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8/22/2012
01:37 PM
Eric Zeman
Eric Zeman
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Verizon To Back Windows Phone 8, Sprint Undecided

Verizon Wireless will be one of several U.S. carriers offering a Nokia-made Windows Phone 8 device later this year.

Windows Phone 8 Preview: A Visual Tour
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)
Windows Phone 8 Preview: A Visual Tour
Verizon Wireless will offer a Windows Phone 8 smartphone made by Nokia, according to sources cited by Bloomberg. It will sell the device by the end of the year. Scoring a distribution deal with Verizon Wireless, the nation's largest mobile network operator, is important for Nokia and Microsoft in their quest to gain a stronger foothold in the lucrative U.S. market.

Nokia and Microsoft have announced a joint press conference, to be held Sept. 5. They are expected to debut Windows Phone 8 and new Lumia hardware. Bloomberg's sources said the Verizon Lumia device likely will not be revealed at the Sept. 5 event.

Verizon Wireless currently offers just one Windows Phone device, the HTC Trophy. The Trophy was first released in May 2011, more than a year ago. Verizon has been waiting for Windows Phone to support LTE 4G, a feature that Verizon has mandated for all smartphones moving forward, before restocking its supply of Windows-based devices.

It's been much longer since Verizon Wireless offered a new device from Nokia.

The bulk of Nokia's devices use the international GSM standard. GSM is used by AT&T and T-Mobile USA in the U.S., while Sprint and Verizon use Qualcomm's CDMA standard for their 3G networks. Nokia has offered CDMA devices in the past, but never a CDMA flagship smartphone.

[ Read Nokia Taunts Samsung Ahead Of Windows Phone Launch. ]

Verizon hasn't confirmed Bloomberg's report, but the carrier has said in the past that it will support Microsoft's platform moving forward.

Meanwhile, Sprint is still on the fence about Windows Phone. When asked if Sprint will support Windows Phone 8, CEO Dan Hesse said it was too early to tell. Microsoft has shared only some details of the platform, and it would appear that Sprint isn't going to take another chance on Windows Phone until it sees device sales taking off.

Windows Phone 8 is based on the same source-code kernel that Microsoft's new desktop software, Windows 8, uses. It is a break with Windows Phone 7 a bit, but unifies Microsoft's mobile and desktop platforms.

Microsoft greatly expanded the types of hardware that can run its smartphone platform. Windows Phone will support multicore processors and removable/expandable storage. It also adds support for more screen resolutions, including 480 x 800, 768 x 1280, and 720 x 1280.

Nokia and other manufacturers are expected to take advantage of these and other changes to Windows Phone 8 to make more compelling hardware. For Nokia's and Microsoft's sakes, let's hope they take the ball and run with it.

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wht
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wht,
User Rank: Strategist
8/23/2012 | 7:44:51 PM
re: Verizon To Back Windows Phone 8, Sprint Undecided
Verizon made a big mistake in waiting about 18 months to add newer phones to their Windows 7 or 7.5 lineup. The Trophy was a good phone to start with, but was limited by its screen size. Our business of about 40 users left Verizon because Verizon had no plans going forward for Windows phones that they would discuss with us, and began pushing iPhone4, which was not acceptable for our needs; costs, security, applications, and otherwise. Not wanting to wait and needing to leave the Blackberry platform, we switched to AT&T and upgraded to Samsung Focus S and now Lumia 900. When Verizon finally joins the rest of the Windows world we might consider using both VZ and AT&T depending upon coverage areas that are more favorable for only 1 carrier. The Windows phone has been excellent for us, and Windows 8 phones and tablets will be even better. Great integration between devices, services, and Office Applications. Too bad VZ stuck it to the consumer and Microsoft for so long.
DRegalia
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DRegalia,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/23/2012 | 5:20:04 AM
re: Verizon To Back Windows Phone 8, Sprint Undecided
Just a quick comment here: Windows 7.5 has a phone that already supports LTE4, it's the HTC Titan, which was released in November of 2011 at ATT. They could have easily rebranded any of those from HTC as a Verizon Phone. Good job to Verizon tho for going for the windows phone. It truely is an amazing platform to develop for, and to use for business and personal day to day. The feature integration is amazing. I hope sprint and TMobile get on board. Also, Microsoft needs to support the HTC platforms much more, their designs runs circles around Nokia. I'm really don't like the shape of it.
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