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7/26/2014
08:36 AM
Michael Endler
Michael Endler
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Microsoft's Nadella: More Than Talk

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella proves he can be a man of action with the biggest layoff in company history and other concrete steps to reshape Microsoft. Now what?

Microsoft Office For iPad Vs. iWork Vs. Google
Microsoft Office For iPad Vs. iWork Vs. Google
(Click image for larger view and slideshow.)

They say talk is cheap, but that's not necessarily true if you're Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. Microsoft stock is up more than 20% since he took over in February and has reached heights never attained under predecessor Steve Ballmer. Microsoft released lots of products during that period, but if you look at what people were really responding to -- at the things for which Nadella was responsible -- it was Nadella's language.

Now it's more than talk. With the announcement of 18,000 layoffs, Nadella has shifted into action. He's no longer reshaping, tweaking, and re-contextualizing what Steve Ballmer left behind, or making the sorts of moves that can remain invisible to outside observers. He's now begun remaking Microsoft according to his vision, and in so doing he's moved to a new stage of leadership, one where actions will increasingly speak louder than words.

It's a big step up from his early days as CEO. Nadella's been justly praised, but it's hard to know how much different Microsoft's product line would look if Ballmer were still in charge. On his way out, the former CEO reportedly gave the go-ahead on Office for iPad, for example, and one assumes Microsoft would have continued to beef up Azure under Ballmer, just as it has under Nadella. That's not to say Nadella hasn't exerted his authority. He reportedly axed the Surface Mini at the eleventh hour, and a lot of the cloud momentum Nadella's currently hyping stems from work he oversaw in earlier roles.

[Does Satya Nadella have Microsoft back on track? Read Microsoft Faces 4 Big Challenges.]

Still, almost everything Microsoft released during Nadella's early reign was already well into development under Ballmer. Nadella didn't bring new products; he brought new packaging for those products, new strategic sensibilities, and a new business vocabulary. His poetic delivery and hipster attire contrast sharply with Ballmer's salesmanship and bombast, a PR victory all by itself.

But by early July, Nadella's rhetoric had begun to grow repetitive. He'd been recycling key talking points to developers, partners, and other key constituencies as he wound his way through Microsoft conferences and events. A recent press tour engendered a lot of goodwill. But as his description of a cloud-driven world full of personalized digital experiences grew more familiar, the topics he wasn'taddressing became more obvious.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

Before the layoffs, Nadella appeared almost pre-emptive in his references to first-party smartphones and tablets, for example. They were normally limited to enthusiastic platitudes about the Pro 3, or vague intentions to integrate Nokia and build the Windows Phone market, with help from partners. He seemed to bring up devices, not only to assure audiences that Microsoft hadn't forgotten about its challenges, but also to stop the conversation before it started.

Layoffs seemed inevitable; Microsoft was already undergoing a restructuring effort when Ballmer stepped down, and in absorbing Nokia's device business Microsoft took in some skills overlap that had to be consolidated. But it did not seem inevitable that Nadella would enact the largest job reduction in company history. Even not counting the Nokia layoffs, 5,500 other job cuts -- which included changes to the Windows team and its testing process -- constitute Microsoft's second-biggest layoff ever. It's not clear if these efforts to make

 

Michael Endler joined InformationWeek as an associate editor in 2012. He previously worked in talent representation in the entertainment industry, as a freelance copywriter and photojournalist, and as a teacher. Michael earned a BA in English from Stanford University in 2005 ... View Full Bio
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JimP019
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JimP019,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 9:35:27 AM
Microsoft layoffs
Is Nadella doing layoffs only in the U.S.?Do these layoffs include other countries?If it is in the U.S. he needed to think about unemployment for these indiviuals.Microsoft migh start making a profit,but the U.S. taxpayer will be loosing monies because of it!!
premjan
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premjan,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 9:53:36 AM
Re: Microsoft layoffs
They are mostly Nokia employees but some Microsoft too.
JimP019
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JimP019,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 5:02:44 PM
Re: Microsoft layoffs
Still the question are the layoffs in the U.S. mainly or other countries???
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 10:29:42 AM
Protracted Layoffs
Microsoft has 80 billion dollars in cash. But ultimately, the employees are not mad at

layoffs,they are mad at the protracted layoffs.   The way the layoff is done makes it

rather clear:

A.  Nadella wants employees (Americans) to infight and stab each other

B.  Nadella wants the best employees (Americans) to go away

C.  Nadella wants the survivors (Americans) to be weakened.

 

Which begs the question: why?

