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Novell Says Open Source License Changes Could Kill Microsoft

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Can History Survive The Internet?
2. Today's Top Story
    - Novell Says Open Source License Changes Could Kill Microsoft
    Related Story
    - Linux Foundation To Microsoft: Touch One Of Us, Fight Us All
3. Breaking News
    - FTC Reviews Google's Plans For DoubleClick
    - Microsoft's SharePoint Server Gets DOD Certification
    - Mac OS X Exploit Hits Soon After Apple Releases Patch
    - China To Use Computer Viruses As Cyberwarfare First Strike
    - BEA Systems To Launch Software For Complex Event Processing
    - Author's Libel Suit Characterizes Online Smears As Cyberstalking
    - Toshiba To Use AMD Chip In Laptop PCs
    - NEC Staff Caught Faking Orders, Taking Kickbacks
    - Beatnik Offers Music Format For Low-Cost Phones
    - Shiver Me Timbers! Scam Unleashes Trojan With Movie Ticket Lure
    - Avaya-Nortel Deal Could Create IP Phone Leader, Analysts Say
    - T-Mobile's Parent, Deutsche Telekom, Invests In VoIP Startup Jajah
4. The Latest Mobile Blog Posts
    - Will The iPhone, Wing, And Other Wi-Fi-Enabled Smartphones Usher In FMC?
    - FeedBurner Deal Puts Google Closer To Controlling Online Publishers
    - 90% Of Cell Phone Owners Rate iPhone Over Theirs
    - Wireless Wrap From This Year's Interop
5. Job Listings From TechCareers
6. White Papers
    - Breakthrough Data Recovery For AIX And Unix
7. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
8. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quotes Of The Day: History
"History will be kind to me for I intend to write it." -- Sir Winston Churchill

"If you write a post and put it on a blog, that's a historical document. If you change your template, then that entry looks completely different. It's the same words, but not the same meaning. This all depends on what historical questions that people will be asking, and we can't know what they will want." -- Josh Greenberg, Digital Preservation and Blogs, SXSW 2006

"I always wrote with the idea that what I put out there is going to stay there. Once I publish something, it has been published. I've never deleted more than one or two posts from my site. I don't think that there are take-backs. I don't feel right about it." -- Alison Headley, Digital Preservation and Blogs, SXSW 2006


1. Editor's Note: Can History Survive The Internet?

The Internet is a wondrous place indeed. Besides all the practical benefits that are too numerous (and obvious) to mention here, there are few limits to where your imagination combined with Web technology can take you.

For example, don't like your current life? Didn't turn out to be the person you thought you would? Or perhaps, who you'd rather be? No problem, the holodeck is open for business. In case you've missed our extensive coverage of Second Life and its competitors, a wide range of fantasy worlds awaits you online. There's the preprogrammed option, where incredibly realistic games of all genres either require participants to take on predetermined roles or enable them to direct the "action." On the other end of the spectrum are the virtual worlds where you can re-create yourself from the ground up -- completely unencumbered by any tethers to reality. You might say it's your passport to a second chance at getting it right, even if it's not real.

But why limit your fantasies to the virtual world? Why not change the past to reflect the present or simply to hide the facts? The real world is decidedly very uncooperative on this issue (unless we're talking about the Congressional Record). You cannot go back and change what has been published in hard copy. The best you can hope for is some combination of the following: an agreement or a court order to run a correction, a halt to further publication of the content at issue, and that contradictory or updated content gets published.

But then there's the Internet. Oh the possibilities online. You can not only look up more information at one time from one place, but you also stand a much greater chance of both retaining and rewriting history. Never mind that old saw about how those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it (George Santayana). Going forward, that truism could easily evolve into this: Those who rewrite the past control history. Or, if you like, those who rewrite history are guaranteed a brighter future.

Certainly, we've seen examples where people with ulterior motives have sought to change content posted on the Internet. One example is the effort by political staffers to alter politicians' profiles on Wikipedia. Then there are the seemingly benign requests to alter previously published material online by swapping in a more flattering photo, adding more relevant information, or making a minor tweak. I recently received a request to make a minor change to a 3-year-old story to reflect current realities (the author no longer worked at the company).

We decided not to accommodate that request. You can find out why I think such requests are a really bad idea that could open a Pandora's box if publishers aren't careful by reading the rest of this note here. Then tell us what you think. Where should content providers and news organizations draw the line on making changes or additions to already published material? How far back should we be willing to go? What about the slippery slope, where we may start with inconsequential changes but open the door to more nefarious efforts to rewrite history? I think the answers to these questions -- and some standard guidelines for dealing with the issue -- are important in a digital society. I say the old saw still holds true, though with a slight tweak for the modern age: Those who are not exposed to history are doomed to repeat it.

Patricia Keefe
pkeefe@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Novell Says Open Source License Changes Could Kill Microsoft Deal
Novell said that proposed revisions to the General Public License could force the company to modify its relationship with Microsoft or find alternatives to the deal.

