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1/5/2010
10:41 PM
Fredric Paul
Fredric Paul
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What Does The Nexus One Google SuperPhone Mean For SMBs?

Today's big news was the introduction of Google's Nexus One smartphone. Initial reactions were largely positive, but didn't center on its possible application in small and midsize companies. InformationWeek SMB contributor Steve Hilton fills the gap.

Today's big news was the introduction of Google's Nexus One smartphone. Initial reactions were largely positive, but didn't center on its possible application in small and midsize companies. InformationWeek SMB contributor Steve Hilton fills the gap.Don't Miss: Google Reveals Nexus One 'Super Phone'

To Hilton, head of enterprise and SMB research at Analysys Mason, the Nexus One is a Ferrari. A business Ferrari. In fact, he sees Google's decision to offer both CDMA and GSM models as the equivalent of two business Ferraris in one:

"That's like Google offering two Ferraris -- one in black for date night and one in red in case date night doesn't work out. RF-technology agnosticism is the way to go... From [a business perspective, [combining] CDMA and GSM models allows a business to choose which carriers they prefer based on network coverage, personal preferences, rate plans, other (network-based) applications offered, etc.

And like a Ferrari, the Nexus One is fast with a 1GHz processor. So if the [company] wants to run specialized business applications -- whether front or back-end -- that require processing horsepower, it's certainly there."

Hilton is also impressed by the Nexus One's features, especially "Speech recognition software for writing emails [and] turn-by-turn GPS direction. If you're business buyer who wants some all-in-one devices with an open OS, large developer community, and a big touchscreen, the Nexus One is a good choice."

I guess that answers the question of the new device's appeal to SMBs. But is it good enough to knock the iPhone off its perch? We'll have to wait and see on that, but if you want to compare the features and (total) costs of the leading high-tech smartphones (except for the business-standard BlackBerry, unfortunately) BillShrink.com has a handy chart.


Read Steve Hilton's Ask Steve columns

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