacturers and will become generally available on October 18.

The reports also indicate the new Surface Pro will include 8 GB of RAM, twice as much as the current model, and a "refined" kickstand that, unlike today's version, can provide more than one viewing angle. A Microsoft patent, published September 5 but filed in October 2012, supports that the company plans to implement more versatile kickstands in future devices.

Aside from these enhancements, which are important but largely iterative and expected, the next device will allegedly maintain the current model's basic design, albeit with a slightly slimmer and lighter form factor. Existing accessories, such as the Type Cover and Touch Cover keyboards, should work on the next version.

Even if the device is a relatively modest upgrade, the strategy could make a certain amount of sense. The current Surface Pro, despite its modest sales, isn't a useless device so much as an interesting product marred by several distinct shortcomings. For some users, the expected battery life improvements alone might make a difference.

Still, it remains to be seen if the next Surface Pro can appeal to more than niche users. The new model's battery life will be an improvement, for instance, but without the Power Cover (for which Microsoft will almost certainly charge an extra $100 to $200) the device's longevity will still fall short of other tablets as well as Haswell-based laptops such as the MacBook Air.

The modified kickstand is another unknown. In an interview, Gartner analyst Carolina Milanesi said enterprises consider the Surface Pro the most viable hybrid device but that not everyone likes the design of the hardware. She stated many users would prefer something more like a hard clamshell so the device is easier to use on one's lap in its notebook configuration. It's hard to predict if the kickstand will address this ergonomic issue. The Power Cover could also help; it is expected to be twice as heavy and thick as the current Type Cover, which might mean it's rigid enough to provide a firm base.

The Surface Pro follow-up will also reportedly lack LTE support. Such an omission is understandable if you think of the device as a laptop, but if you consider the Surface a tablet, the missing LTE support somewhat compromises the device's mobility.

Cost is another factor. Microsoft recently announced that the current Surface Pro's discounted price, which starts at $799 for the base 64-GB model without a keyboard, would be permanent. If the next device comes in at the same price, it could be a tough sell, especially since many users will resent being forced to buy a Power Cover simply to make the device as fully usable as competing options.

There's also Windows 8.1 to consider. The current edition of the OS has arguably inspired more critics than fans -- and if the updated version isn't meaningfully better, the next Surface Pro could still face challenges regardless of its price, specs or design. Based on a recent Forrester study, many users are interested in tablets with laptop-like functionality -- but they're more interested in using the tablet whose interface they most enjoy. The implication for the updated Surface Pro? If Windows 8.1 doesn't engage users, the device's hybrid qualities might not matter.

Milanesi expects holiday sales to be dominated by lower-end tablets and that the market for laptop-tablet hybrids will take off in 2014. She noted that some enterprise customers are interested in these 2-in-1 models because they allow IT to manage fewer devices than if employees carried separate laptops and tablets. For precisely this reason, some businesses and institutions, such as the DEA, have already been experimenting with Windows 8 devices.

In addition to the new Surface Pro, Microsoft is also expected to announce at least one new Surface model that runs Windows RT. The company has alluded to the new devices only in opaque terms; the only substantive official information has come from Nvidia CEO Jen-Hsun Huang, who confirmed that his company is working with Microsoft on a Surface RT follow-up. But numerous reports indicate that a second, smaller Surface RT model is also in the works. Nokia, whose device and services business Microsoft recently purchased, is also reportedly readying a Windows RT tablet with a detachable keyboard.

While the merits of the new tablets are still up in the air, it's clear that Microsoft, despite its recent struggles, is continuing to rush forward with its new "devices and services" strategy. Outgoing Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has suggested Windows 8's launch was marred by a lack of touch-optimized hardware. This year, the company should face no such dilemma.

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melgross
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melgross,
User Rank: Ninja
9/7/2013 | 4:58:13 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Well, I wouldn't describe Pro sales as modest. More like minuscule. Even IDC, a Microsoft friendly shop, estimated that last quarter, RT and Pro shipments together totaled 300 thousand. That's not "modest", it's a disaster!

