News
News
11/10/2006
06:52 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

New Site Pays Bloggers For Reviews Of Advertisers' Products

And as part of a limited-time promotional offer, Reviewme.com will pay bloggers to review Reviewme.com itself.

Reviewme.com is offering bloggers up to $250 for reviews of advertisers products or Web sites. And, as part of a promotional offer, the company set aside $25,000 to pay bloggers to review Reviewme.com itself.

"The $25,000 is almost used up, and we want to keep the promotion alive, so we're probably going to extend it," said Andy Hagans, president of ReviewMe,, on Friday.

The Web site launched on Thursday, and within 24 hours had lined up more than a thousand bloggers to review products in categories ranging from autos and books to real estate and sports, Hagans said.

ReviewMe joins privately held PayPerPost, which launched in July, in playing broker between advertiser and blogger. Among the differences in the two sites is that advertisers with PayPerPost dictate the kind of review or write-up they want. ReviewMe, on the other hand, requires that bloggers be allowed to write responsible reviews based on their honest opinion.

ReviewMe also requires bloggers to disclose that their reviews are paid for, while PayPerPost encourages the practice. PayPerPost, based in Orlando, Fla., has been criticized for not requiring disclosure.

ReviewMe pays bloggers from $20 to $250 per review, based on the reach of their blogs. To determine that, ReviewMe uses metrics gathered from online news aggregator Bloglines, blog search engine Technorati, and Web traffic tracking service Alexa. Bloggers are rejected if they don't meet a minimum requirement that ReviewMe doesn't disclose.

"If the blog doesn't meet a general threshold of at least having a significant amount of readers, than it doesn't have much value for the advertiser," Hagans said. "And even though the three measurements are inexact, it's better to get the numbers from third parties, rather than from bloggers, since they're prone to exaggerate."

Bloggers who cross the bar are placed on a list that advertisers browse in looking for a reviewer, who must agree to write a minimum of 200 words. Hagans believes advertisers will be served just as well by positive and negative reviews, because the latter will provide constructive criticism.

"No one is trashing advertisers, and they're still getting buzz in the blogosphere," Hagans said. "It's a low cost way to get feedback from people in your industry."

All reviews are checked to make sure they discuss the right product and meet the word requirement before they are posted. Advertisers are billed after the review is on the blog.

ReviewMe was in development for six months before the launch. The site was owned by Text Link Ads, which was recently bought by MediaWhiz Holdings.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
IT's Reputation: What the Data Says
InformationWeek's IT Perception Survey seeks to quantify how IT thinks it's doing versus how the business really views IT's performance in delivering services - and, more important, powering innovation. Our results suggest IT leaders should worry less about whether they're getting enough resources and more about the relationships they have with business unit peers.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Must Reads Oct. 21, 2014
InformationWeek's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of digital strategy. Learn why you should learn to embrace DevOps, how to avoid roadblocks for digital projects, what the five steps to API management are, and more.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Archived InformationWeek Radio
A roundup of the top stories and trends on InformationWeek.com
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.