Software // Information Management
Commentary
11/11/2008
07:49 AM
Neil Raden
Neil Raden
Commentary
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Process Intelligence, CEP and Operational BI

In case you haven't heard it yet, here comes a new product category: Process Intelligence. But what does it mean? All of these terms overlap: Operational BI, Pervasive BI, Operational Intelligence, Process Intelligence, BAM, CEP (Complex Event Processing), Decision Management, Decision Services. Arguments over definitions tend to be vigorous for two reasons...

In case you haven't heard it yet, here comes a new product category: Process Intelligence. But what does it mean? All of these terms overlap: Operational BI, Pervasive BI, Operational Intelligence, Process Intelligence, BAM, CEP (Complex Event Processing), Decision Management, Decision Services. Arguments over definitions tend to be vigorous for two reasons. First, the taxonomy of product classes tends to be pretty leaky and second, the stakes are so low.

The reason it is important to get some clarity on the definitions is that the wider BI industry (and I don't know what to call it) is driven by marketing, not by function or requirements. Software vendors invent things, acquire or get acquired by other vendors and give names to the combined capabilities they possess. Then it's packaged and sold to companies.There is a vigorous debate going on Sandy Kemsley's blog Column2 about the meaning of CEP and whether it is different from Process Intelligence, a concept John Patton and I have been developing.

As far as I'm concerned, CEP is a loosely defined set of capabilities that can "abstract" events in real-time and make decisions based on rules. Process Intelligence is designed to take BI a few steps farther by reading process logs directly, adding robust timing calculations, understanding process steps (preferably directly from BPMN/BPEL) and using an object model that is based in distributions of event/values instead of discrete instance values.

Process Intelligence, like BI, is inherently analytical. But if PI becomes actionable, how does it differ from CEP? At this point, I think they are pretty close, with the only difference being how events are "abstracted" for action. CEP uses a pattern language, which is a result of its original application on Wall Street.

So Process Intelligence and CEP derive from different sources, but they're pretty close and getting closer.In case you haven't heard it yet, here comes a new product category: Process Intelligence. But what does it mean? All of these terms overlap: Operational BI, Pervasive BI, Operational Intelligence, Process Intelligence, BAM, CEP (Complex Event Processing), Decision Management, Decision Services. Arguments over definitions tend to be vigorous for two reasons...

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
The Agile Archive
The Agile Archive
When it comes to managing data, donít look at backup and archiving systems as burdens and cost centers. A well-designed archive can enhance data protection and restores, ease search and e-discovery efforts, and save money by intelligently moving data from expensive primary storage systems.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Tech Digest September 24, 2014
Start improving branch office support by tapping public and private cloud resources to boost performance, increase worker productivity, and cut costs.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
InformationWeek Radio
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.