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8/22/2012
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Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus

Galaxy Note 10.1's defining feature, the S Pen stylus, isn't popular with a majority of young tablet users, who call the accessory "outdated," survey says.

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More than half of respondents to a poll said that they wouldn't buy a tablet that came with a stylus. Why not? The stylus is a "completely unnecessary" accessory that makes a tablet "look outdated."

The poll, conducted by CouponCodes4u.com, researched tablets and how they are used by some 2,000 Americans aged 21 to 35. The goal of the study was to gauge opinions on the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 and whether the stylus would enhance the tablet experience or hinder it.

All of the respondents were current tablet owners: 61% claimed to have an iPad, 33% claimed to have an Android-based tablet, and (shockingly) 4% claimed to have a Research In Motion PlayBook. (What, no HP TouchPads out there?)

When polled about their feelings on tablets that come with a stylus, 53% of respondents said they would not buy a tablet that comes with one. But still 41% said they would, and the remaining 6% said it depended on whether or not the stylus was vital to that particular tablet's user experience.

[ Next month should be exciting for the wireless world. Read Apple, Motorola, Nokia Plan September Fireworks. ]

Digging deeper into consumers' feelings about the stylus, CouponCodes4u.com found that 67% of those respondents who were against the stylus called it "completely unnecessary." Worse, 31% said the stylus made the tablet "look outdated." Last, 22% voiced concerns that they would lose the stylus altogether.

On the flip side, the 41% of users who said they would buy a tablet with a stylus believed that it would be of use for text input (67%); liked the idea of imitating pen and paper (12%); and believed it could help reduce repetitive strain Injuries.

There's some bad news for the Galaxy Note 10.1. According to the poll, only 31% of current Android tablet users said they would buy it.

"Following the release of the Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1, with added stylus pen, we were intrigued to discover what consumers thought of this latest addition to the tablet market," said Mark Pearson, Chairman of CouponCodes4u.com. "Not surprisingly, the majority of Americans were turned off by the idea and even went as far as to say they were completely unnecessary."

It wouldn't be fair to Samsung, however, if we didn't point out at least one flaw in the poll. The age range of those polled is far too narrow. CouponCodes4U.com conducted this survey in the 21 to 35 age bracket. More, shall we say, experienced tech users might feel differently about the stylus. I would like to see an expanded poll on this topic that includes users aged 21 to 59.

What do you think about the stylus? Is it "unnecessary"? A "turn off"? Or are you intrigued by the idea of using one on a tablet?

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CakeCrumb
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CakeCrumb,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/5/2012 | 5:45:32 AM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
I am currently trying to get another ThinkPad X#t series tablet (Windows based tablet). It was another one competing with the Fujitsu Lifebooks and the HP Elitebook (all of them sold WAY before Apple "invented" the tablet). All have handwriting recognition. and you can swap batteries.

I lost my Lenovo because I change jobs a while back and it was given to me by my employer and of course once I quit I had to give it back (go figure). In any case, compare to any of the current tablets, even the X41t (the really old version) kicks the butt out of any of the newer thin tablets except for weight. I could swap batteries and pretty much run for ever (as I charge the other batteries) and batteries would last around 6-7 hours (with my workload). So NO, the iPads, Android, Blackberry, webOS tablets are TOYS compare to Windows base computers. The computing power of even your old Fujitsu does not compare to the latest iPad since it is much more powerful. What they have improve is weight and screen resolution. But you can get a full out Windows 7 tablet that can run 100x faster than the best toy tablet can connect to almost ANYTHING. Yes you can attach a 3G, 4G card to it and there are options to run the tablet up to 16 hours. The difference is weight. You can get them with 1TB of hard drive space (plus attach as many USB drives as you want), they can have 8gb of RAM (as oppose to 2gb for the newer Android tablets or 1GB for the newer 10" iPad since the mini still has only 512mb). So the Note 10 is not a better replacement to the Fucjitsu just lighter.
CakeCrumb
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CakeCrumb,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/5/2012 | 3:42:55 AM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
Outdated? So finger painting is the HI-TECH way of doing things. I see.
So do you carry a jar of ink and sign with your high tech finger?
I imagine, when people have an idea they take out their finger and jot down their stuff in the hi-tech napkin.
I know artist use their finger when they paint.
Architects use their finger when they design.
Scientist will write their formulas with their fingers.

Oh, I know people are becoming so dumb that they never need to write a formula or draw any symbols or have to do any rough sketches of anything.

