Software // Information Management
Commentary
7/6/2010
07:39 PM
Curt Monash
Curt Monash
Commentary
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EMC Is Buying Greenplum

I don't think adding a rich parent adds much of a reason to buy from Greenplum. But if you're the type who's nervous about smaller vendors -- well, Greenplum now isn't so small.

EMC is buying Greenplum. Most of the press release is a general recapitulation of Greenplum's marketing messages, the main exceptions being (emphasis mine):

The acquisition of Greenplum will be an all-cash transaction and is expected to be completed in the third quarter of 2010, subject to customary closing conditions and regulatory approvals. The acquisition is not expected to have a material impact to EMC GAAP and non-GAAP EPS for the full 2010 fiscal year. Upon close, Bill Cook will lead the new data computing product division and report to Pat Gelsinger. EMC will continue to offer Greenplum's full product portfolio to customers and plans to deliver new EMC Proven reference architectures as well as an integrated hardware and software offering designed to improve performance and drive down implementation costs.Greenplum is one of my biggest vendor clients, and EMC is just becoming one, but of course neither side gave me a heads-up before the deal happened, nor have I yet been briefed subsequently. With those disclaimers out of the way, some of my early thoughts include:
  • I wish my clients would never buy each other, but it's inevitable.
  • I don't think anybody evaluating Greenplum should be much influenced by this deal one way or the other. (Whether they will be is of course a different matter.)
    • EMC tends to run its bigger software acquisitions in a fairly hands-off manner. There's no particular FUD (Fear/Uncertainty/Doubt) reason why this deal should stop anybody from buying Greenplum software.
    • I also don't think adding a rich parent adds much of a reason to buy from Greenplum. But if you're the type who's nervous about smaller vendors -- well, Greenplum now isn't so small.

  • Greenplum Chorus could, in principle, work with non-Greenplum DBMS. That possibility suddenly looks a lot more realistic.
  • The list of analytic DBMS vendors with an appliance orientation is pretty impressive, including:
    • Oracle, with Exadata
    • Microsoft, partially
    • Teradata
    • Netezza
    • Now EMC/Greenplum, at least partially
    • Weaker players such as:

  • Greenplum is something of a specialist in large databases. EMC has to love that.
  • Greenplum's weakness is concurrency.
  • Greenplum's "polymorphic storage" is a good fit for a storage vendor with appliance-y ideas.
  • And finally -- I think that even software-only analytic DBMS vendors should design their systems in an increasingly storage-aware manner, and have been advising my vendor clients of same. I'll blog that line of reasoning separately when I get a chance, and edit in a link here after I do.

    Related links:

    I don't think adding a rich parent adds much of a reason to buy from Greenplum. But if you're the type who's nervous about smaller vendors -- well, Greenplum now isn't so small.

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When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
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