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Prevent Daylight-Saving Time Problems On Smartphones

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Making Up For A Data Breach
2. Today's Top Story
    - Prevent Daylight-Saving Time Problems On Smartphones
3. Breaking News
    - Cisco Warns That 77 Routers Are Vulnerable To New Drive-By Pharming Attack
    - Overall, Trust In The Federal Government Is On The Decline
    - CDT Analyzes Data Retention, Other Proposals For Protecting Kids Online
    - Cisco To Acquire XML Gateway Provider Reactivity
    - $1 Billion Contract Gives AT&T Key Role In GM's Globalization Effort
    - Critical Vulnerability Caught In Google Desktop
    - 'Bandido' Software Pirate Arraigned In U.S. On 2 Charges
    - SAP Hires Software-As-A-Service Exec
    - T.J. Maxx Probe Reveals Data Breach Worse Than Originally Thought
    - Gates: Windows Vista Has Had 'Incredible Reception'
    - HP Quarterly Profit Rises, Helped By PCs
    - Dell To Pay $5 Million To Former CEO Kevin Rollins
    - How To Secure Your Home Wireless Network: Part V
4. The Latest Inside Technology Blog Posts
    - If The Stork Brings Babies, What Brings Digital Cameras? A Trade Show
    - Voice And Mobile E-Mail Are Driving Mobile Enterprise Growth In Asia-Pacific
    - Microsoft Rattles Anti-Linux Saber
    - Intel Inside ... Health Care? You Should Care.
5. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
6. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." -- Albert Einstein


1. Editor's Note: Making Up For A Data Breach

Do companies really care about the security of their customers' data? Quite frankly, not as much as they should, based on what's in the news. Lately, it seems, we've been hearing about all types of data breaches: retailer TJX, the state of Connecticut, Stop & Shop, and the Department of Veterans Affairs. It's an epidemic, but don't turn to Johns Hopkins; an outside contractor to that health facility lost nine backup tapes that held sensitive personal information on 52,000 workers and 83,000 patients. The data is "thought" to have been destroyed. That's not really very comforting if you're one of those 135,000 people. And that's a pretty big number.

One big problem is that executives give data protection a lot of lip service these days. But if you think about it, what choice do companies have? Shareholders aren't going to be really happy with, "Part of our cost-cutting measures include neglecting our customer data." In fact, these companies probably invested quite a bit in some type of business intelligence product. Data mining is all the rage, and for good reason. There are plenty of lucrative marketing opportunities out there, if you can make sense out of all that data collected. Identifying repeat customers, buying trends, and other information that can better your business justifies collecting some types of data in the first place. But some of what's collected seems odd. For example, TJX stored the license numbers of people who returned items without a receipt. Now, what's done with that information? How often does a retailer track someone down using the driver's license number? Seems to me companies could simply refuse to make a return without a receipt (like Toys "R" Us has recently done). The point is, how much information is necessary, and how much is overkill? Companies are opening themselves up to more exposure by collecting too much information. It's all the more to worry about if there's a breach.

So, here are my Common Sense Rules. First, companies ought to only hang on to information that is absolutely necessary. That way, if it's stolen (TJX), lost (Johns Hopkins), or otherwise compromised (Stop & Shop), there's less to worry about, plain and simple. Second, companies should have possession of that data for only a specified period of time -- something that's currently mandated for credit card information, but apparently was ignored by some of the parties involved. Finally, there should be a Customer Bill of Rights regarding what happens if your data goes astray. The JetBlue debacle of last week in which airline passengers were stranded on the tarmac for hours -- and the resultant Passenger Bill of Rights -- could act as a model for this. If companies must make reparations for lax data security, it's more likely that they will pay attention to keeping it locked up to begin with.

Jennifer Bosavage
Jdalessa24@yahoo.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story

Prevent Daylight-Saving Time Problems On Smartphones
Most mobile operating system and smartphone makers have either issued or are in the process of issuing updates to fix the DST problem.


3. Breaking News

Cisco Warns That 77 Routers Are Vulnerable To New Drive-By Pharming Attack
Users -- both home and commercial -- need to change the default user name and password on their routers.

Overall, Trust In The Federal Government Is On The Decline
The U.S. Postal Service inspires the highest level of trust, while the National Security Agency scored the lowest.

CDT Analyzes Data Retention, Other Proposals For Protecting Kids Online
The Center for Democracy and Technology recommends education and filtering tools to prevent what it calls an unfair burden of liability on content and communications providers.

Cisco To Acquire XML Gateway Provider Reactivity
The purchase would fill a hole in the network equipment maker's platform for managing applications within a data center.

$1 Billion Contract Gives AT&T Key Role In GM's Globalization Effort
GM is counting on AT&T's telephony expertise to ease its expansion into emerging geographies where telecom standards may differ from those used in the United States and Europe.

Critical Vulnerability Caught In Google Desktop
Google is pushing out a fix to users through its auto updating system, but security pros recommend users manually update their systems.

'Bandido' Software Pirate Arraigned In U.S. On 2 Charges
The purported leader of an organized criminal group known as DrinkOrDie faces up to 10 years in prison and a $500,000 fine related to charges of copyright infringement.

SAP Hires Software-As-A-Service Exec
The hiring of Peter Dunning, formerly with RightNow Technologies, comes as SAP prepares a new on-demand software delivery model for midsize businesses.

T.J. Maxx Probe Reveals Data Breach Worse Than Originally Thought
The retailer's parent company believes portions of the credit and debit card transactions at its U.S., Puerto Rican, and Canadian stores from January 2003 through June 2004 were compromised.

Gates: Windows Vista Has Had 'Incredible Reception'
"People who sell PCs have seen a very nice lift in their sales. People have come in and wanted to buy Vista," Bill Gates says.

HP Quarterly Profit Rises, Helped By PCs
Boosted by its booming PC business, Hewlett-Packard's quarterly profit rose 26%, topping Wall Street targets.

Dell To Pay $5 Million To Former CEO Kevin Rollins
The PC powerhouse will pay $5 million in severance to former CEO Kevin Rollins after he was replaced by founder Michael Dell in January.

How To Secure Your Home Wireless Network: Part V
More of our excerpt from the book Home Network Security Simplified, which details how to make sure that your home PC wireless network is secure.

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4. The Latest Inside Technology Blog Posts
http://www.informationweek.com/blog/

If The Stork Brings Babies, What Brings Digital Cameras? A Trade Show
Judging from the volume of press releases, more digital cameras than babies have been born in the month of February.

Voice And Mobile E-Mail Are Driving Mobile Enterprise Growth In Asia-Pacific
Just in case you had any doubts that mobile enterprise is back and bigger than ever, check out the latest findings from Frost & Sullivan.

Microsoft Rattles Anti-Linux Saber
CEO Steve Ballmer rattled Microsoft's saber against Linux among Wall Street analysts. It's clear that he means to make threatening noises, but what exactly is under threat?

Intel Inside ... Health Care? You Should Care
Intel's latest initiative aims to bring its PC expertise into the hospital, with lots of friends in tow.


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