I'll answer why:  Nadella is doing the classic practice of "software corp raider"

perfected by elite Indian upper managements throughout Silicon Valley.

Target are companies like:

A. Cisco, Qualcomm, VMWare, Intel, Motorola, Nokia, Sun, Adobe

B. IBM, Oracle, Microsoft, LinkedIn,Amazon

C. Facebook, Google, Twitter, Apple

The tactics are the same everywhere:

1. Layoff thousands of American engineers (sometimes by smal cuts),

2. Nearly concurrent hiring Indian new grads by thousands, or outsource

to Indian contracting companies.

End Result A. tier companies are nearly completely Indianized, or

defunct: ~70% Indian engineers

B tier companies are Indianized: ~30-60% Indian engineers

C tier companies are generally newer and last refuge of

American nerds: <30% Indian engineers

 

Guess what: C tier companies are being targetted by Indian diversity guru

Vivek Wadhwa for not welcoming women in tech, while he carefully

spare A tier and B tier from his indignation.  Ask these companies their

diversity data, you will find a huge majority of Indian enginers.

 

What does this have to do with Nadella?  Is Nadella innocent?

No.  1 month ago, even as Nadella was planning for this current

protracted layoff, he renewed 100 million dollar IT contract with

Indian outsourcing giant Infosys.  It's remarkable that Nadella thinks

India test engineers could be retrained to become

competent software engineers (bypassing much more stringent

interview process), yet the laid off American test engineers could

not be retrained in IT!

With the current layoff, Nadella also announced that Microsoft's

x0,000 vendors, many of them Indian outsourcing giant like

Infosys, Tata CS, HCL, wipro, individual contractors could

keep working for 18 month and take 6 month break.  These Indian

contractors are given MORE time than the laid off American

employees, and they are given a lot more ramp-up training

than American new grads, who have to pass much more stringent

interview process!

 

Now I have to go back to H1b visa.  Indian outsourcer giants

take vast majority of total H1b visas every year for the last 10+ years! 

Infosys is being sued for discriminating against Americans,

and abusing H1b visa.  Yet they are getting contracts from US

government as well as tech giants like Microsoft, Cisco, IBM.   Why?

 

Answer: Years of H1b visa abuse by Indian outsourcers have enabled

importing almost 1 million Indian software "professional"s into the US,

devastating American IT workplace of only 2 million

software jobs.  These million strong invaders ganged up on American

nerds, discriminated against American nerds,

only hired Indians/promoted Indians, stole credits, stoled client information,

spied on company's IT, stole projects, force Americans to work doubletime

(American time and Indian time), etc. 

 

By doing this, legions of Indians rose to middle and upper ranks in US tech

giants, further rewarding this nepotistic nonAmerican practice by indians.

Because Indian economy remain in doldrums, and Indian outsourcing

industry is doubling their invasion zeal, they are planning to bring in

another million Indian software "experts" to occupy American IT 100%.

 

Do you think it's wrong?  If so, go to "brightfuturejobs.com" to stop this!

If you think this is fine:  then look at:

A. Target outsourcer CIO singing praises of Target's Indian IT,

then bang!  40 million credit cards hacked, CIO out on her ass.

B. Look at Obamacare website, outsourced to Indian contractors,

unusable and had to be reworked by Google engineers.

C. Look at Ebay, occupied by Indian engineers, hacked with

100+ million records stolen.

 

Indian IT are very good bait-and-switch and very good Big Brother

spying on your email and cutting Americans' tech talent pipeline. 

Not so good at delivering.  

