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11/19/2013
08:06 AM
Jeff Bertolucci
Jeff Bertolucci
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8 Reasons To Hate Windows 8.1

Sure, it's an improvement over Windows 8. But for many PC users, Windows 8.1 is a clumsy hybrid that's a pain to navigate.
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That Start button? Meh...
As you've no doubt heard, Windows 8.1 brings back the Start button that graced the desktop from Windows 95 through Windows 7. But Windows traditionalists won't be pleased. Why? Because when you click (or tap) the new Start button in Windows 8.1, you're sent back to the Start screen. To find your programs, you have to click a down arrow at the bottom of the screen to launch the Apps view. 

Clunky, perhaps, but here's a trick to save an extra step: Go to the desktop, right-click on the task bar, and select Properties from the pop-up menu. Click the Navigation tab, and check the box next to 'Show the Apps view automatically when I go to Start.' If you use mostly desktop apps, be sure to check 'List desktop apps first in the Apps view when it's sorted by category.'  

Here's another tip: Right-click the Start button to see a menu of popular features, including Programs and Features, Task Manager, Search, Sleep, and Shut Down.

That Start button? Meh...
As you've no doubt heard, Windows 8.1 brings back the Start button that graced the desktop from Windows 95 through Windows 7. But Windows traditionalists won't be pleased. Why? Because when you click (or tap) the new Start button in Windows 8.1, you're sent back to the Start screen. To find your programs, you have to click a down arrow at the bottom of the screen to launch the Apps view.

Clunky, perhaps, but here's a trick to save an extra step: Go to the desktop, right-click on the task bar, and select Properties from the pop-up menu. Click the Navigation tab, and check the box next to "Show the Apps view automatically when I go to Start." If you use mostly desktop apps, be sure to check "List desktop apps first in the Apps view when it's sorted by category."

Here's another tip: Right-click the Start button to see a menu of popular features, including Programs and Features, Task Manager, Search, Sleep, and Shut Down.

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a.rosen
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a.rosen,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/27/2015 | 2:26:57 AM
Re: 8 Reasons to hate Windows 8.1 if you already hate it.
This "I'm a Linux holdout, but I love Win 8.1" post has me surprised at best... and curious if their employer isn't likely Microsoft.  Real Non-conformist holdouts refusing to convert to windows don't normally so uncritically embrace a 'new' OS bent on trying to track you, force you to login to their cloud, and control where you get apps from (for example the original MS Surface simply WILL NOT allow ANY install from anywhere but the Windows Store--not even FireFox--with no "option" to allow you otherwise).  Workarounds exist for most issues, (and hopefully they've changed their ways on newer MicroSoft devices) but they sure don't tell you about them, or make them easy to find.  And I haven't even mentioned yet, the uber-annoying "charms" bar that triggers needlessly & endlessly repeatedly depending on the PC you're using (a problem on most systems where the track-pad doesn't have VERY high and specific customizability) --And I'm not even someone who has any problem with 90% of the "hates" written in this article. 
AdamantineWolverine
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AdamantineWolverine,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/12/2015 | 4:26:29 AM
Re: 8 Reasons to hate Windows 8.1 if you already hate it.
First, I have to say that I am truly impressed by the quality of writing that I'm seeing here.  

It's certainly an improvement over the comments on YouTube where you have a lot of trolls posting rude comments while using poor grammar.  It could be because YouTube limits the size of comments to only 255 characters or so, thus forcing people to use word shortcuts.

     Regardless, my primary complaint regarding Windows 8 was the lack of a Start button. 

     I often complain about when they change the GUI out in a new version of software.  Thus, they force you to have to look online to figure out how to do something you knew how to do on the previous version of the software.

     For example, I was not particularly fond of the ribbon interface that came with Office 2007, as I had been used to the old menu system.  I knew the keyboard shortcuts and where to go to on the Menu system to find what I needed.  I had to relearn where all the buttons were in the ribbon interface.  Now that I am used to it, I'm not as offended by it.

     Windows 7 is an awesome OS.  It didn't stray far from Windows XP and Windows Vista when it came to where all the essential interfaces were.  Start -> Control Panel was just two clicks away, and you knew how to find it.