So if you look at this logic then the next literary award would start with.
lol dnt b dum im betr dan u
;-P

These are the ones that determine that something is not useful? Or outdated?
I see? I wonder why the Captive Stylus is one of the top accessory for tablets? There must be 10 people hoarding them all. And I imagine an active stylus that is pressure sensitive and 100x more accurate will make it less desirable. I see...
wellsy
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wellsy,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/28/2012 | 6:51:03 AM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
how can u think its outdated?? that doesnt even make sense. your just a complete idiot on every level. i the new glaxy tab works exactly the same as any other pad but the pen is a added extra! do u understand that? if you want to draw do you want to be using your finger on the tab?? no u retard you want a pen. seriously get steve jobs dead cock outa your mouth and use your pea brain
crmcwi
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crmcwi,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/27/2012 | 12:39:53 AM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
I've been using tablet PC's since 2005. Before the "tablets" came out, the Fujitsu line of slates was king. I could take one into a meeting and aside from the "wow" factor, it was completely unobtrusive in any level meeting. The Wacom tech that enables pinpoint handwriting recognition and transcription is amazing. I am able to take notes without training the XP Tablet and love it. Also, my handwriting, though barely legible to even myself, is captured accurately when I choose not to transcribe it.

My experience with iPads and Droid tablets has been very poor in these regards even though they obviously exceed the XP technology.

I've been looking forward to purchasing a Note 10.1 for months and am happy it arrived.
Samir Shah
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Samir Shah,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/23/2012 | 1:58:43 PM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
Two Tablets are needed from Samsung. Galaxy Note 10.1 and Galaxy HR (High Resolution) 10.1.
Aden11
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Aden11,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/22/2012 | 6:45:03 PM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
I strongly believe working with stylus is very 90s. Currently people in their teens are extremely proficient in using virtual keyboards and apps without styles. For them it's like a second nature. Same is the case with older people, specially people who are 60 or above. This is one of the main reason iPad is so popular in these 2 groups.

Let's see world's population is over 6.0 billion. Out of 6.0 billion, 2.405 billion population belongs to people less than 20 years old. Then another 780million people are 60 or above. This is more than a half.

I think the way things are progressing specially in voice recognition software (google talk, siri etc.), the use of styles will be very limited.
ANON1237925156805
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ANON1237925156805,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/22/2012 | 6:09:50 PM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
I loved the stylus on my Palm PDA. It gave me the option to write or type. I love the stylus for my iPad. The ability to write, type, or use my finger depending upon situation and preference is a fabulous. I can write notes in HD Note Taker and store them, email them, whatever. I can even use evernote to conver them to text if I like and store a Word document. What's not to like?

It sounds as though the Samsung tablet gives the stylus even more uses. I can't imagine why a stylus would be a negative unless it were to become the required or preferred mode of data entry or to inflate the price of a device.

I agree that younger people don't write. They probably don't doodle. These are known to be very good integrative whole brain activities. So let's hope that they give the stylus a try. You don't like it, don't use it. . .
caston
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caston,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/22/2012 | 4:53:46 PM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
Ok, doing some basic math: 2000 in the survey.
61% Apple = 1220
33% Android = 660
6% other = 120

41% would buy a tablet w/stylus = 820
31% of Android would buy w/stylus = 205

Leaving 615 non Android purchasers. Assuming for sake of argument that none of the other category would purchase Android that leave 495 Apple owners that would - 40%.

Maybe your headline should actually read: 40% of iPad users prefer Galaxy Note 10.1.

Same "facts" different interpretation. It's wonderful what you can do with numbers.

I should add that if we assume none of the others category would consider a tablet with a stylus that leaves 615 Apple users that would - over 50% of those surveyed.

How about this headline: Over half of iPad owners would purchase Galaxy Note 10.1.
Chesters Friend
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Chesters Friend,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/22/2012 | 4:43:58 PM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
So somebody who has never used a stylus is saying they would not use it because it's "dated" .. thats nice .. but I understand that the SPEN on the Samsung devices is not the old dumb plastic stick some are thinking about .. it's "smart" right? Apps will figure out what to do with it that will make it the thing to have. .. and only 31% said they'd buy .. really .. OK .. that sounds pretty good to me ... or is the spin on the numbers just because some media hate it when another product starts to shine in a field that their beloved Apple is suppose the own uncontested?
Tony Lawson
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Tony Lawson,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/22/2012 | 4:43:13 PM
re: Sorry, Galaxy Note 10.1: Tablet Owners Slam Stylus
I've been WAITING for a tablet like this with a stylus. I like written notes, just because it feels I donno more like my own. It's snappy and works pretty damn well.
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