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On Site In India

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: On Site In India
2. Today's Top Story
    - The Ultimate PC For 2006
    - Langa Letter: 10 Critical Factors When Buying A New PC
3. Breaking News
    - Microsoft Patent Victory Could Hurt Open Source
    - Microsoft Extends Exchange 5.0, 5.5 Support To Patch Critical Bug
    - Apple Updates Mac OS X
    - Apple Fixes Eight QuickTime Bugs
    - Wi-Fi Moves Into Grocery Stores
    - Novell Unveils Linux App Security Project
    - Pfizer Uses RFID To Stop Viagra Counterfeiters
    - AMD Intros High-End Athlon For Gamers
    - College Student Aims High With Web Wall
4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web
    - Rivals Turn Up Heat To Challenge Toyota Hybrid Push
    - New York City Starts To Monitor Diabetics
    - Question Hour With Mozilla
5. In Depth: Analysis And Reports
    - Microsoft's Newest Bug Could Be Awful, Researcher Says
    - Search Advertising Up 44% Last Year
    - Report: 2005 A Record Year For Outsourcing
    - Report Calls For New Nanotech Laws
    - Analyst Declares Blu-Ray The Winner
    - Report: Mobile-Phone Revenue To Decline
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Not Digging The Mob Mentality
7. White Papers
    - Unknown Attack: A Clear And Growing Danger
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"When you were born, you cried and the world rejoiced. Live your life so that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice." -- Old Indian saying


1. Editor's Note: On Site In India

Does my color look a little funny to you? Like, maybe, green? I'm green with envy now over the adventure my colleagues Aaron Ricadela and Ron Anderson are having, visiting the tech centers of India. Aaron, who writes for InformationWeek, and Ron, who writes for our sister publication Network Computing, are there, now and for the next couple of weeks, compiling information for a special report from India. We'll be bringing you a series of articles in coming weeks; for now, you can get a sample of what they're seeing and doing by regularly visiting the InformationWeek Weblog.

The series of blog entries kicks off with one by Ron Anderson, mostly chronicling his first impressions of the country, with photos.

Aaron describes how the campus of outsourcer Infosys is an oasis in the midst of Indian's poverty:

Slog your way down Hosur Road, the main artery into the Bangalore tech district dubbed "Electronics City," and you'll pass tin-roofed shacks, crumbling buildings, a quarter-mile-long vegetable wholesale market erected on the black dirt to the side of the road, and hundreds of Indians trying to ply a living from the makeshift or decaying businesses along it. Hosur Road is also chocked with traffic, as the buses bearing young workers down to the Electronics City companies fight for space with Bangalore's chaotic mix of cars, delivery trucks, motorized rickshaws, motor bikes, and the occasional cow. ... But inside the gates of Infosys, it's another story. It's like a fairytale trip to the first world. Armies of landscapers and maintenance workers keep the grounds' lawns, ponds, swimming pools, and golf courses immaculate. On-campus stores out of Main Street America sell the latest software, cell phones, and sundries. Employees--the average age is 26, according to my public-relations guide--are encouraged to stay after work to avail themselves of Infosys' pools, gym, game rooms, library, and paddle boats. Buildings and plazas are modeled after architectural favorites of chairman [Narayana] Murthy--there's a fake Sydney Opera House, Louvre pyramid, and St. Petersburg fountains.

Aaron also writes that Hewlett-Packard's labs in India are building computer and network technology for the vast majority of Indians, who don't currently have access to it. He describes how Indian engineers are working to overcome a key obstacle: input devices, which must work with an alphabet where the letters change shape as you add new letters ahead of the old ones.

And Ron wraps things up--for now--with his account of visits to Wipro and Microland.

Keep watching the InformationWeek Blog and this newsletter for more updates in coming weeks.

And when you're done with your virtual visit to India, check out my latest video: Researchers at the University of Amsterdam analyzed the Mona Lisa using advanced emotion-recognition software and figured out why she's smiling. Watch my video commentary (1 min., 32 sec.) WARNING: May induce laughing behavior.

Mitch Wagner
mwagner@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

The Ultimate PC For 2006
Why buy a ho-hum, off-the-rack computer when you can cherry-pick components to create a truly superior PC? Find out which products made the grade as we put together this year's screamer.

Related Story:

Langa Letter: 10 Critical Factors When Buying A New PC
Fred Langa outlines and explains his top decision points when purchasing new desktop hardware.


3. Breaking News

Microsoft Patent Victory Could Hurt Open Source
The software maker's victory in the battle over file-allocation-table patents is raising concerns in the open-source community. Some fear this means that global patents systems pose a danger to the health of Linux and the open-source community at large.

