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Net Neutrality Hyperbole Stumbles On

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Net Neutrality Hyperbole Stumbles On
2. Today's Top Story
    - Black Hat: Vista Vulnerable To Stealthy Malware Despite Body Cavity Search
    Related Story:
    - Cisco Firewall Vulnerability Demonstrated At Black Hat
3. Breaking News
    - IBM Tries To Boost Pool Of RFID-Savvy IT Pros
    - Apple To Delay Quarterly Report, May Have To Restate Results Back To 2002
    - Microsoft Gears Up For Patch Tuesday
    - Hacks Decline, Worries Don't
    - Investors Hit U.S. Companies For Missing Profit Goals
    - Motorola Cites Middle East Hostilities As Business Risk
    - Microsoft Brings Storage Server OS To Custom System Builders
    - eBay Looks To Partners, ISVs To Drive Sales
4. Grab Bag: Windows Games On Intel Macs
    - Microsoft Invites Hackers To Test Vista (Washington Post)
    - 'Cider' Makes Windows Games Run On Intel Macs (Macworld)
5. In Depth: Data Recovery And Management
    - For System Recovery, DOS Is Still Boss
    - Vendors Roll Out New Removable Hard Drives
    - Teradata Adds Master Data Management Capabilities To Its Lineup
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Security As A Service Is Old Fish Wrapped In New Paper
7. White Papers
    - The Remote Access Imperative In Disaster Recovery
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Democracy is a process by which the people are free to choose the man who will get the blame." -- Laurence J. Peter (1919 - 1988)


1. Editor's Note: Net Neutrality Hyperbole Stumbles On

The other day I was listening to the steady drone of machines digging holes while Verizon installed fiber optic cables in my neighborhood. It reminded me of another cacophony that's got me ruffled.

Yes, net neutrality. Who would have thought telecommunications could create such exaggerated name calling? After hearing only the opposing arguments, one would conclude robber barons on one side of the table are arm-wrestling robber barons on the other side of the table to see who can be the first to destroy the Internet.

Net neutrality advocates, I get it already. Oligopolistic AT&T and Verizon want to extract more money than they already do from the pockets of poor consumers, precisely so that they don't have to innovate. They want to create a two-tiered system where their services are Internet Plus and everyone else's--including competing VoIP and video providers--are relegated to something akin to a 2,400 baud connection. And they'll use the vise grips they have on Congress to make sure that happens. It's all preposterous, as if someone wanted to tell me where and how I could and couldn't walk on the sidewalk.

Telecommunications companies, I get you, too. The net neutrality crowd is nothing more than the minions of the big technology companies that want an unfair competitive advantage. Google is evil. It wants to clog up the Internet with high-bandwidth applications, but it doesn't want to pay for it. Same with all the other companies...they want a free ride. Consumers and companies should be given the choice to buy more, better, faster, and the Internet won't suffer. Besides, all the fuss is about hypotheticals, anyway.

I'm not here to argue what should or shouldn't be done. Some smart people have already done so, and others can help educate you on the issues. I'm just suggesting that while the telecom bill sits in election-year limbo, both parties need to calm it a bit and explain things in simple, real terms. Otherwise, a poorly written law or lack of any laws could have negative consequences for both sides. Then again, Washington has always been about hyperbole, a place where truth is often stranger than fiction anyway, and I'm just a lowly journalist. My idea could be just a pipe dream. Or a series-of-tubes dream.

You can read more of my opinion, or better yet, weigh in on this topic, at my blog entry.

J. Nicholas Hoover
J. Nicholas Hoover
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Black Hat: Vista Vulnerable To Stealthy Malware Despite Body Cavity Search
A security researcher demonstrated how to trick the Windows Vista Beta 2 kernel, x64 edition, into allowing any unsigned device driver to be loaded onto a user's system. This opens the door to malicious code injection. Defenses to such an attack were also presented.

Related Stories:

Cisco Firewall Vulnerability Demonstrated At Black Hat
A Cisco spokesman says the company is aware of the information, but "can not confirm the validity of the claims."


3. Breaking News

IBM Tries To Boost Pool Of RFID-Savvy IT Pros
IBM is offering free online resources, including best practices for implementing RFID, to help developers get up to speed.

Apple To Delay Quarterly Report, May Have To Restate Results Back To 2002
The company has been conducting an internal probe into stock option irregularities, focusing on a period between 1997 and 2001. In a SEC filing Thursday, Apple warned that all financial communications issued since Sept. 29, 2002, shouldn't be relied on.

Microsoft Gears Up For Patch Tuesday
Next week, Microsoft is planning to release 10 security patches for Windows, and two for Office.

Hacks Decline, Worries Don't
The annual CSI/FBI Computer Crime and Security Survey found a continuing decline in cyberattacks, but says one cause could be the fact that businesses are increasingly unwilling to report security incidents.

Investors Hit U.S. Companies For Missing Profit Goals
Two years of rising interest rates and unrest in the Middle East are putting investors on edge. And it's all at a time when tech stocks are taking a beating.

Motorola Cites Middle East Hostilities As Business Risk
The world's second-largest cell phone maker has manufacturing and engineering operations in Israel and employs 3,500 workers there.

Microsoft Brings Storage Server OS To Custom System Builders
A Microsoft spokesman says it's easier to make it more broadly available with the release of Longhorn.

eBay Looks To Partners, ISVs To Drive Sales
The online auction giant wasn't always so eager to create a channel, but today one-quarter of its listings come through third-party tools.

All Our Latest News

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4. Grab Bag: Windows Games On Intel Macs

Microsoft Invites Hackers To Test Vista (Washington Post)
After suffering embarrassing security exploits over the past several years, Microsoft is trying a new tactic: inviting some of the world's best-known computer experts to try to poke holes in Vista, the next generation of its Windows operating system.

'Cider' Makes Windows Games Run On Intel Macs (Macworld)
Coming soon: Windows games that will run on Intel Macs thanks to TransGaming's new Cider software. There's no rebooting involved and no separate Windows partition to be installed.


5. In Depth: Data Recovery And Management

For System Recovery, DOS Is Still Boss
Even with all its faults—and there are many, starting with a general industry lack of support—DOS is still the preferred operating environment for building a rescue CD to help bring up a crippled system.

Vendors Roll Out New Removable Hard Drives
Some customers use the new drives to rotate disks off-site for disaster recovery.

Teradata Adds Master Data Management Capabilities To Its Lineup
Master data management is becoming increasingly important as businesses try to integrate disparate data sources scattered throughout their organizations.


6. Voice Of Authority: Security As A Service

Security As A Service Is Old Fish Wrapped In New Paper
McAfee beat rival Symantec to the finish line yesterday when it rolled out four different suites based on its Falcon technology, which the company has been billing as its answer to Microsoft's OneCare. But rather than say OneCare, I say, "Who cares?"


7. White Papers

The Remote Access Imperative In Disaster Recovery
As organizations prepare a disaster recovery plan, it's important to include remote access as a fundamental part of the disaster recovery infrastructure. This document explores best practices for disaster recovery and the role of SSL VPNs in that process.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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