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Security Tips, Podcast, And Sale

In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: 7 Lessons Learned From IT Security Trial
2. Today's Top Story
     - EMC Fills Major Security Hole With RSA
     - FAQ: What Will EMC Do With RSA?
     - EMC Confirms Plans To Buy RSA In $2.1B Deal
3. Breaking News
     - Survivor Accounts Released In 9/11 Podcasts
     - SCO's Legal Setback Should Help Linux Users Breathe Easier
     - Analysts Don't See Big Problems In Apple's Options
     - Accidental Tech Entrepreneurs Turn Their Hobbies Into Livelihoods
     - Cell Phone Talkers As Bad As Drunk Drivers
     - Net Neutrality Battle Shifts To Full Senate
     - Microsoft's WGA Sued As 'Spyware'
     - Brief: Apple Updates iTunes To Plug Security Hole
     - Office 2007 Delay May Foreshadow Vista Push-Back
     - Brief: New Trojan Takes On Mac OS X
     - Microsoft Shuts Off Vista Beta 2
     - UBS Trial: Defense Suggests Witness Altered Evidence
4. Grab Bag
     - Flashpacking Clicks With Great Outdoors (CNN.com)
     - Social Networking For Bookworms (WSJ.com)
     - Wireless America: Public Wi-Fi Hotspots (ABC News)
     - Silicon Valley Racing Ahead With Electric Cars (CNN.com)
5. In Depth: Apple And The Digital Living Room
     - Apple's Next Big Thing: Home Entertainment
     - The Job-Less Factor
     - Music Phones: What Has Apple Got Up Its Sleeve?
     - Media Distribution Rights: Here Come The Judges (And Congress)
     - The Complicated Web Of Content Licensing
     - New Digital Media Patent Could Upset Apple Cart
     - Blog: Fight For Your Entertainment Rights
6. Voice Of Authority
     - Microsoft Making Spyware?
7. White Papers
     - Web Server Monitoring
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quotes Of The Day: Liberty

"I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than to those attending too small a degree of it." — Thomas Jefferson

"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." — Benjamin Franklin

"But a Constitution of Government once changed from Freedom, can never be restored. Liberty, once lost, is lost forever." — John Adams

"It is seldom that liberty of any kind is lost all at once." — David Hume

"Let every nation know, whether it wishes us well or ill, we shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe, to assure the survival and success of liberty." — John F. Kennedy


1. Editor's Note: 7 Lessons Learned From IT Security Trial

Over the last several weeks, InformationWeek has been covering the trial of a former UBS PaineWebber systems administrator, Roger Duronio, who's accused of writing and setting off a highly destructive logic bomb at his former employer as revenge for not receiving the maximum yearly bonus. The government prosecution contends that Duronio was not only looking to wreak havoc, but also to profit by purchasing securities whose value would rise if the company's stock went down—the theory being that the company's stock would tank as a result of the security problem that prevented traders from doing their work.

The trial provides an enlightening perspective on the damage such attacks can cause, as well as a raft of security lessons that all IT organizations must learn if they're going to avoid becoming victims. In my blog entry, I discuss in much greater detail, and with specific examples, my take on the top seven security lessons corporations need to learn, which are highlighted below:

1) If you want to make it as difficult as humanly possible for hackers—whether employees or outsiders—to ply their trade, your company needs to have bulletproof security policies and practices.

2) Don't underestimate the lengths a hacker or person seeking revenge will go to in order to prove their point or carry out their plan.

3) You can't be too wary of disgruntled or otherwise suspicious employees.

4) The effects of a major attack can be far-reaching and long-lasting, even after the forensics pros have gone home and the remediation work is done.

5) Even a hacker who's successful at damaging systems and impairing business can be susceptible to stupid behavior that points back to him or her.

6) When it comes to security—and in fact all IT work—choose your vendors carefully.

7) IT security problems—aside from the direct financial damage to a business they inflict—can be a public relations nightmare for any company, and even worse for a financial services firm.

Be sure to check out our special page devoted to InformationWeek's complete coverage of the ongoing UBS computer sabotage trial.

And for more thoughts on data security and what to do about it, you can read Larry Greenemeier's blog, where he ponders where this is all going and what we have learned. While you're there, don't miss his attached inaugural podcast interview with several security experts.

Tom Smith
Tsmith@cmp.com


2. Today's Top Story

EMC Fills Major Security Hole With RSA
EMC's decision to spend nearly $2.1 billion for security vendor RSA promises to reshape the competitive landscape of the storage and infrastructure-management segments of the IT industry.

FAQ: What Will EMC Do With RSA?
EMC's move to acquire RSA for $2.1 billion certainly caught many off guard on Friday.

EMC Confirms Plans To Buy RSA In $2.1B Deal
The deal is the third large-scale union between a storage vendor and a security company over the past year.


3. Breaking News

Survivor Accounts Released In 9/11 Podcasts
"I wanted to crawl into my fire helmet." Firefighter Mickey Kross describes a fierce wind lifting him up amid the collapse of the North Tower in a podcast from the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation.

