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1/19/2006
12:49 PM
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Rocket Scientist Seeks Job Via eBay

He's looking for a position working on space applications, unmanned aerial positions, or at a golf manufacturing company. So far, he's gotten no offers, but lots of unsolicited advice.

Frustrated because hunting for work the old-fashioned way proved fruitless, a recent engineering grad is seeking a new job--and asking prospective employers to bid on his salary--via an auction on eBay.

"Hello, I am seeking an employer for my engineering services," John Davis wrote in his eBay posting. "After a summer of job hunting to such places as Northrop Grumman, Boeing, Lockheed Martin, and Raytheon as well as Callaway Golf and Taylor Made Golf I was only contacted for one interview…I hope that there is someone out there that takes this seriously as I am an extremely dedicated worker who just needs to get his career going."

Davis wrote that he's a recent graduate of the University of California at San Diego, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering. "I graduated in June 2005 with a GPA of 3.021," he noted.

In his eBay auction listing, which began Monday and ends on January 27, Davis set the starting bid at $46,725.75. So far, there have been no bids for Davis's services. He's hoping to snare a position at an aerospace company working on space applications or on unmanned aerial vehicles, or at a golf manufacturing company. ("I am an extremely avid golfer," he adds.)

Davis's salary expectations come in at the lower end of the scale. According to a National Association of Colleges and Employers survey, 2005 starting salaries for aerospace engineers averaged $50,993. Aerospace engineers who graduated from the University of Michigan in 2004 received starting salary offers of $49,986, according to The Wall Street Journal.

Davis's listing has already attracted some unsolicited job-hunting advice on Digg.com, which started a discussion thread after posting a link to his eBay auction. "I think his presentation is overall good but could improve. He sends negative vibes when he tells us about all the companies he applied for and wouldn't give him a job. I think having a photo of him in a suit would be better than a casual t-shirt. It would give him a more professional look," wrote a user who identified himself as "erkan."

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