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7/29/2014
01:01 PM
Thomas Claburn
Thomas Claburn
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Rise Of The Robots: Up From The Factory Floor

Join San Diego State University professor Robert Judge and InformationWeek editor-at-large Thomas Claburn for a live discussion of the increasing interest in robots and automation.

If Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has his way, there will be a robot Olympics in 2020. Not long ago, the idea would be laughable. But all around the world, people are holding competitions to assess the capabilities of robots. Robots are here, and they're beginning to do meaningful labor beyond assembly lines.

Between last October and May of this year, the number of robots ferrying goods about Amazon.com's warehouses grew from about 1,300 to more than 10,000 -- an eightfold increase. During this period, Google bought at least eight companies developing robot-related technology, deepening its commitment to automated systems that already power its self-driving cars.

The consulting firm McKinsey issued a report last year predicting that knowledge work automaton tools and systems could have $5.2 trillion to $6.7 trillion of economic impact annually by 2025. The report calculates the potential productivity gain of automation as "equivalent to the output of 75 million to 90 million full-time workers in advanced economies and 35 million to 50 million full-time workers in developing countries." Whether such automated work takes the form of additional productivity or the replacement of human labor remains to be seen.

In an effort to capture a portion of that revenue, the UK government introduced its robotics and autonomous systems (RAS) strategy in July in conjunction with a $257 million funding commitment to advance UK robotics research.

Robots and automation are redefining labor and productivity, for better or worse. Tune in Tuesday, July 29 at 2:00 p.m. EST/11:00 a.m. PST to hear InformationWeek editor Thomas Claburn interview San Diego State University professor Robert Judge about how changing technology has made mobile robotic systems more broadly useful for business and how automation will take over more and more tasks done by knowledge workers.

Register here to listen live through Informationweek.com, and bring your own questions, which you can ask via text chat. You also can catch the archive version. (On the registration page, if you're already a registered member of InformationWeek.com, just click the login link at the top of the form. Once registered, if the audio player fails to load, try refreshing your browser.)

Thomas Claburn has been writing about business and technology since 1996, for publications such as New Architect, PC Computing, InformationWeek, Salon, Wired, and Ziff Davis Smart Business. Before that, he worked in film and television, having earned a not particularly useful ... View Full Bio
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nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 5:28:45 PM
Re: better late than never
@Chris thank you very much for the link. I have gone through and found it very informative but feels that going live might have been the best option. So hopefully I will be available for next shows on the line :)
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 5:26:56 PM
Re: this was expected
@Sachinee I agree with you but let me ask you at what cost. Do you feel that we are so much lazy that we cannot do things and asking robots to do the job for us. I believe with the success of robots we are going to but large number of people below the poverty lines as robots will definitey intially take the positions of less previliged class. ?
SachinEE
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SachinEE,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 1:02:06 PM
Re: this was expected
The 21st century is the time period where technology has made the widest stride but this fact might be different in the future. We have all sorts of technological stuff that can do work for us hence we have just become more lazy and with this getting worse, we do need something that can work for us at a cheaper cost but maintain a high production and robots are the best answer. I am quite certain that in a few years, the robots we see in movies will be walking in our streets for real.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/30/2014 | 10:19:41 AM
Re: better late than never
It is avaiable for archived listening -- same URL, and you can read the chat that we had after the broadcast: 

http://www.informationweek.com/radio.asp?webinar_id=110
nomii
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50%
nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 7:03:40 AM
better late than never
I really missed the opportunity but hope that it will be available in archive. It is something worth to have knowledge about and hope fully more shows on the subject will be conducted soon.
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