Think what it would be like if American IT is 100% Indianized,

in another 10 years. 

 
sidmeka
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sidmeka,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 9:20:29 PM
Re: Protracted Layoffs
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/10/16/meet-cgi-federal-the-company-behind-the-botched-launch-of-healthcare-gov/
mrbillbenson
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mrbillbenson,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 9:44:44 PM
Re: Protracted Layoffs
Our government and large American domeciled corporations with and without global workforces have sold out the American worker. We'll be lucky if we are left any place at the table whatsoever. America is doomed.
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 11:56:22 PM
Re: Protracted Layoffs
It's the American way to fight something that's so wrong.  Let's not give up!
BlairMuse
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BlairMuse,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 1:01:57 PM
Eastern Indian Microcrap
Another reason not to buy Microsoft EI-Microcrap. Eastern Indians and other Asian companies that take over American companies simply demolish them, starting with the Americans, and move a majority of the potions overseas to "rebuild the brand" which is always a complete BS story. They also do so to harbor as much information on Americans as possible to sell it to other countries and companies yet we are too stupid as a society to see this. Don't give India any more of you hard earned money. India is a country that prides it's self with inequality and their citizens are rather inhumane people, borderline animals. At least when you buy Apple a majority of the sale stays in the US Market. Do your research!!!
SteveIrv
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SteveIrv,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 4:29:58 PM
Re: Eastern Indian Microcrap
Mr. Blair:

 

Travel much? Read much? Do you have any friends from outside your ethnic community?

Try what George of Seinfeld tried and get some friends from outside your own community. USA is a great place to do that. 

By your logic, East European Orthodox people shoudl be taking over our cloud support industry, Russians our search & ad industry, etc.. Or, are you only particularly paranoid about East Indians? You really believe this guy is a plant from Indian govt to take over the US? 

Chill out. Get a beer, take a ddep breath, and most importantly, get out more and meet people. All's well with the world. It's not as scary as you think. 

Peace...

 

 
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2014 | 1:14:45 AM
Re: Eastern Indian Microcrap
@ Blair: I am not an Indian and also not in American IT. I am neither anti American nor anti Indian. Since I am neither benefited nor harmed by Indianization of American IT, I can share my neutral non biased non emotional perspective on this: Having visited both countries and visited their universities, I found Indian youth to be well ahead of their American counterparts. They are more hungry and thus more hardworking. And yes there are issues of work ethic. On the corporate side, yes Indian managers do prefer Indian talent. However think of this way, if American IT companies had not lowered their costs by hiring low cost Indian labor, they would have been uncompetitive globally in terms of Pricing.
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 10:02:15 AM
Re: Eastern Indian Microcrap
The cost saving of IT Indianization is greatly overrated.

Firstly, Indian IT uses a lot of bait-switch tactics.

Secondly, Indian IT introduces a lot of IT moles to

monitor your company's critical functions.  Google

"Indian corporate spying"  this is endemic even in

India.

Thirdly, the cost savings are always temporary if at

all.   Long term competitive advantage will be critically

damaged by short term outsourcing IT because IT

is extremely critical.

 

I'll give you a few examples:

A. Target outsourcer CIO singing praises of Target's Indian IT,

then bang!  40 million credit cards hacked, CIO out on her ass.

B. Look at Obamacare website, outsourced to Indian contractors,

unusable and had to be reworked by Google engineers.

C. Look at Ebay, occupied by Indian engineers, hacked with

100+ million records stolen.

I could give you 100 examples if I have the time.

With 1 million Indian IT worker occupying American IT

jobs 50%, the devastation they are wrecking on American

companies and American IT workers' sanity are massive and

long term.

 
lawler
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lawler,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/26/2014 | 1:42:13 PM
Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
Michael, it should be a concern to you that you judge Nadella as a man of action only when he fires people.

There are many methods by which a CEO can demonstrate activity. In my mind, firing thousands of people is not one of them.

Note that I don't mean that (in this case) the company might well need to dismiss those employees (especially the ex-Nokia employees) that are in parts of the business in which it's no longer planning to be involved.

But take care with your usage of the word action that includes mass firings. It shouldn't.

