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7/25/2014
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Microsoft Faces 4 Big Challenges

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella is riding high with analysts and investors -- but look at the remaining hurdles.

Microsoft Office For iPad Vs. iWork Vs. Google
Microsoft Office For iPad Vs. iWork Vs. Google
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It's been an eventful few days for Microsoft, but new CEO Satya Nadella appears to have emerged with investors still on his side. Last week, he announced plans to lay off 18,000 workers. This week, his company announced earnings that would have been unequivocally strong had it not been for profit losses tied to its $7 billion Nokia Devices and Services acquisition, which accounts for two-thirds of the layoffs. Despite the tumult, and thanks to the quarter's stellar cloud and server revenue, Microsoft's stock has held steady since the job reductions were announced; within striking distance of $45 per share, it's also up more than 20% since Nadella took over.

But that doesn't mean Microsoft has nothing to worry about. The company had plenty of strong financials to crow about during the most recent quarter, but Nadella's popularity hasn't just been about numbers. It's also been about his willingness to admit that Microsoft faces an uphill battle in many markets, notably smartphones and tablets. By initiating layoffs, Nadella has taken a big step toward installing the "challenger mindset" he says his company needs -- but many steps still remain. Here are four pressing questions Microsoft and its new CEO must still face.

1. Will Nokia fit inside Microsoft?
Over the last week, Microsoft execs have gone out of their way to emphasize that the company is scaling down its device efforts. Yes, it will still make devices, because Windows Phone needs the help and because Microsoft wants devices that show off what its cloud services can do. But Nadella clearly knows some investors are leery of Microsoft's hardware ambitions, and he and other senior leaders have appeared determined this week to circumvent new concerns.

[For more insight on Microsoft's device strategy, see Nadella's Windows 9 And Device Plans, Explained.]

"We're not in hardware for hardware's sake," Nadella said during this week's earnings call.

That sounds good -- but what does it mean for Nokia? Microsoft execs spoke optimistically this week about Windows Phone growth in emerging markets, but they conceded that low-cost (and thus low-profit) devices drove most of the sales. Nadella said that, to generate high-end demand, Microsoft will create devices that "light up" Microsoft's digital services, such as Cortana, OneNote, and Office Lens. Will it work? Time will tell, but we'll know more after we see Microsoft throw its efforts behind a new flagship phone.

In the meantime, Microsoft will have to contend not only with Android, which is particularly dominant in the low-margin markets where Windows Phone has some traction, but also with the iPhone. Apple's smartphone could pose a particular challenge to Nadella's plan to situate Windows as the premier smartphone OS for productivity. Apple devices are already popular in the enterprise, could enjoy revitalized consumer growth when rumored phablet models arrive this year, and now have the backing of IBM's enterprise software and salesforce.

2. Will Microsoft's hybrid cloud synergies continue to click?
Nadella's cloud-focused strategy looked particularly promising after this week's earnings report; Microsoft said commercial cloud revenue was up 147% year-over-year and is on pace for a full-year total of more than $4.4 billion. Moreover, execs said the cloud momentum -- which includes products such as Office 365, Azure, Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, Dynamics CRM, Lync Online, and Intune -- isn't cannibalizing its on-premises products.

"We don't see it as a zero-sum," Nadella said this week.

Indeed, Microsoft also reported server products were up 14% from the same quarter last year. The implication is that hybrid cloud flexibility is helping customers to find the right balance

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Michael Endler joined InformationWeek as an associate editor in 2012. He previously worked in talent representation in the entertainment industry, as a freelance copywriter and photojournalist, and as a teacher. Michael earned a BA in English from Stanford University in 2005 ... View Full Bio

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WaqasAltaf
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WaqasAltaf,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 6:32:38 AM
Re: Nokia
SusanFourtane

"Nokia has nothing to do with Microsoft anymore. This is Nokia's Website after it sold its Nokia Devices & Services division to Microsoft: http://company.nokia.com/en "

Thanks for removing the misconception. I also thought that there is no more separate Nokia after MS's acquisition.
WaqasAltaf
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WaqasAltaf,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 6:27:11 AM
Re: Nokia continues being a healthy company
Thomas, 

"Microsoft start making products that as so good I have to buy them, instead of products that I have to buy because everyone else uses them."

Isn't the everyone using factor indicator that the products are good enough or is it that you seem to disagree with the product quality despite masses accept it ?
WaqasAltaf
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WaqasAltaf,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 6:23:09 AM
Impressed with the cloud apps
I haven't used many of MS's cloud apps but sharepoint and lync seems to be working great for me esp. link. Just got reminded that it is the same old Microsoft trying to climb the uphill. I think if similar products are invented on a regular basis, surely the synergies will continue to click. 
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 3:12:20 AM
Re: Nokia continues being a healthy company
@Micheal in my personal view does it not affected nokia over all as the things which were a hallmark are not their domain any more but other entities are still comming out with their name. I think it was not a good decision for nokia but a booster for MS. Since long nokia was my favourite but they did not travel in the right direction and suffered.
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 3:06:13 AM
Re: Nokia continues being a healthy company
@Thomas I agree with you there. I have been a victim of this for quite some time. We have a linux base sytem in our working place, mobiles are total different entity, home user are windows based and so on and so forth. I basically like linux due to its less prone to malware and viruses but cannot help myself in the fight of these biggies to what to choose and what not.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
7/25/2014 | 6:46:32 PM
Re: Nokia continues being a healthy company
Nadella's off to a good start but I'd like to see Microsoft start making products that as so good I have to buy them, instead of products that I have to buy because everyone else uses them.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
7/25/2014 | 2:48:37 PM
Re: Nokia continues being a healthy company
Yes, Susan, great point, and one we could have highlighted more clearly. Microsoft didn't buy Nokia outright; it purchased Nokia's device business. What Microsoft didn't buy still operates under the Nokia name as a seperate company.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 1:22:46 PM
Re: Nokia
Whoopty, 

Nokia has nothing to do with Microsoft anymore. This is Nokia's Website after it sold its Nokia Devices & Services division to Microsoft: http://company.nokia.com/en 

-Susan 
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 1:08:18 PM
Nokia continues being a healthy company
MDMConsult, 

Nokia has nothing to do with Microsoft anymore. Nokia sold its Devices & Serices division to Microsoft and that was the end of that story. Now Nokia is focusing on its three other businesses.

Nokia continues being a healthy company with its other three divisions: Nokia Networks, Nokia Technologies, and HERE. Nokia Devices & Services was only one fourth of Nokia and the only division that Nokia sold. 

All the misundertanding about this comes from the fact that people don't usually make it clear and for that reason there is a misconception that Microsoft bought the whole Nokia, which is not true. 

It would be more accurate to always say Nokia Devices & Services division. 

-Susan 
Whoopty
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Whoopty,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 12:47:21 PM
Nokia
Nokia certainly has a better chance of fitting in at Microsoft now that it's 18,000 jobs lighter!
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