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MySpace Releases Sex Offender Data To Attorneys General

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Apple And Cingular Can Keep Their iPhone, 'Cause I'm Sticking With My BlackBerry
2. Today's Top Story
    - MySpace Releases Sex Offender Data To Attorneys General
3. Breaking News
    - Do Indian Outsourcers Misuse The H-1B Visa Programs?
    - Three Scenarios For How Microsoft's Open Source Threat Could End
    - CEO Schmidt Ponders Google's More 'Personal Future'
    - Google, Salesforce In Talks To Form Alliance, Says WSJ
    - Microsoft Says 'EU Version' Of Windows Vista A Dud
    - Who Owns Linux? Linus ... And A Detergent Company In Switzerland
    - Muni Wi-Fi: Next Big Thing -- Or Next Tech Boondoggle?
    - AMD Aims To One-Up Intel With New Quad-Core Architecture
    - Down To Business: Offshoring Mania Goes To Ludicrous Extremes
    - Pick Your Presence Tool
    - IT Confidential: What If Microsoft Went Door To Door To Enforce Its Patents?
    - Facebook Opens Its Platform
    - AT&T Makeover Sunsets Cingular As iPhone Approaches
    - Alltel, The 'Little' Cell Phone Company, Is Bought For $27.5 Billion
    - Security Companies Unveil Products, Updates At Interop
    - Telecom Antitrust Suit Can't Proceed, Says Top U.S. Court
    - 2006 Shutdown Spurs Call For Investigation Of Nuclear Cybersecurity
    - Microsoft Would Have To Pay $500 Million To Escape aQuantive Deal
4. The Latest Google Blog Posts
    - Microsoft Awarded For Hurricane Katrina Efforts
    - Microsoft Shifts Server And Developer Tools Business
    - What's Hot From WinHEC? Windows Home Server
    - Microsoft's Windows Home Server Takes Interesting Storage Twist
5. Job Listings From TechCareers
6. White Papers
    - Protect Your Business With A Business-Continuity Plan
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind." -- Aristotle


1. Editor's Note: Apple And Cingular Can Keep Their iPhone, 'Cause I'm Sticking With My BlackBerry

Google is abuzz today with last Thursday's news that the FCC has granted regulatory approval to the iPhone. This means Apple's new gadget could hit the market next month -- I'm betting Steve Jobs will announce it's shipping during his keynote speech at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC 2007) in San Francisco on June 11. Me, I don't care. I'm sticking with my BlackBerry. It's rock solid, the phone sounds not half bad if you use it with a Bluetooth headset, and, most important, it's got a hard keypad.

That's my biggest complaint about the iPhone. How can it be a smartphone if it doesn't have real keys? I'd venture a guess that most smartphones are used to place calls less than 50% of the time. E-mail and SMS (a.k.a. text messages) are the raison d'etre for these things. (Which is why the real deficiency of the BlackBerry is its inability to do AIM.)

OK, I admit I've never been a big iPhone fan. Back in January, I posted what I supposed were the "Top 7 iPhone Questions Steve Jobs Doesn't Want You To Ask."

The snippier ones still ring true: Do we really need another "cool" gadget? Will the battery crap out after 18 months? And does it come with backdated stock options?

Of course, in the tech business we always do need another cool gadget, so in that regard I'm whistling into the wind. However, I think one question which is fair to ask is, at what price?

According to Cingular's Web page, where you can submit your e-mail address so you'll "be among the first to know when the iPhone is available," that price is $499 for the 4-Gbyte iPhone, or $599 for the 8-Gbyte model.

For that kind of dough, I can get a bunch of BlackBerrys (Chocolates, too!).

Quite frankly, having a nice-looking smartphone -- and I admit that the iPhone looks nicer than most corporate BlackBerrys, though the BlackBerry Pearl isn't bad -- isn't a valid reason to pay through the nose, if all the functionality isn't there (did I mention that point about the hard keyboard?).

If music players are your thing, you can get one in the BlackBerry Pearl, along with hard keys and all the other smartphone bells and whistles. Price-wise, it will cost you a lot less than an iPhone, because many carriers are offering hefty rebates.

I guarantee you that if Intel had been the company pushing an iPhone-like platform, it would have landed with one big thud. So why all the fuss about Steve Jobs' latest toy? What do you think? Leave a message on the InformationWeek Blog and let us know.

Alexander Wolfe
awolfe@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

MySpace Releases Sex Offender Data To Attorneys General
MySpace has been matching its users to information in its Sentinel Safe database and deleting registered sex offenders' profiles since May 2.


3. Breaking News

Do Indian Outsourcers Misuse The H-1B Visa Programs?
Does it help international trade -- or hurt American workers?

Three Scenarios For How Microsoft's Open Source Threat Could End
From peace in software to blowing up in Microsoft's face, here's where this brinkmanship could lead.

CEO Schmidt Ponders Google's More 'Personal Future'
The search engine's chief executive highlights how his company is creating a culture that is living with a historical record.

Google, Salesforce In Talks To Form Alliance, Says WSJ
The paper said one outcome could be a Web-based offering that integrates some of Google's online services with those of Salesforce.com.

Microsoft Says 'EU Version' Of Windows Vista A Dud
Company officials say no PC manufacturers have chosen to license the special editions of its operating systems, available only in Europe, that lack the Windows Media Player media playback software.