Related Story:

Linux Foundation To Microsoft: Touch One Of Us, Fight Us All
Microsoft's Windows operating system and Office desktop applications are threatened by open source code, but the company will be reluctant to file a patent suit, foundation officials said.


3. Breaking News

FTC Reviews Google's Plans For DoubleClick
Analysts suggest that antitrust concerns will take precedence over privacy concerns during the evaluation.

Microsoft's SharePoint Server Gets DOD Certification
The company's Office collaboration and document management tool gains some stature with the military's 5015.2 seal of approval.

Mac OS X Exploit Hits Soon After Apple Releases Patch
Exploit code has been released for a buffer overflow vulnerability that could enable a remote hacker to take control of a system.

China To Use Computer Viruses As Cyberwarfare First Strike
The Defense Department reports that the People's Liberation Army is moving beyond traditional battlefields and into cyberspace.

Author's Libel Suit Characterizes Online Smears As Cyberstalking
Patricia Cornwell wants to prevent Leslie R. Sachs from writing about her on the Internet.

BEA Systems To Launch Software For Complex Event Processing
Complex event processing servers are able to match detected events to rules embedded in them that either sanction or disapprove of the recognized sequence.

Toshiba To Use AMD Chip In Laptop PCs
AMD will start providing microprocessors to Toshiba, ending the Japanese electronics maker's exclusive ties with Intel.

NEC Staff Caught Faking Orders, Taking Kickbacks
Tax investigators probing NEC have found that employees placed fake orders and took kickbacks, compounding the problems at a company long dogged by accounting troubles and possibly facing a Nasdaq delisting.

Beatnik Offers Music Format For Low-Cost Phones
The file format is one-tenth the size of the typical MP3 file, making it possible to quickly download tunes on older digital mobile phone networks found in emerging markets.

Shiver Me Timbers! Scam Unleashes Trojan With Movie Ticket Lure
A new spam scam is teasing users to open a malicious attachment with promises of free tickets to see Pirates Of The Caribbean 3.

Avaya-Nortel Deal Could Create IP Phone Leader, Analysts Say
A merger between Avaya and Nortel Networks could create a leading vendor of Web-based phone systems, analysts said Tuesday, as talk swirled over a possible buyout bid for the U.S. telecommunications equipment maker.

T-Mobile's Parent, Deutsche Telekom, Invests In VoIP Startup Jajah
The investment marks the first by a cell phone service provider in VoIP and is a signal that the German company is willing to risk the cannibalization of its existing landline service.

All Our Latest News

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Anatomy Of A Breach (And How To Prevent One)
InformationWeek/Network Computing Vendor Perspectives TechWebCast

New targeted, caustic threats require new responses that strictly secure your critical information assets, while proving it with 100% surety. In this TechWebCast, we look at a real data breach, working our way back from the use of stolen confidential information to an analysis of the breakdown in internal controls. We examine the fundamental shift of IT risk to the insider threat and the inability of legacy protection mechanisms to stop it. We itemize and quantify the impact from containment to notification. Most importantly, we discuss eradication of the breach risk.
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4. The Latest Mobile Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/mobile/

Will The iPhone, Wing, And Other Wi-Fi-Enabled Smartphones Finally Usher In FMC?
We all know the iPhone has Wi-Fi. The new HTC Wing, launched by T-Mobile last week, also has it. RIM CEO Jim Balsillie said in a speech that we'll see Wi-Fi on a BlackBerry device by year's end. Will this new crop of devices convince U.S. carriers to offer fixed-mobile convergence services?

FeedBurner Deal Puts Google Closer To Controlling Online Publishers
If Google finally pulls the trigger and closes its proposed deal to buy FeedBurner, it will be one step closer to having all the tools its needs to control online publishers. Do you feel that hand near your throat?

90% Of Cell Phone Owners Rate iPhone Over Theirs
That lovely statistic comes from a recent Strategy Analytics' Wireless Device Labs study on the perceptions of technology. I have to find a small amount of fault in their methodology, though. The study participants' reactions were based on a video they watched of the iPhone, and not actually using the iPhone itself. Would the results be the same with hardware on the table?

Wireless Wrap From This Year's Interop
Wireless and mobility were big topics at this year's Interop. Let's take a look at the wireless news in review.


5. Job Listings From TechCareers

Neighborhood Health Plan of Rhode Island seeking Systems Analyst in Providence, RI

Brandes Investment Partners seeking Sr. Business Systems Analyst in San Diego, CA

American Home Mortgage seeking .NET Developer in Melville, NY

Openlink Financial, Inc. seeking Client Support Analyst in Uniondale, NY

Openlink Financial, Inc. seeking Quality Assurance Analyst in Uniondale, NY

For more great jobs, career-related news, features and services, please visit CMP Media's TechCareers.


6. White Papers

Breakthrough Data Recovery Strategies For AIX And Unix Environments
For Unix and AIX IT departments looking to take the next step in data protection and recovery strategies, CDP is an essential consideration. Learn how new software is making data protection, data recovery, and high availability easier and more affordable for small and midsize organizations.


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