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1/10/2014
10:42 AM
Doug Henschen
Doug Henschen
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With Watson, Is IBM Riding Right Wave?

IBM bets that its Watson technology will ride the cognitive-computing wave to commercial success -- while rivals gear up for the connected-computing era.
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IBM CEO Ginni Rometty is doubling down on IBM's Watson bet with another $1 billion in investment.
IBM CEO Ginni Rometty is doubling down on IBM's Watson bet with another $1 billion in investment.

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D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2014 | 11:06:40 AM
Which Wave Will Be More Important?
So are we entering the connected-computing era or the cognitive-computing era? What's your view on which one is more important, more real, and which one will have bigger implications over the long term?
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2014 | 11:51:41 AM
Re: Which Wave Will Be More Important?
Sounds like at a minimum you're impressed with IBM's courage in pursuing this path with Watson.
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2014 | 12:08:00 PM
Re: Which Wave Will Be More Important?
Salesforce.com's "vision" isn't a vision at all. It's a me-too proposition. Lots of vendors are slapping their own label on the Internet of Things (GE: Industrial Internet, Cisco: Internet Of Everything, etc.), and now Salesforce.com has Internet Of Customers. It's not all that impressive. At least IBM is sticking its neck out. We'll see whether the big commercial opportunities will follow.
ANON1247573258647
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ANON1247573258647,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/10/2014 | 12:42:41 PM
Re: Which Wave Will Be More Important?
IBM is far from alone in cognitive computing.  It is the same contact behind Siri, Google Now, and the forthcoming Microsoftt personal assistant.  It is also behind much of the robotics research.  I would also argue that the Internet of Whatever is not a competing concept, but rather a complementary one that will allow cognifitive computing to accumulate more and more data to cogitate upon.
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2014 | 1:01:12 PM
Re: Which Wave Will Be More Important?
These sound like examples of tapping into cognitive computing capabilities, but what other big tech vendor are trying to bring cognitive computing capabilities to the enterprise? I asked John Gordon of the IBM Watson Group this question yesterday and he couldn't name any. He did mention a few universities that are doing research in this area. What I meant is that IBM is virtually alone in trying to commercialize cognitive computing.
WKash
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WKash,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2014 | 2:56:37 PM
Re: Which Wave Will Be More Important?
The organizations to watch may not be tech companies but tech consumers such as the CIA, which continues to use vast computing power to identify relevant signals in an ever changing world of data noise. The fact that the CIA chose Amazon Web Services over IBM for a $600 million cloud infrastructure contract is telling: Even with IBM's leadership with Watson and cognitive computing, there are other factors at play in arriving at useful answers. 

I'm also skeptical that by vacuuming up data from the Internet of Everything, that Salesforce will be able to deliver much more than just a lot of data about data.
sbalakrishnan029
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sbalakrishnan029,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/10/2014 | 12:50:08 PM
Re: Which Wave Will Be More Important?
Connected-Computing era is a reality and in place, though lot of connected and slow processing all put together, which need to improve upon, while cognitive computing era is still yet to get up and running or should i say in the works....So both has a long way to go to gain a lot in terms of its maturity and hope will be able to engage a lot of people in society overall...
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2014 | 2:29:10 PM
Re: Which Wave Will Be More Important?
Here's the link: I don't think we'll be able to wring full value out of the connected computing world without cognitive computing, machine learning, whatever you want to call it. The Internet of things creates just too many data points to consider all the possible connections to analyze. In that way it's a classic IBM play: yes, we all see this big idea out there, you'll need our stuff to actually do what you imagine.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2014 | 12:07:00 PM
Cool and Crazy
"Watson understands natural language. It generates and evaluates hypotheses. It adapts to and learns new information. It's even learning to see, to hear, and to offer visual answers."


