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12/26/2007
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Netgear Expands ReadyNAS Line Of Storage Products

The new products stem from Netgear's $60 million acquisition of Infrant, which was announced in early May.

Netgear has expanded its line of ReadyNAS storage products with five Linux-based models that target prosumers and small and medium-sized businesses.

The latest network-attached storage products, called ReadyNAS NV+, are based on technology from Infrant, which Netgear bought this year. The systems come in 1.5-, 2-, 3-, and 4-Tbyte models. Topping the product line, which comes with a five-year hardware warranty, is a 4-Tbyte rack-mount version.

ReadyNAS products support RAID 0, 1, and 5 and use Netgear's proprietary X-RAID technology. RAID, or redundant arrays of independent disks, is a computer data storage scheme that divides and replicates data across multiple hard disk drives. X-RAID technology makes it possible to hot swap disk drives without taking down the system.

The new products stem from Netgear's $60 million acquisition of Infrant, which was announced in early May. The ReadyNAS NV+ line uses Infrant's network storage processor and its Linux-based RAIDiator operating system. Infrant also developed X-RAID.

Other features of the new products include Gigabit Ethernet and a graphical user interface that launches in a Web browser. The storage devices also ship with EMC's Retrospect backup and recovery software, which supports Linux, Macintosh, and Windows-based computers.

The appliances also have an integrated backup manager for moving data to an external hard drive via a USB port or to a remote server. The systems also provide a centralized file system for networked devices and support video streaming to multiple devices simultaneously.

Pricing for the new products, unveiled late last week, starts at $1,099.

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