Microsoft Extends Exchange 5.0, 5.5 Support To Patch Critical Bug
Formalizing a change in its support policies Tuesday, the company broke with its past practice of not supplying patches after a product is put out to pasture.

Apple Updates Mac OS X
Enhancements to Mac OS X 10.4.4 include improvements to the Safari Web browser, and a number of new widgets--including one for Google searches--add features to iChat and resolve problems in .Mac synchronization sessions.

Apple Fixes Eight QuickTime Bugs
The problems related to how the QuickTime player parses a number of image file formats, including .gif, .tif, and .tga.

Wi-Fi Moves Into Grocery Stores
The first Stop & Shop installation, which opened last month, is in its Dorchester, Mass., store.

Novell Unveils Linux App Security Project
AppArmor is enterprise-level security software that Novell says can be deployed in hours and maintained cost-effectively without needing deep Linux or security expertise.

Pfizer Uses RFID To Stop Viagra Counterfeiters
In December, Pfizer began putting radio-frequency identification tags on all Viagra shipments in the United States; some 5 million counterfeit pills were seized last year.

AMD Intros High-End Athlon For Gamers
AMD topped off its AMD64 processor family Tuesday with its Athlon 64 FX-60 dual-core processor and aimed it at power-hungry gamers and heavy digital media users.

College Student Aims High With Web Wall
A 19-year-old is trying to raise money with the world's longest Internet page, which has postings from a broad array of people and companies.

All our latest news

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat With 'Patents/Medicine'
IBM loads up on patents, Pfizer tracks Viagra with RFID, and more.

John Soat And Tom Claburn With 'Apple Unleashed'
Apple unveils new Mac with Intel chip and more from Macworld.

Paul Kapustka With 'Sexual Identity'
It's not hard to tell the difference between the CES attendees and the Adult Video Expo goers in Vegas.


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

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4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web

Rivals Turn Up Heat To Challenge Toyota Hybrid Push (Reuters)
Toyota Motor Corp. pushed the hybrid envelope further this week by unveiling two high-profile cars equipped with the power train at the annual Detroit auto show, but competitors responded by cranking up the volume to promote rival clean-engine technologies.

New York City Starts To Monitor Diabetics (The Washington Post)
New York City is starting to monitor the blood-sugar levels of its diabetic residents, marking the first time any government in the United States has begun tracking people with a chronic disease.

Question Hour With Mozilla (The Washington Post)
The Mozilla Foundation gives it up about security, incompatible sites, sites that get around Firefox's built-in pop-up blocker, bugs, the future of Firefox, and the Thunderbird mail client.


5. In Depth: Analysis and Reports

Microsoft's Newest Bug Could Be Awful, Researcher Says
Forget the WMF problems; the really big issue could be with the flaws in Outlook and Exchange that Microsoft disclosed on Tuesday. All that's required to exploit this is an E-mail message.

Search Advertising Up 44% Last Year
Advertisers spent $5.75 billion last year, a trade group says, with revenue expected to continue climbing quickly for the next five years at least.

Report: 2005 A Record Year For Outsourcing
The number of outsourcing contracts increased 9% last year, but the majority of that work is still performed within the United States.

Report Calls For New Nanotech Laws
Old regulations that weren't designed to be applied specifically to nanotechnology could result in a public backlash, loss of markets, and potential financial liabilities, a new study says.

Analyst Declares Blu-Ray The Winner
At last week's Consumer Electronics Show, it was "obvious" that much of the "enthusiasm and momentum" are on the Blu-ray side," the Semico Research analyst says in a new report.

Report: Mobile-Phone Revenue To Decline
ISuppli projects that global revenue from mobile-phone production will shrink by almost 5% from last year's historic high.


6. Voice Of Authority

Not Digging The Mob Mentality
J. Nicholas Hoover says: A whole community gave O'Reilly Media blogger and editor Steve Mallett a rude introduction to the pitfalls of social bookmarking, blogging, and syndication. Popular technology news site and Slashdot heir-apparent Digg, where users control a story's prominence with their votes, promoted to the front page of that site a community member's accusation that Mallett purposefully stole Digg code to create a couple of his own Web pages. The story garnered tremendous attention and hundreds of comments from the popular site. There's only one problem: Mallett never deliberately stole anything.


7. White Papers

Unknown Attacks: A Clear And Growing Danger
Unknown attacks are quickly becoming the next great information security challenge for organizations. This new special report, written by well-known security expert Mark Bouchard, explores the details of this growing danger and provides an evaluation of the various technologies available to counter the risk it introduces.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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