I know one friend that bought a Pro, and I think it's a reason why it's been a failure so far. This guy is an enterprise salesman for IBM. He bought the Pro, and was practically jumping up and down about how this was really an Ultrabook. Yet, when I asked him to show me what was so great about it to him, all he could do, with real enthusiasm, was to open Word, and show me how he scribbled on pages with the stylus. He was amazed, and impressed that he could do that, and save it for later.

When I took my iPad out and did the same thing in Pages. We was confused. Apparently, he thought that it could only be done in Word in a Microsoft tablet. You would think that a guy like him would be more in touch with these things, but it's not true. At this point, his enthusiasm with this $1,200 device has waned.

So if battery life is better, but still not great, and it weighs a few ounces less, and has a kickstand that still doesn't let you use it on your lap with a typing cover, then people will still avoid it, even if it is $100 cheaper. The problem is that the entire concept of Win 8 on a tablet is a losing idea. No matter what claims are made, or how writers torturously write around it, the Desktop and its software will never work properly on a small screen with a stylus, and especially not with a finger.

As they say; " Put a fork in it, it's done."
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
9/9/2013 | 9:30:24 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Your friend with the Surface Pro can connect to his office network, use Word, Excel, Outlook, etc. just as he can at his desktop or notebook. He has access to all his server applications just as in the office. YOU cannot do that with your iPad. If you think using a stylus in Word or Pages is some app feature worthy of a tablet purchase, I feel sorry for your decision making process. Our CFO uses a Surface Pro now, as does the IT Director, when out of the office for days, with no loss of productivity or system availability.
Bob124
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Bob124,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/9/2013 | 3:23:39 AM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Microsoft just does not get it, they keep trying to make the tablet into a laptop and the laptop into a tablet. They have different functions and usability. I laugh when I see people in meetings using the iPads or Surface with a keyboard.. Not what it was designed for... A House boat is neither a great house or a great boat.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/9/2013 | 5:37:37 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
I see lots of iPad users with keyboards. The real issue is any of us assuming what folks want. Didn't Jobs say that folks don't know what they want until you show it to them?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
9/9/2013 | 8:15:43 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Forrester data shows a fairly even split between people who want laptop-like tablets, people who want tablets that use keyboard docks, and people who want tablets that have nothing to do with physical keyboards. To me, that's a sign that the use cases, form factors and technology are still in flux, with a lot of people caught between features that sounds good in theory and features that actually work well in practice. This would explain why the first round of Windows 8 tablets struggled-- lots of functionality, sure, but also lots of compromise. As Bob124 aptly said, a house boat is neither a great house nor a great boat.

Then again, it's also possible that use cases around tablets are fragmenting. The tablet form factor might become ubiquitous, but all the variations (detachables, hybrids, bigger screens, smaller screens, etc.) might be confined to niche pockets of the market. This scenario would at least allow Windows 8 to become widely used across a wide variety of devices (a la Android), but it wouldn't help any single OEM to produce a world-conquering device (like an iPad).

But it looks likely that Microsoft will have a new Surface to show us in just a few weeks, so we'll see what they come up with.
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
9/9/2013 | 9:33:18 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
I know one thing, an iPad is not the answer for my work needs. It works for my personal use however.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
9/9/2013 | 10:48:21 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Yep, and you're not the only one. I think that's one reason analysts think convertibles are going to become popular in 2014. All those old computers are going to die after a while, and not everyone can just replace theirs with a tablet. I wouldn't be surprised if form factors like the Lenovo Yoga's become more popular. But again, I'm also skeptical that any single form factor will become ubiquitous. Some might just carve out larger niches than others.
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
9/9/2013 | 9:32:10 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
So, are iPad users with keyboards something to laugh at...I guess so now since you decreed it. You also do not know enough about boats; it depends upon your primary needs.
Bob124
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Bob124,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/10/2013 | 1:07:07 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
wht - Tablet users in general, who want to productive doing PC work, will not be as productive on a tablet. Answering an email is fine, or even surfing the net, if that is your job - is okay on a tablet. But to be productive - most people will remote into their desktop or virtual desktop for a better user experience. The device (phone or tablet), is then a pass thru device.
my 2 cents.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/10/2013 | 2:22:00 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
That doesn't make sense. If the tablet is a pass-thru device, are we affirming the HUMAN interfaces it offers (either natively or through add-ons) is good enough for "real" work? Does that then mean the native software is the primary issue? If software is the issue, why isn't Microsoft's product flying off the shelf?

