Software // Information Management
News
1/29/2013
04:34 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

New Supercomputer To Target Climate Research

Department of Energy spending $17 million on a new supercomputer for climate and biological research.

IBM Smarter Cities Challenge: 10 Towns Raise Tech IQs
IBM Smarter Cities Challenge: 10 Towns Raise Tech IQs
(click image for larger view and for slideshow)
The Department of Energy is spending $17 million on a new supercomputer that will be used by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab for climate and biological research.

The DOE's Office of Science awarded the contract to Atipa Technologies, a division of Microtech Computers that builds high-performance Linux systems for government agencies and universities.

The new supercomputer is designed to operate at a peak processing speed of 3.4 petaflops, 20 times faster than PNNL's four-year-old Chinook supercomputer. That should put it into the top 20 supercomputers in the world, according to PNNL.

[ Big data has value that's often not reflected in the books. Read What's Your Big Data Worth? ]

The system will be comprised of 196,000 Intel processing cores combined with Intel's Xeon Phi coprocessors, based on the company's Many Integrated Core architecture, and has 2.7 petabytes of usable storage.

The supercomputer will be optimized for climate and chemistry simulations and biological analyses. It will be used for research in climate and environmental science, chemical processes and biology-based fuels, according to PNNL.

In biology, "more computing power is like having more pixels in a picture," said Scott Baker, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab's biology science lead, in a written statement. "We'll be able to look at proteins and complex biological interactions more realistically. This will allow us to better understand and control organisms like microbes so that we can develop new renewable fuels."

The new computer is scheduled to be operating by October. About 400 scientists use the lab's Chinook system.

The DOE operates three of the top 10 supercomputers in a ranking of the top 500 supercomputer sites. Topping the list is Oak Ridge National Lab's Titan, which is rated at a peak of 27 petaflops.

InformationWeek is surveying IT executives on global IT strategies. Upon completion of our survey, you will be eligible to enter a drawing to receive an Apple 32-GB iPad mini. Take our 2013 Global CIO Survey now. Survey ends Feb. 8.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
J. Nicholas Hoover
50%
50%
J. Nicholas Hoover,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/30/2013 | 7:22:26 PM
re: New Supercomputer To Target Climate Research
I'd like to see a more comprehensive climate research strategy from the national labs. It seems like there are a dozen federal supercomputers already focused on climate research. Perhaps these initiatives are all important and separate, but perhaps they overlap. We need big data collaboration, not big data silos.
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest - September 10, 2014
A high-scale relational database? NoSQL database? Hadoop? Event-processing technology? When it comes to big data, one size doesn't fit all. Here's how to decide.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.