Frankly, I'm also worried about Nadella's inexperience in the top role.  As we all know, this is his first CEO position. It's in a large, notable technology company. And it's a company that he's been a part of for over twenty years.

This first large-scale mass firing may be a more reckless move characteristic of a brand-new CEO looking to make his mark (and thinking, incorrectly, as you do, that he can be a "man of action" by firing thousands of people.)

I wish that he had seasoned himself with CEO positions at other tech firms before taking the reins at Microsoft.

Also, don't forget the board tactic, as common as it has been over the past 30-40 years, of bringing in a new CEO, having him do the tasteless task of mass firings, and then dismissing him and bringing in the long-term choice for CEO.

That way, the remaining staff get to associate their bad feelings about the firings with their fired CEO, and get to feel good about the new guy coming in.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2014 | 12:26:59 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
Agree.

 

>> With the announcement of 18,000 layoffs, Nadella has shifted into action.

Laying off people isn't action, otherwise, with all the layoffs in the last decade, everything would be "fixed" by now

 

 
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 11:59:18 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
Can't agree with you more!   Plus the way the layoff
 is carried out, calculated to drive out the best people
 from Microsoft.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 9:48:21 AM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
@heartpuppy

Does 'best' equal 'most expensive'?
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/28/2014 | 3:32:36 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
With his protracted layoff, Nadella is trying to squeeze out the "best" Microsoft workers.  By "best", I mean the American nerds who do their job well and get paid well and are ill-equiped to handle the vast office-politicking credit-stealing job-stealing PPT-touting nepotistic net-sniffing IT "expert" invasion army, 1 million strong, brought in from India into American IT workforces(total about 2 million jobs).

Admit it, American nerds focusing on doing their software jobs should not be expected to put up with this kind of infighting and uncertainty(intentionally unleashed by Nadella), and will likely look for alternative employment opportunities.  Nadella's Darwin process will only leave the Indians (protected by Nadella and gang) to be declared the heir to the Microsoft's 80 Billion dollar cash hoard.   Indians could use this hoard to launch another million "experts" from slums to take over American IT 100%...  Isn't it beautiful?

Yeah beware your email and all office communication is being spied on by your Indian invading force.  I'm sure a low caste American like you would appreciate Indian Big Brother's taking care of all your IT needs for the next thousand years.

 
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 10:48:23 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
@heartpuppy,

Did you work from MSFT in the past? Why the aggression?
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2014 | 9:41:45 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
am I aggressive because i said anything false?

I thought the facts are pretty clear.  The way this layoff is conducted is very strange.  

fact 1: Microsoft has 80 billion dollar cash.

fact 2: Microsoft continues to employ 90000 contractors including Tata consulting services, Infosys, Wipro and HCl, all giant Indian contractors hijacking the H1b visa program for many years in a massive way.  Only 1 month ago Microsoft renewed an IT contract with Infosys.   Apparently Microsoft laid-off techies are not given a chance to retrain to take care of their own IT.

fact 3: giant Indian contractors imported 1 million H1b IT experts into the US in the last 15 years, where the entire marketplace only has spots for 2 million IT jobs.  What happened to the 1 million American IT workers replaced by the H1b visa labors?  They trained their replacement and faded into unemployment or became real estate agent.  those trying to stay in software industry,  are turned down by Indian hiring managers as "overqualified", "poor culture fit", "too old".

fact 4: Computer Science majors in many American schools are occupied by Indian students.   American grads from respectable American universities could not compete with new Indian grads in the IT workplace.  why?  Indian grads could get into a contractor job easily through one of those giant Indian contract firms, given on-the-job training, their career made by getting on one of the ladders under the protective wings of Indian hiring managers and middle managers, maybe even Mr Nadella himself.   American grads get none of these perks, they are just laughed out interviews by the Indian managers, called inexperienced, poor culture fit, stupid and lazy.

fact 5: the way Satya did his grand job cuts: It's protracted, painful and encourages infighting among nonIndian permanent workforce; at the same time it left the 90,000 contractor workers nearly intact.   Mark my words, in a few months, there will be a giant backdoor opened for these Indian temp workers to become full time employees (without pesky interviews that kept so many American grads out of Microsoft) or a giant push to outsource to India.   It's such an old trick used by Cisco, Ebay, VMware & Qualcomm and other tech companies.  It's unmistakably effective, as these companies' engineering departments are now almost completely Indian.

