Software // Information Management
Commentary
8/17/2006
02:25 PM
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BI And More At LinuxWorld

Open source took center stage in the tech world this week as the spotlight turned to the LinuxWorld conference in San Francisco. Among the vendors of interest to Business Intelligence Pipeline readers were Adaptive Planning, IBM and JasperSoft.

Open source took center stage in the tech world this week as the spotlight turned to the LinuxWorld conference in San Francisco. Among the vendors of interest to Business Intelligence Pipeline readers were Adaptive Planning, IBM and JasperSoft.Adaptive Planning said its software became the first open source performance management product available on SourceForge.

Adaptive Planning provides collaborative performance management software for budgeting, forecasting, and reporting to the middle market. SourceForge, developed by VA Software, is a central hub for organizing and managing development teams working in different locations.

Adaptive Planning runs on an Oracle database, and works with the Pentaho business-intelligence platform. The Express version is free, and the enterprise edition is $1,000 per user for an annual subscription.

JasperSoft had its sights on the enterprise with its LinuxWorld announcement this week. The company launched a more robust professional version of its open-source JasperServer.

JasperServer Professional is built on top of the basic version, and is integrated with JasperReports. The beefier server is designed to give organizations the ability to create their own BI reports, including control over layout, data columns, groups, summaries, formatting, labels and titles.

In addition, it's certified to run on the major software platforms, such as BEA WebLogic, Oracle Application Server, IBM WebSphere and Microsoft SQL Server. The pro version is sold under an annual commercial license that starts at $2,500, including support. Customers get access to all the product's source code.

And finally, IBM made it clear that open source has a strong place in its enterprise portfolio, saying that it would put more product development and sales resources into building markets.

Among its ongoing projects is tuning the Linux kernel to run faster on IBM's new Cell processor, and expanding its open-source Web server business.

IBM made a big push last week into the enterprise content management market by agreeing to buy FileNet. But the crown jewel in the pending purchase is FileNet's integration of document management with business process management. IBM sees the technology as helping to expand the use of its products in the enterprise.

Drop me an email to let me know what you think.

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