Who Owns Linux? Linus ... And A Detergent Company In Switzerland
In case you were wondering -- and I was, given the noises Microsoft has been making lately about the open source operating system -- Linus Torvalds does indeed own the trademark on Linux. Interestingly, so does Rosch, a detergent company based in Switzerland.

Muni Wi-Fi: Next Big Thing -- Or Next Tech Boondoggle?
Three California cities serve as case studies in what works, what doesn't, and what's still unknown.

AMD Aims To One-Up Intel With New Quad-Core Architecture
AMD reveals workings of its upcoming chips, hoping to shift the discussion to who builds the better processor.

Down To Business: Offshoring Mania Goes To Ludicrous Extremes
Whether it's tech or journalism jobs we're trying to protect, the public discourse has gone over the top.

Pick Your Presence Tool
Twitter's the current favorite, but here are eight alternatives, including Swarm-it and Jaiku, that could be a better fit for you.

IT Confidential: What If Microsoft Went Door To Door To Enforce Its Patents?
How would you feel if Steve Ballmer rang your doorbell and starting asking about the software that you used? It's not so far away from what Microsoft is trying to do with its latest patent claims.

Facebook Opens Its Platform
The company is giving developers greater access to Facebook's user networks and better tools to monetize the Facebook audience.

AT&T Makeover Sunsets Cingular As iPhone Approaches
The Cingular brand is being replaced overnight with AT&T branding in stores and kiosks and in point-of-sale materials in 1,800 company-owned outlets.

Alltel, The 'Little' Cell Phone Company, Is Bought For $27.5 Billion
The new owners have made it clear that they intend to invest in the wireless industry in a big way.

Security Companies Unveil Products, Updates At Interop
Websense, Citrix Systems, and others kick off the Interop conference with product announcements.

Telecom Antitrust Suit Can't Proceed, Says Top U.S. Court
The Supreme Court ruled Monday that an antitrust lawsuit against Verizon and other regional Bell companies cannot proceed without specific allegations to back it up.

2006 Shutdown Spurs Call For Investigation Of Nuclear Cybersecurity
Two leading Democrats say the August shutdown of a nuclear facility in Alabama could have been caused by a denial-of-service attack and needs to be investigated.

Microsoft Would Have To Pay $500 Million To Escape aQuantive Deal
If aQuantive exits the deal early, it will have to pay Microsoft $175 million.

All Our Latest News

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----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Web 2.0 Applications
As you watch Web 2.0 technologies take hold in the consumer market, start thinking now about the impact they can have in your enterprise. This InformationWeek Research report, Enterprise 2.0, will provide a glimpse into the adoption of Web 2.0 applications in the enterprise environment. Use this report to evaluate adoption plans, and understand the challenges and impact these technologies will have on users.

Server Virtualization
Many companies are virtualizing servers in their data centers, but will virtualization expand out to the desktop? Examine how more than 250 companies plan to adopt server virtualization technology in this recent InformationWeek Research report, Server Virtualization. Use this report to evaluate the benefits and management implications of moving to a virtual server structure.

-----------------------------------------


4. The Latest Microsoft Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/main/archives/microsoft/index.html

Microsoft Awarded For Hurricane Katrina Efforts
Before Hurricane Katrina even hit land, a small group of Microsoft Consulting Services employees began building, on their own and without prompting from some marketing group, a Web application to help those affected tell loved ones they were still alive after the storm. This week, the American Red Cross honored the company for its brief departure from the competitive hustle and bustle.

Microsoft Shifts Server And Developer Tools Business
Microsoft announced that it is moving senior VP Bob Muglia and his server and tools group from Microsoft's platform products and services division to the business division. The move makes some sense, but it's partially a head scratcher.

What's Hot From WinHEC? Windows Home Server
LOS ANGELES -- Microsoft's Windows Hardware Engineering Conference is winding down, and I'm trying to figure out what I've seen that's important. I mean really important. Not data, but real information. I'd say three things. One is the Rally technology I wrote about. Another is the speed that solid-state memory (like flash RAM) is showing in overtaking hard drives as primary storage for PCs. And the third is how really just plain neat the Windows Home Server product looks. You may not have heard much about it yet, but trust me, by the time it ships late this year, you're going to want it.

Microsoft's Windows Home Server Takes Interesting Storage Twist
Longhorn, Centro, Cougar, and the ever-humble "Home." What's with all the names? Well, now that Vista is well on its way -- sales reputed to be 40 million and climbing -- Microsoft appears to be shifting its attention to a dizzying array of variations on its Windows Server operating system.


5. Job Listings From TechCareers

American Home Mortgage seeking Build Manager in Melville, NY

Openlink Financial, Inc. seeking Senior Technical Consultant in Uniondale, NY

Agilent seeking IT Associate in Santa Clara, CA

Agilent seeking IT Consultant in Roseville, CA

American Home Mortgage seeking Systems Developer Associate in Melville, NY

For more great jobs, career-related news, features and services, please visit CMP Media's TechCareers.


6. White Papers

Protect Your Business With A Business-Continuity Plan
If you don't think your business will be affected by some kind of disaster, think again. The American Red Cross has estimated that as many as 40% of small businesses that experience a disaster never reopen. But you can protect yourself with a business-continuity plan. This paper tells how your organization can prepare for disaster recovery.


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