SCO's Legal Setback Should Help Linux Users Breathe Easier
A judge's decision to dismiss 182 of the company's 294 claims against IBM reduces the chance that SCO will prevail, one analyst says.

Analysts Don't See Big Problems In Apple's Options
In the world of improper stock-option grants, the irregularities Apple disclosed last week are small compared to what other companies are dealing with.

Accidental Tech Entrepreneurs Turn Their Hobbies Into Livelihoods
InformationWeek interviewed five accidental entrepreneurs, including the founders of del.icio.us and Digg and the author of the blog Dooce, to find out how they freed themselves from the paycheck-to-paycheck grind.

Cell Phone Talkers As Bad As Drunk Drivers
Three participants rear-ended the simulated car in front of them. All were talking on cell phones, and none were drunk, according to a new study. And oh yeah, using a hands-free device didn't change the results.

Net Neutrality Battle Shifts To Full Senate
The fact that the committee tied on the amendment is considered an indication that the Senate may also be split and that conditions are ripe for a dogfight.

Microsoft's WGA Sued As 'Spyware'
The lawsuit asks for class-action status on claims that Microsoft's WGA software misled users as to its true purpose, failed to obtain consent before installing, and transmitted data to the company's servers.

Brief: Apple Updates iTunes To Plug Security Hole
Apple Computer this week updated its iTunes music store software to fix a critical security flaw that could let attackers grab control of a PC or Mac.

Office 2007 Delay May Foreshadow Vista Push-Back
Microsoft's recent announcement that Office 2007 would be delayed is causing some analysts to speculate about a domino effect hitting Vista.

Brief: New Trojan Takes On Mac OS X
A security firm said it found an exploit against one of the five Mac OS X flaws just patched by Apple Computer.

Microsoft Shuts Off Vista Beta 2
The closure, slated for Friday, June 30, comes because the preview has reached its copy limit. Meanwhile, users are being urged to activate their Beta 2 copy in order to receive RC1 of the operating system when it's delivered later this year.

UBS Trial: Defense Suggests Witness Altered Evidence
Despite being accused of altering evidence, forensics specialist Keith Jones stood firmly by his earlier testimony that whoever brought down the UBS PaineWebber network had to do so from inside Roger Duronio's home. Duronio is the systems admin on trial for the attack.

All Our Latest News

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat With 'The More Things Change'
EMC acquires RSA Security, Microsoft delays Office 2007, CA delays financial results, and more.

Larry Greenemeier With 'Online Banking's Best Friend'
Banks take a close look at online security.

John Soat With 'RFID In The Real World'
Treasure Island Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas is using RFID technology to track the flow of alcohol in bars.

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-----------------------------------------

4. Grab Bag

Flashpacking Clicks With Great Outdoors (CNN.com)
There's a new type of backpacker roaming the globe—the flashpacker.

Social Networking For Bookworms (WSJ.com)
Social networking and book retailer sites are rife with lists of readers' favorite material, allowing people to compare notes on taste and compatibility.

Wireless America: Public Wi-Fi Hotspots (ABC News)
Looking for public wireless Internet access? Check out our interactive Wi-Fi map.

Silicon Valley Racing Ahead With Electric Cars (CNN.com)
Silicon Valley thinks it can do what Detroit couldn't—create a thriving business selling electric cars by tapping the Bay Area's engineering expertise and culture of innovation.


5. In Depth: Apple And The Digital Living Room

Apple's Next Big Thing: Home Entertainment
Sure, the company's on a roll. But does Apple have what it takes to repeat the success of the iPod in this notoriously fragmented venue?

The Job-Less Factor
Industry analysts evaluate Apple's chances with and without Steve Jobs at the helm.

Music Phones: What Has Apple Got Up Its Sleeve?
Rampant speculation about the possibility of an iPhone in the making has reached new heights in recent weeks.

Media Distribution Rights: Here Come The Judges (And Congress)
Consumer watchdog groups are sounding the alert about pending restrictions on media content usage.

The Complicated Web Of Content Licensing
The movie industry is afraid—very afraid—as it ponders the functionality promised by new technologies hovering on the horizon, and that fear could be trouble for Apple.

New Digital Media Patent Could Upset Apple Cart
ZapMedia Services, which owns the patent for what some view as a digital rights management platform, has put it up for sale.

Blog: Fight For Your Entertainment Rights
If you own an iPod or MP3 player; yearn for a music-enabled phone; download, share, and mix songs and video; or even if you just want to listen to your music or watch your videos in relative peace, take heed. Pending legislation could make the simplest exercise in legal home media use more cumbersome than you could ever imagine.


6. Voice Of Authority

Microsoft Making Spyware?
A California man has put his lawyer on a case that others have only been yakkin' about: Microsoft's Windows Genuine Advantage anti-piracy program/software is smelly, stinky, sneaky spyware.


7. White Papers

Web Server Monitoring
This white paper introduces Web server monitoring, explaining its importance and describing various monitoring concepts and types. A set of common Web server problems are enumerated, along with methods of monitoring to detect and/or prevent these conditions.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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