 

fact 6: rumor says entire teams of Indian testing engineers under Indian managers received the coveted promotion to become software engineers (under the curren testing-development job role integration reorg).   Because these are already often 90% Indian teams, they compete only with each other in performance and have nothing to fear but trust that the Great One has their back.  So while everyone else fear for their jobs, the Indians at Microsoft are enjoying gyms, relaxation ,defacto promotions and office politics' spoils.   They are eagerly awaiting the next stage of takeover, where they could become 100% of Microsoft, to inherit the empire and its cash hoard.

American IT industry is besieged by Indian invaders on every front.   Currently at occupation rate of 50%, Indians are 30-40% Microsoft's permanent engineering workforce; more Indians than Americans are employed in IBM; Cisco,Qualcomm's engineering are nearly completely occupied by Indians.  Go take a look at VMWare and Cisco's headquarters and many IT departments for financial/insurance industries, and then tell me if I'm too aggressive in pointing out the quiet IT invasion or simply telling the facts as it is.

In another 10 years at this rate, the occupation rate will go from 50% to 100%.   Now when Indian contractor CGI screwed up Obamacare website,  there are still Google's engineers to the rescue.  In another 10 years, the way Indians keep importing more H1b experts, there will be NO nonIndian software engineer to be found.   Send an email, visit some website, some Indian big brother will be sniffing on the network, you will never know.   80+% executives in Indian companies admitted to using network monitoring, bugging, and employing spies on their competitors.   I do not expect that they will change their stripes when the imported Indians became the 100% Lords of America's information system.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 11:41:22 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
@heartpuppy,

I was referring to your tone more than the content of your message. It came off to me that you were upset with MSFT, which is why I asked if there was a reason why. I didn't say anything you mentioned was inaccurate.
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/1/2014 | 9:07:06 AM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
Sorry my tone is not always the nicest.  The way this critical industry is going, is going to be a massive national insecurity issue.  The way the American young nerds are being shoved under the bus while experienced American nerds are being squeezed out the industry, and everyone seems not to see it.   That does upset me.

If Microsoft is turned into a 100% cuckoo hatchery, American IT, even global IT will be undefendable from this brood of hypocritical, racist, nepotistic, self-serving cuckoos.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
8/19/2014 | 5:22:41 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
@heartpuppy,

I think most people see it & understand what's going on. They just feel powerless. Even worse, they choose NOT to speak out for fear of retribution.
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/19/2014 | 5:49:18 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
I don't think most Americans understand how dangerously critical the IT situation is.   It's not just a job issue, IT only has 2 million jobs and it's already 50% Indian occupied through the H1b abuse.   The critical problem comes from the dried up American talent pipeline and the national security issue down the road.   We are seeing IT drastically transforming every traditional industry( including policing, military, health, accounting and law).   Yet we are writing off our own young's future and allowing our IT to be taken over by a foreign force with secret agenda, and who has no regard for American values of democracy and equality.   

I'm also concerned about the now widespread practice of low end legal process outsourcing into India.   I antipate a day when Indian law school grads will be taking American bar exams and begin practicing as American lawyers (using the IT game plan to squeeze out next generation of American lawyers).   When the Indian lawyers reach a critical mass, they will be able to defend and legitimize this giant take-over of American democracy, which began with exporting millions of entry-level white collar jobs, now into the stage of a quiet IT take-over without resistance, to end with the take-over of American law, legislature and government.


