News
News
1/27/2006
01:36 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Review: Four Low-Cost Laser Printers

Why pay for color you don't need? These four lasers compete with inkjets on initial price and save you money on per-page cost.

Color is great where it's needed. But does every page you print have (or need) color ink on it? Today's low-priced monochrome laser printers offer quick print times, and better overall text quality, than most inkjet printers.

And while lasers cost more in the beginning, they can save you money over the long run. Inkjet printer prices start below $50, but with an average cartridge price of $30 and a per-page cost of about 10 cents, it doesn't take long to spend a couple of hundred dollars on printing. Inexpensive laser printers start around $75, and supply costs can be as low a couple of pennies a page. Maybe it's time to move your inkjet to the side and use one of these laser printers as your default printer.


In This Roundup

•  Introduction

•  Brother HL-2040

•  Dell 1100

•  HP Laserjet 1020

•  Konica Minolta PagePro 1350W

•  Conclusions And Product Info

I looked at four laser printers that are available for about $100. (List prices ranged from $76 to $180, but rebates and discounts make any printer's price a function of how willing you are to hunt for a bargain.) They all have USB connectors, but no network interfaces (sharing has to be done thorough the PC that the printer is connected to). All of them were easy to set up, though the quality and helpfulness of their installation instructions varied.

All these printers produce excellent text output. Graphic output varies greatly from one printer to another as noted within each review, but as monochrome print devices, graphic output is not their primary purpose.

Previous
1 of 6
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Business of Going Digital
The Business of Going Digital
Digital business isn't about changing code; it's about changing what legacy sales, distribution, customer service, and product groups do in the new digital age. It's about bringing big data analytics, mobile, social, marketing automation, cloud computing, and the app economy together to launch new products and services. We're seeing new titles in this digital revolution, new responsibilities, new business models, and major shifts in technology spending.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - July 22, 2014
Sophisticated attacks demand real-time risk management and continuous monitoring. Here's how federal agencies are meeting that challenge.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.