     Start -> All Programs and you have a familiar menu system showing all your installed programs.

     The start button was your key to doing just about everything you wanted on your computer.  When the start button was removed in Windows 8, it felt devastating.  Now I had to look online to figure out how to launch the start menu, how to use the Charms, and even how to shut the computer off.  It made me wonder "WHY!!!!????"

     I'm happy that the Start button has returned with Windows 8.1.  I do miss the old Start -> All Programs menu system, but you can configure that metro apps interface to have all the key items that you need to maintain the computer.

    I immediately add the Control Panel, Administrative Tools, and Desktop version IE onto my Start Menu and then I don' t hate it as much.   I haven't had any technical issues with Windows 8.1, but it may take me a while before I can say I like it.  In comparison, I loved Windows 7 as soon as I used it the first time.
GaryG961
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GaryG961,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/22/2015 | 6:29:52 PM
Re: OZLperez11,
Do you work for Microsoft?
emagnus@att.net
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emagnus@att.net,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/16/2015 | 11:25:49 PM
Re: This is america??
I remember the old DRDOS and MSDOS days we could change font colors, background colors, etc. Use batch files to manage data backups, and creating and OWNING my own data. How I miss those days! I never liked windows much and resisted using it as long as I could. I did build a large number of computers as the technology progressed and eventually accepted the inevitable windows monopoly. Windows 7 to me is something like the ideal. Yet here I am using windows 8.1 and, while the idea of putting finger smudges on the display is disagreeable, I am going to give it a shot. Its not the same as swiping my smartphone. If I don't like it after 60 days or so, I will probably try to revert to windows 7. I also don't like having to use my microsoft email address to login to windows. Whats the point of that? I suspect it is not to give me greater control of my activities. My dad was born in 1930, had a high school education, and was one of the most highly educated people I have ever known. I have met and worked with a few PhD level engineers and scientists who were bright ones alright, but not with the breadth of vision my father had as a lumber yard manager. He could produce architectural designs with pencil and paper with artistic flare because he had good teachers along the way, and calculate loads on structures because he was taught mathematics well, not because he was a savant. I am not sure how to characterize education and its products today...
Hefficide
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Hefficide,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2015 | 3:26:32 AM
Re: 8 Reasons to hate Windows 8.1 if you already hate it.
Very late to this party and with good reason. I began my Windows journey before there was Windows - back when Mr Gates gift to us was a C prompt and DOS. Once the GUI came along I was a Windows user by default - as were most consumers.


That is until Windows ME came out. At that point I reversed gears and ran XP on all of my PC's, ignoring newer versions entirely ( Sadly including Windows 7 which was a decent OS ).

When support for XP finally stopped I migrated to Linux and never looked back. In fact a year ago, if you would have mentioned Windows to me, I would literally have gagged a bit. I was honestly that against the product. My particular favorite Linux desktop environment was Gnome - which is controversial in the Linux world even now as not being "traditional" enough ( Familiar argument? ) but I found it fluid, visually appealing, and very easy to use.

A few weeks ago an opportunity arose for me to buy a new personal PC at a simply ridiculous price. A combination of a coupon and a one day sale left me with a high end PC for almost nothing out of pocket. The caveat? This PC came with Windows 8.1 preinstalled.

As I awaited my new computer, I had already created my Ubuntu Gnome install USB - that is how sure I was that I would be replacing the operating system on arrival. I planned to keep a small Windows 8.1 partition solely for the purpose of the rare chore of having to use a program that would only run in Windows - and had no viable Linux alternative.

Now it is three weeks later and there is not even a Linux partition on my machine. So far Windows 8.1 has worked perfectly ( something I could not even say for XP ). I do not find the Metro tiles menu to be confusing at all - in fact it is very reminiscent of the Gnome interface that I so adore in Linux. The fact that I can push a key and be on a more "traditional" desktop is simply a plus in my opinion. I utilize the traditional desktop simply as a task switching platform for the most part and keep no shortcuts on it at all. No clutter whatsoever. To me it is a beautiful design and a stable OS.