Most folks claim using desktop UIs on a tablet is not productive. If we assume that's true, why would remoting to a desktop through a tablet be more productive than using a desktop on a tablet (i.e. what Win 8 Pro + Surface Pro offers)?
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/9/2013 | 6:39:25 AM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
VistaBob 8 strategy was worse than Waterloo plus Stalingrad combined.

Ruin your actual successful product, pivotal as strategic advantage for all other branches of your business, hosing features that characterize it for BILLIONS USERS, in the hope next product will sell enough quickly to make up for the loss.

Well it did not worked (no surprise to me and most of analysts).

People are using PC less and for less, sales are free-falling, OEM are moving money to produce and advertise Android units, developers are shunning the Micro(scopic)Store, no short-medium-long term plan longer invests on MS for small-medium-large companies, consumers are dissing the pitiful new "user experience" MS tries to force to the market, Ballmer is now in tar and feathers...

MS needs to kill tiles and Store and Surface as fast as it can.

Tiles, because people will not buy such a pitiful disaster of two schizophrenic UIs badly stitched together like Frankenstein.

Store, because Win32 developers does not want the store model, and if they are forced to chose, they will not chose the underdog one.

Surface, because MS monopoly was born and sustained buy OEM, if they go, Windows will go.

Firing Ballmer by torches and pitchforks was only the first step for a sustainable future for MS.
wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
9/9/2013 | 9:34:17 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Don't trip on your way to the graveyard.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/10/2013 | 6:28:56 AM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Oh yeah Ballmer, you now know how to post on Disqus, now back to sending resumees... :)
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2013 | 12:44:31 AM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Balmer posting resumes? Is that what you meant? If so, until he becomes bored to tears with retirement, he's not fretting over finding a new job.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 5:00:13 AM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
money is a strange beast, even when it is enough, even when it is a lot, it is never ever too much.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2013 | 7:18:23 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
That only applies to pro sport's figures that spend like they are always going to get a $10M signing bonus and don't get injured for the next 10 years.

I'm not sure it's possible for Balmer to spend beyond his means. It's a bit like Richard Pryor in Brewster's Millions.

Unless Microsoft goes bankrupt, his stock dividends alone are probably more than any of us could even imagine spending. When you spend that kind of money, what you buy retains its value or even increases in value.

Unless he decided to blow billions running for president, I'm not sure it's possible for him to spend all of his money. Even spending a few billion in politics barely scratches his net worth. When Microsoft's stock rose after announcing his retirement, someone reported his net worth increased billions and billions.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/13/2013 | 4:40:48 AM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
if he bet the company on vistabob, i expect any insane betting in his future...
and, with intel delaying 64 bit slabs to q1 2014, bye bye xmas, says w8.1, so don't speak the "b" world too loudly!
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
9/13/2013 | 3:54:45 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
I thought the current slabs were 64-bits. I thought loading them with 32-bit software was a Win 8 limitation that's supposed to be fixed in Q1 2014. Aren't the Atoms 64-bit? I thought they just don't work with Win64 because of some Win issue. Could be wrong but I thought that's what I read.
Palpatine
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Palpatine,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/20/2013 | 4:45:17 AM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
yes, i'm talking of next gen intel delay past xmas... good move wintel, everyone will wait :)
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
9/9/2013 | 9:06:34 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
Do you think they have a real chance at a comeback?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
9/9/2013 | 9:20:07 PM
re: Microsoft's Next Surface Pro: Comeback Kid?
The countdown has begun; Microsoft has summoned the media to New York City for a September 23 Surface-related event. If they reveal something along the lines of what's described in this article, I wonder how many people will be eager to buy.
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