^^Reminds me of Stepford Wives. Really neat technology that's also kind of scary.
Somedude8
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Somedude8,
User Rank: Ninja
1/10/2014 | 1:11:04 PM
An AI by any other name
Seems like every few years, some variation of AI is going to be The Next Big Thing, claiming that within a few years, we will have full on thinking computers that don't require any programming blah blah blah.

Call me a cynic, but I have heard this song too many times to buy into it.

Besides, I am afraid of Skynet hehe!
oneilldon
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oneilldon,
User Rank: Strategist
1/10/2014 | 3:18:26 PM
On Watson, IBM believes its own message!
On Watson, IBM believes its own message!

I know this because IBM is putting money into the success cognitive computing, and the IBM CEO is beeting her job on it.

If successful, the biggest news is that IBM is plowin this field by itself so as a minimum it will have a ten year leap over the competitiion.

IBM Watson operates on a higher plane. It is a cut above. It is a game changer. Each IBM Watson advancement represents the successful completion of a Grand Challenge including Blue Gene with its computational speed, Deep Blue with its demonstrated mastery of chess, Jeopardy with its lightening quick and accurate quiz game responses, cognitive computing  and the promise of deep semantic discovery, cognitive systems now the inflection point of broad useful application, and the next challenge on the horizon which is to pass the U.S. Medical Examination.
oneilldon
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oneilldon,
User Rank: Strategist
1/10/2014 | 3:23:52 PM
IBM Watson Experimental Prototype Challenge: Supply Chain Risk Management Assurance
IBM Watson operates on a higher plane. It is a cut above. It is a game changer. Each IBM Watson advancement represents the successful completion of a Grand Challenge including Blue Gene with its computational speed, Deep Blue with its demonstrated mastery of chess, Jeopardy with its lightening quick and accurate quiz game responses, cognitive computing  and the promise of deep semantic discovery, cognitive systems now the inflection point of broad useful application, and the next challenge on the horizon which is to pass the U.S. Medical Examination. 

The question here is whether IBM Watson could be a game changing advancement in Program Acquisition for so long an area of unmet need and Supply Chain Risk Management Assurance now the center of risk and uncertainty in national security and global competitiveness in a shrinking globalized world.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
1/13/2014 | 5:27:29 PM
Re: IBM Watson Experimental Prototype Challenge: Supply Chain Risk Management Assurance
In meeting with a half dozen top health IT leaders last summer, I was surprised at the level of skepticism for Watson delivering value in medical diagnosis support. I don't expect Watson to make a diagnostic judgment, but does it seem far-fetched for such technology to have some role in suggesting probable diagnoses and treatments? 
oneilldon
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oneilldon,
User Rank: Strategist
1/13/2014 | 5:34:45 PM
Re: IBM Watson Experimental Prototype Challenge: Supply Chain Risk Management Assurance
Or second guessing an actual diagnosis by a real doctor? This seems quite likely.
kjenkins601
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kjenkins601,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/10/2014 | 4:32:17 PM
Watson
Some day in the future.. 20 - 30 years?? both waves will merge into a super network of super smart, self learning,  computers. They will learn from each other. New standards of information exchange will be developed. At some point, it will be on its own able to think and grow exponentially a million times faster than a human. The curve of AI will be a straight vertical line.  Good?  Bad?  time will tell but it will happen. 
D. Henschen
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D. Henschen,
User Rank: Author
1/10/2014 | 5:35:01 PM
Re: Watson
And then John Conner and Arnold Schwarzenegger will beam back from the future and do battle to destroy the chip that IBM invents that thinks like a human and takes over the world... sorry, wrong story line.
ChandanM383
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ChandanM383,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/13/2014 | 1:06:42 PM
Watson and Buisness Revenue Potential
 From business and revenue point of view, IBM is moving to a new area. I am not sure if this technology,  though remarkable, can generate enough revenue to sustain growth of large company,  like IBM. As IBM moving to a higher spectrum of technology for buisness growth, I am afraid they might neglect the base technology that supports the IBM's business revenue, growth and the customer satisfaction that comes with it.

 
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