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2/11/2014
09:06 AM
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Is Your Company Running A Data Dump?

Hoarding useless data makes analytics harder. Companies like Paxata say their brand of analytics lets non-data experts turn data landfills into useful info.

Image courtesy of St. Louis County.
Image courtesy of St. Louis County.

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anon4483228301
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anon4483228301,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/18/2014 | 12:36:33 PM
Re: Data dump by another name
right,

good 

<a  href="http://www.fmed.bu.edu.eg">information</a>
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Ninja
2/12/2014 | 8:10:46 AM
Re: E-discovery
There's big money in e-discovery. At least for the lawyers and vendor making e-discovery tools. The enterprise being targeted is the loser because of time, effort and cost to dig through all of that stuff.

I suspect that many companies are keeping too much data because they don't have a strategy well enough defined to outline a use or purpose for that data. Then, since storage is relatively cheap, they keep everything.

The flip side of that coin are the companies run by executives who've been bitten before by lawsuits and keep everything for CYA purposes.

Either way, it's to the company's detriment to keep absolutely everything. Decide what you need and keep that. Much better and more effective than keeping everything and eventually (or not) deciding what you need.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
2/11/2014 | 1:45:54 PM
E-discovery
We hear all the time about companies spending millions on e-discovery requests and lawyers coming up with a 'smoking gun' from some obscure data source that no one thought to delete. To wit: Chris Christie as Jersey digs for Bridgegate evidence.

Do you think the 'keep everything forever' mindset is going to play into this, making money for e-discovery software firms and consultancies and teams of lawyers?
Michael Fitzgerald
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Michael Fitzgerald,
User Rank: Moderator
2/11/2014 | 1:17:59 PM
Re: Data dump by another name
I had the same thought about creating a smell for bad data.  We all know data decays over time. It would be fun, and telling, to have data records take on a different hue as they aged, perhaps.  You could then apply a little data air freshener. Or put it in a data coffin...
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
2/11/2014 | 10:45:59 AM
Re: Data dump by another name
"Data lake" doesn't do the practice justice. Lakefront property fetches a premium. No one's looking to drain lakes (for the most part) or reduce their size. For those subjected to driving through Staten Island, think Arthur Kill. Local residents couldn't close up that dump fast enough. Perhaps if rotting data smelled (a perverse market opportunity here?), companies wouldn't hoard so much of it.  
Laurianne
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50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
2/11/2014 | 10:27:54 AM
Data dump by another name
EMC likes to use the term "data lake" to describe the vast amount of data customers are grappling with. That sounds more pleasant -- but at some companies, data dump must certainly be more accurate.
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
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