Their game plan is brilliantly and discretely executed judging from the general lack of American awareness.  I got to admire their audacity.   Back to Microsoft, the rounds of layoffs are still ongoing.   Watch Cisco (recently announcing another round of layoff of 6000 people) for a taste of Microsoft's future.  Cisco is in advanced stages of layoff-worldwide-hire-Indians-at-the-same-time and its cash hoard of 50 billion (mostly offshore) dollars will be raided by its Indian cadres, who are clamoring for the Indian CTO to be promoted to the CEO spot.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
8/25/2014 | 6:58:45 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
@heartpuppy,

Wow I didn't know about the legal outsourcing. That's a little odd, isn't it?
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/27/2014 | 11:19:46 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
Check out this org:  connect-goal.com/

 

They claim that the growth of legal outsourcing industry in India is exponential.
 Very likely it's true: google "india legal outsourcing". You will find lots of good in-depth coverage, some from NYT.
 Yet no one is raising alarms, likely because the lawyers have the same sense of security and complacency as the software engineers 10 years ago.   If they saw what happened to the American software engineers and connected the dots, they'd probably think twice about this "exponential" outsourcing of this key American industry central to American democracy.

Microsoft also outsource its IP legal department. google "wipro microsoft outsource IP".  It has become a zombie American brand with 80 billion dollar cash to be robbed blind by its suave PPT masters and turned into a giant cuckoo hatchery.  Same fate as befallen Cisco, check out Cisco's recent announcement (bradreese blog: every division with falling or stagnant sales and apparently preparing to sack the survivor nonIndian engineering leader of one of the few growth divisions).   Entire America will suffer the same fate if unchecked.

 

 
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 10:32:38 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
@heartpuppy,

Wow I've heard of Wipro before & didn't know they're offshore. I just checked their website to see what they specialize in. They claim to have over 143k employees. That seems a little exaggerated but probably not since they're publicly traded. Interesting.
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/1/2014 | 10:08:03 AM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
Wipro Limited (formerly Western India Products Limited) is a giant Indian contractor.   

check out www.foreignlaborcert.doleta.gov/pdf/H-1B_Selected_Statistics_FY2014_Q1.pdf

Currently it alone has 10,000 H1b visa labor in the US.  Over the past 15 years, all the Indian contractor giants imported ~1000,000 Indians into the US to occupy and "upgrade" American's IT brain.

BTW, Chase was hacked last week.  What does Chase, Target, Ebay, Michaels, SuperValu, Healthcare.gov, California healthcare exchange have in common?  They all laid off their American workers and outsourced their IT department to Indians and India; and they all were breached or failed miserably.   Admit it, Indians don't care about American information security and American jobs.  They care about money.

An Indian guru came to an American saying: You are dumb.  Let me replace your brain with a new IQ=200 brain...  For rupees!    Does American take him up on his generous offer?   Yeah, it's hugely embarrassing, but we did.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
9/22/2014 | 9:58:09 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
"They care about money..."


@heartpuppy,

Unfortunately, that's the case for everyone, Americans included. The Indian businessman just found a soft spot in the American businessman's wallet: savings. An they capitalized greatly. If anything, you could say that's capitalism at its best.
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/23/2014 | 10:44:09 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
We could say it's capitalism at its best and idly watch the process to continue.  But the patient will shortly die from this cancer of the brain, and the death will be fast, incomprehensible and catastrophic.   Exponential growth always beats linear growth, everytime and everywhere.   Americans won't even know what is hitting them.   Look at JPM Chase, Ebay, Target, Homedepot, Albertson, Goodwill & Cisco.   The underlying cause of information insecurity and future insecurity are hardly touched by any media.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
9/25/2014 | 10:37:05 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
@heartpuppy,

I agree with the insecurity point. People overlook it because they feel insecure about technology in general. I don't think there will ever be a point when you can feel 100% safe when it comes to your information.
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/26/2014 | 9:42:23 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
The latest shellshock and heartbleed are only the tip of iceberg when it comes to American insecurity.  Lack of diversity/duoculture in computer systems and the aging of American nerd workforce are both driving American IT off a cliff.  The newer generation the millenials are being deprived of entry level white collar jobs, call center jobs, accounting jobs, but especially dangerously, excluded from IT career.  This will have catastrophic consequences if left to continue.
pcharles09
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pcharles09,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2014 | 11:28:56 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
"The newer generation the millenials are being deprived of entry level white collar jobs, call center jobs, accounting jobs, but especially dangerously, excluded from IT career."