It is a shame that I came along right at the end of the party. Now Windows 10 looms and promises to be a one year free upgrade. It also promises to look a lot more like the Windows variants that I avoided like the plague during my years as an XP holdout. Unless Microsoft force feeds me the Windows 10 upgrade, I do not think I will opt for it. This version works for me as it is.

How much of the hatred of 8.1 is based in fear of change and that which is different I wonder? I also wonder what percentage of the people who hate 8.1 were around to go through the countless and endless problems that earlier Windows versions carried? How many lived in the days when a day without a blue screen of death was a rare and good day?

Compared to those years - this is Heaven. I think Microsoft finally got it right only for the masses to not quite catch on.

 
anon9418873852
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anon9418873852,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/15/2015 | 3:50:51 AM
Re: This is america??
AARP offere FREE classes for W8 as wll as any other computer and technology stuff(sending photos on smartphones?)-- for memebers (maybe for nonmembers too) all over the country.  It really isn't that hard and you don't need a college degree to learn.  What one really needs, I say from expereince, as I am 60+ is patiience, patience, patience, which by the way the Instructor also needs (also from experiene).
anon9418873852
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anon9418873852,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/15/2015 | 3:36:05 AM
Re: Windows 8.1 Pains
You can set it up to get the desktop on boot up on W8, 8.1
anon1173782452
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anon1173782452,
User Rank: Guru
3/15/2015 | 2:29:36 AM
Re: The Start stops most people
Yes I am a bit late to this discussion, but I FINALLY let go of XP, reluctantly, got a new Dell PC with Windows 8.1 and had to comment.

I don't mind the Start Screen, I kind of like it, BUT in orderto get to it, I have to click the up arrow from the list of Apps.  SInce I use a mouse, the Start menu, for me, is just like the desk top, So O'd like it to be ont top, first, always.

What I don't like is all the issues I am haveing with W8 are technical, so tomorrow I am taking it back to the store because I think it's my brand new $900 PC that is ust not fundioning properly.

 

 
anon1173782452
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anon1173782452,
User Rank: Guru
3/15/2015 | 2:22:18 AM
Re: How to cure all Windows 8 problems
I know this is more thn a yera old, but ran into this website when I seqrched for problems woith WIndows 8.1.  It was NOT your PC, given that I just boght a brand new Dell PC in order to get the new WIndows,.  I was quite happy with XP and will be returning this piece of c-machinery which has given so many problems.  I can easily adjust to the design, I was looking more for what you talk about, slow, continuos crashes and freezes, devices that will not wokr, although a check on Windosa assist cleared that ALL my devices would work, including an old monitor.


I am trying to discern if it is WIndows program or the PC.
LynnH760
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LynnH760,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/5/2015 | 9:35:15 PM
Re: This is america??
Alexandria, I absolutely concur with your comments.  They are extremely arrogant to attempt to force Windows 8.1 (or anything else) upon us.  We should be able to make our own decision.  I may be over 50, but I am far from stupid.  Furthermore, some who did not graduate from high school and/or college may have had to quit in order to make a living.  Nothing was handed to them on a silver platter.  That does not mean that one is NOT intelligent.  In many instances, life experiences teach more than so called "formal" education ever will (and I am not knocking "formal" education .... but don't stereotype people who do not have the opportunity).  The first time my laptop was updated to Windows 8.1, it caused it to crash!  Luckily, I had backups of Windows 8 and all over pertinent info.  It took time out of my schedule to fix the crash, which something these software engineers don't seem to be concerned about.  The next thing I know, my computer is being invaded and interrupted with messages in regard to updating Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 again.  This time the message is insistent that my computer is going to be updated to Windows 8.1 no matter what.  Well, guess what, I have some experience with computers.  Yes, hard for youngsters to believe, but I do.  Let's just say, it was a little complex, but I fixed the problem.  And, the answer to the question "Is this America" is the following:  This is NOT the America that my Father envisioned when he was fighting for this country and when he was stationed at Pearl Harbor fighting to rescue some of his fellow servicemen from the barracks which were being bombed.  I guess some these youngsters would have taught my Father "uneducated" because he had a high education and no college.  However, during testing, he beat out several others with college educations and became an air cadet (before the official "Air Force" came the air cadets) and became a licensed pilot. 
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