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7/26/2014
08:36 AM
Michael Endler
Michael Endler
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Microsoft's Nadella: More Than Talk

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella proves he can be a man of action with the biggest layoff in company history and other concrete steps to reshape Microsoft. Now what?

Microsoft Office For iPad Vs. iWork Vs. Google
Microsoft Office For iPad Vs. iWork Vs. Google
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

They say talk is cheap, but that's not necessarily true if you're Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Microsoft stock is up more than 20% since he took over in February and has reached heights never attained under predecessor Steve Ballmer. Microsoft released lots of products during that period, but if you look at what people were really responding to -- at the things for which Nadella was responsible -- it was Nadella's language.

Now it's more than talk. With the announcement of 18,000 layoffs, Nadella has shifted into action. He's no longer reshaping, tweaking, and re-contextualizing what Steve Ballmer left behind, or making the sorts of moves that can remain invisible to outside observers. He's now begun remaking Microsoft according to his vision, and in so doing he's moved to a new stage of leadership, one where actions will increasingly speak louder than words.

It's a big step up from his early days as CEO. Nadella's been justly praised, but it's hard to know how much different Microsoft's product line would look if Ballmer were still in charge. On his way out, the former CEO reportedly gave the go-ahead on Office for iPad, for example, and one assumes Microsoft would have continued to beef up Azure under Ballmer, just as it has under Nadella. That's not to say Nadella hasn't exerted his authority. He reportedly axed the Surface Mini at the eleventh hour, and a lot of the cloud momentum Nadella's currently hyping stems from work he oversaw in earlier roles.

[Does Satya Nadella have Microsoft back on track? Read Microsoft Faces 4 Big Challenges.]

Still, almost everything Microsoft released during Nadella's early reign was already well into development under Ballmer. Nadella didn't bring new products; he brought new packaging for those products, new strategic sensibilities, and a new business vocabulary. His poetic delivery and hipster attire contrast sharply with Ballmer's salesmanship and bombast, a PR victory all by itself.

But by early July, Nadella's rhetoric had begun to grow repetitive. He'd been recycling key talking points to developers, partners, and other key constituencies as he wound his way through Microsoft conferences and events. A recent press tour engendered a lot of goodwill. But as his description of a cloud-driven world full of personalized digital experiences grew more familiar, the topics he wasn'taddressing became more obvious.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

Before the layoffs, Nadella appeared almost pre-emptive in his references to first-party smartphones and tablets, for example. They were normally limited to enthusiastic platitudes about the Pro 3, or vague intentions to integrate Nokia and build the Windows Phone market, with help from partners. He seemed to bring up devices, not only to assure audiences that Microsoft hadn't forgotten about its challenges, but also to stop the conversation before it started.

Layoffs seemed inevitable; Microsoft was already undergoing a restructuring effort when Ballmer stepped down, and in absorbing Nokia's device business Microsoft took in some skills overlap that had to be consolidated. But it did not seem inevitable that Nadella would enact the largest job reduction in company history. Even not counting the Nokia layoffs, 5,500 other job cuts -- which included changes to the Windows team and its testing process -- constitute Microsoft's second-biggest layoff ever. It's not clear if these efforts to make

 

Michael Endler joined InformationWeek as an associate editor in 2012. He previously worked in talent representation in the entertainment industry, as a freelance copywriter and photojournalist, and as a teacher. Michael earned a BA in English from Stanford University in 2005 ... View Full Bio
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heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 11:56:22 PM
Re: Protracted Layoffs
It's the American way to fight something that's so wrong.  Let's not give up!
mrbillbenson
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mrbillbenson,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 9:44:44 PM
Re: Protracted Layoffs
Our government and large American domeciled corporations with and without global workforces have sold out the American worker. We'll be lucky if we are left any place at the table whatsoever. America is doomed.
sidmeka
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sidmeka,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 9:20:29 PM
Re: Protracted Layoffs
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/10/16/meet-cgi-federal-the-company-behind-the-botched-launch-of-healthcare-gov/
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2014 | 12:26:59 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
Agree.

 

>> With the announcement of 18,000 layoffs, Nadella has shifted into action.

Laying off people isn't action, otherwise, with all the layoffs in the last decade, everything would be "fixed" by now

 

 
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 10:08:34 AM
Re: An acquisition mistake?
Nokia like Motorola was very badly Indianized.   See my other comments

about the "competitive advantage of Indianization", it's a negative benefit.

NonIndianized companies like Samsung/Apple/Google will always whip the Indianized

company's ass.    Microsoft is currently less Indianized but will be, if Satya

gets his way.


See my other comments about Satya's "protracted layoff".

 

When a massive Indianizing company buys another Indianized company,

then the purchase will faciliate great many Indians jumping ship

into the new mothership, while the old ship will be discarded

with all the nonIndian workforce called "baggage".

The whole process will be called "painful but necessary"...

 

 
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 10:02:15 AM
Re: Eastern Indian Microcrap
The cost saving of IT Indianization is greatly overrated.

Firstly, Indian IT uses a lot of bait-switch tactics.

Secondly, Indian IT introduces a lot of IT moles to

monitor your company's critical functions.  Google

"Indian corporate spying"  this is endemic even in

India.

Thirdly, the cost savings are always temporary if at

all.   Long term competitive advantage will be critically

damaged by short term outsourcing IT because IT

is extremely critical.

 

I'll give you a few examples:

A. Target outsourcer CIO singing praises of Target's Indian IT,

then bang!  40 million credit cards hacked, CIO out on her ass.

B. Look at Obamacare website, outsourced to Indian contractors,

unusable and had to be reworked by Google engineers.

C. Look at Ebay, occupied by Indian engineers, hacked with

100+ million records stolen.

I could give you 100 examples if I have the time.

With 1 million Indian IT worker occupying American IT

jobs 50%, the devastation they are wrecking on American

companies and American IT workers' sanity are massive and

long term.

 
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 1:27:39 AM
An acquisition mistake?
I am just curious if Microsoft had to dump Nokia hardware, plants, employees, patents then why did they buy Nokia in the first place?
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 1:14:45 AM
Re: Eastern Indian Microcrap
@ Blair: I am not an Indian and also not in American IT. I am neither anti American nor anti Indian. Since I am neither benefited nor harmed by Indianization of American IT, I can share my neutral non biased non emotional perspective on this: Having visited both countries and visited their universities, I found Indian youth to be well ahead of their American counterparts. They are more hungry and thus more hardworking. And yes there are issues of work ethic. On the corporate side, yes Indian managers do prefer Indian talent. However think of this way, if American IT companies had not lowered their costs by hiring low cost Indian labor, they would have been uncompetitive globally in terms of Pricing.
JimP019
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JimP019,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 5:02:44 PM
Re: Microsoft layoffs
Still the question are the layoffs in the U.S. mainly or other countries???
SteveIrv
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SteveIrv,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 4:29:58 PM
Re: Eastern Indian Microcrap
Mr. Blair:

 

Travel much? Read much? Do you have any friends from outside your ethnic community?

Try what George of Seinfeld tried and get some friends from outside your own community. USA is a great place to do that. 

By your logic, East European Orthodox people shoudl be taking over our cloud support industry, Russians our search & ad industry, etc.. Or, are you only particularly paranoid about East Indians? You really believe this guy is a plant from Indian govt to take over the US? 

Chill out. Get a beer, take a ddep breath, and most importantly, get out more and meet people. All's well with the world. It's not as scary as you think. 

Peace...

 

 
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