How exactly are they being 'excluded'?
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2014 | 1:20:10 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
@Lawler It's hard to think of Nadella as an enforcer hired by the board to fire thousands of people and then parachute out. Companies usually bring in an outsider for that kind of grim business. Nadella seems emotionallly invested in the complex task of streamlining Microsoft for the long haul. He doesn't fit the profile of a hatchet man.
heartpuppy
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heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/28/2014 | 2:39:31 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
Nadella does not fit the classic profile of "outsider hachet man".  but fit the profile of "Indian insider hachet man with secret agenda".   His college buddy (from an obscure second rate Indian university that produced NO big CEOs before Nadella ) became Nokia CEO, and carried out extensive layoffs in Nokia during his career at Nokia.   The 2 friends seem to follow the same playbook, a playbook used extensively at other Indianized American high tech outfits like Cisco and VMWare.   Where you see rounds of small/big layoffs and attrition aimed at nonIndian workforce, coupled with extensive outsourcing to India and Indian companies.  In addition these companies also preferred hiring and promotion of Indian workers in America, resulting in a huge Indian technical population (sometimes 8/10) in their US corporate headquarters.   

Cisco's indianization strategy:

 http://www.networkworld.com/article/2264760/lan-wan/cisco-quietly-downsizing-through-outsourcing.html

Qualcomm's Indianization strategy:

http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2013/jan/09/citylights1-engineers-dislike-h1b-bosses-gloat/

http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2011/mar/09/citylights1-american-engineers-short-supply/

IBM now more Indian workers than the US:

http://nypost.com/2013/10/05/ibm-now-employs-more-workers-in-india-than-us/

 

 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2014 | 3:02:29 PM
Re: Let's be a little more serious about the word 'action.'
So to distill your message, you're positing that Nadella's grand plan is to lay off large numbers of Microsoft's US citizen tech workers, replace a significant number of those people with (presumably) less expensive Indian tech workers, then bail out of the company?
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Ninja
7/27/2014 | 1:27:39 AM
An acquisition mistake?
I am just curious if Microsoft had to dump Nokia hardware, plants, employees, patents then why did they buy Nokia in the first place?
heartpuppy
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50%
heartpuppy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/27/2014 | 10:08:34 AM
Re: An acquisition mistake?
Nokia like Motorola was very badly Indianized.   See my other comments

about the "competitive advantage of Indianization", it's a negative benefit.

NonIndianized companies like Samsung/Apple/Google will always whip the Indianized

company's ass.    Microsoft is currently less Indianized but will be, if Satya

gets his way.


See my other comments about Satya's "protracted layoff".

 

When a massive Indianizing company buys another Indianized company,

then the purchase will faciliate great many Indians jumping ship

into the new mothership, while the old ship will be discarded

with all the nonIndian workforce called "baggage".

The whole process will be called "painful but necessary"...

 

 
RZIMMERMANN
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RZIMMERMANN,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/28/2014 | 12:52:37 AM
Microsoft Nokia division is not based here in US
It is located in Finland and majority of workers are there. Please keep that in mind before generalizing issues. OK now carry on with your pet themes.
Lorna Garey
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50%
Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2014 | 12:29:34 PM
AD integration
Michael, In terms of "It did not make sense to add a wholly unproven product category -- devices -- as a would-be strategic cornerstone." That's debatable -- I have heard that Microsoft is extending AD with things like federation and hybrid cloud integrations, which is smart for keeping enterprise IT on board with its own hardware and Windows. Identity and directory management are an important trump card. 
Charlie Babcock
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Charlie Babcock,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2014 | 5:44:52 PM
Microsoft is now a server company
Although Microsoft still aspires to be a device company, I think it's inevitable that its future lies as a server company. it's last successful business device was the Windows PC. Which means that it's now a server company, both Windows Server in the enterprise and the Azure Cloud, delivering services to other people's smart phones and mobile devices. 
Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 11:12:35 PM
Re: Microsoft is now a server company
@ charles - I thnk that you are correct the Azure product is doing well and so is Lync.  And I think Lync can drive some device sales too.  Which could help to drive Microsoft device sales.
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