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3/27/2012
11:32 AM
Doug Henschen
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Big Data Talent War: 10 Analytics Job Trends

A gap is emerging among data-savvy professionals, with big-data-analysis and predictive skills trumping routine business-intelligence and information-management talents.
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Trend 4: A Gap Emerges In The Talent Pool
A generation gap is emerging within the BI, analytics, and information management workforce, says Accenture Analytics executive Stacy Blanchard. The difference between "next-gen" and "old-gen" professionals isn't about age so much as attitude. Next-gen workers are more likely to be open to open source tools and cloud computing, and Accenture's research indicates they're also looking for different perks than their counterparts. "They want to be sure that they're using the latest, greatest technology and access to certifications and training that gets them up-to-speed with the market and more marketable," Blanchard says.

The potential downside for employers is that this new breed is less loyal to the corporation and they're sensitive about their working environment. "If they're not collaborating with like-minded colleagues and they don't see how the insights they're developing are actually having an impact on the business, you're going to lose them," she warns.

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dbell947
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dbell947,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/15/2013 | 5:40:05 PM
re: Big Data Talent War: 10 Analytics Job Trends
Very interesting. My shop is definitely bucking the trend of the offshoring of "back office low level" projects. Virtually all our staffers with Big Data or advanced programming/ statistics/ app dev skills are being discouraged from applying those skills in favor of manual report generation/ extract generation/ and low level data cleaning clerk typist duties. All the more complicated (or interesting) projects are outsourced or contacted out. This appears to be used to justify low pay scales (i.e., help desk pay for BI) in lieu of paying more for higher talent. The strategy is to outsouce the big ticket talent to show how cheap such skills are in order to reduce pay scales for such talent. Then, reduce the pay skills and work environment for all. So far that has worked in that many higher skilled staff have either quit or are looking at working elsewhere. What we have left are staffers who know nothing about fundamental data structures, algorithms, OOD, statistical mechanics, etc. Most are, at best, hack programmers in SQL and as much Java as one community college course can teach. Definitely degenerates the workplace environment and lowers the paycheck values.

Wonder if this is true of other shops?
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
3/28/2012 | 9:40:33 PM
re: Big Data Talent War: 10 Analytics Job Trends
Editors note: the following comment was received by e-mail and posted here on his behalf:

Great piece, Doug. In our work with manufacturers, equipment data in time series format is ever increasing and the move toward what we call G«£Industrial Big DataG«• is the trend. With better analytics, manufacturers are saving data at higher fidelity so time series signals from equipment can be gigabytes a day per equipment type. Trying to analyze this data over time when there are terabytes of data presents real challenges. Thanks for bringing Industrial Big Data to everyoneG«÷s attention.

Brian Courtney
General Manager, Operations Data Management
GE Intelligent Platforms
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