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11/19/2013
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Jeff Bertolucci
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8 Reasons To Hate Windows 8.1

Sure, it's an improvement over Windows 8. But for many PC users, Windows 8.1 is a clumsy hybrid that's a pain to navigate.
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Just how unloved is Windows 8's new interface? Consider this: One of Windows 8.1's hot new features is the ability to bypass the Live Tile user interface and boot directly to the traditional Windows desktop. It's a tacit admission by Microsoft that its ambitious goal of creating a unified interface for mobile and desktop devices hasn't exactly gotten a warm embrace from longtime Windows users.

That can't be good. Much has been written about the jarring distinction between Windows 8 and its predecessors, all of which had the same look and feel (with a few tweaks) dating back to Windows 95. Of course, change isn't necessarily a bad thing; it's often for the best, in fact, even when people resist it, which they usually do.

Windows 8 featured a new UI optimized for multitouch tablets, which Microsoft slapped on top of a crippled Windows desktop sans the Start button/menu. This one-UI-fits-all-devices approach backfired, resulting in confused end users, as well as wary enterprise uses unwilling to upgrade from earlier versions.

PC shipments began to plummet at around the same time that Windows 8 arrived. It's not fair to pin moribund PC sales entirely on Windows 8 -- for many global consumers, a tablet or smartphone is the better, cheaper choice -- but the hybrid OS was certainly a contributing factor.

A year after Windows 8's debut, Windows 8.1 is here. Is it better than its predecessor? Yes, but in small ways. The overall presentation is essentially unchanged, albeit with some needed improvements. You'll find a visual tour here.

If you're a Windows 8 hater, Windows 8.1 probably won't change your opinion of the OS. (It's worth noting that in addition to the Live Tile UI, Windows 8.x offers other enhancements, most notably faster startup times.) New features such as the return of the Start button and boot-to-desktop are welcome additions, but they might make Windows 7 users wonder: Why upgrade at all?

This doesn't mean that Windows 8.1 will fail. If touchscreen laptops and hybrid devices like Microsoft's own Surface Pro 2 prove popular with businesses and consumers, the operating system's touch-oriented UI and mobile-style apps might prove a winner in the long run. But for legacy desktops and laptops, Windows 8.x remains a hard sell.    

Here are eight reasons to hate -- or at the very least, dislike -- Windows 8.1. If you think the latest version of Windows is getting a bum rap here, let us know in the comments below.

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ChrisN432
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ChrisN432,
User Rank: Strategist
2/2/2014 | 11:01:46 PM
Re: Windows 8.1 Metro Apps
It seems the only way I can comment at all on this article is to reply to somebody else's comment, so.....

 

I got a windows 8 lapton just about 14 months ago. I freaking love it. Last month, I replaced my old and barely working desktop with a 23 inch all-in-one touchscreen from Gateway, and I love it too. I can tell you that if I had fallen for a windows 8 laptop without the touchscreen, I would have thown it out a window (pun intended) within a few days of getting it. In other words: With touchscreen -- windows 8 rocks. Without touchscreen -- windows 8 sucks.

 

Yes, there are things that you have to get used to being different, but what's new about that? I suggest going through some tutorials and downloading some tips and tricks apps or just looking up good tips and tricks on Google. Most things that have you frustrated will make you slap your forehead and say "Doh!" once you learn how to do them.

 

I have been using windows phone since windows phone 7 came out, and now I have a windows phone 8 device, and I love it too. My daughter, an iPhone user, said she would switch to Windows phone in a heartbeat except there are so many thinigs she does with her friends that require her to have an iPhone to do.

 

Bottom line: Only get Windows 8 or 8.1 if you've got a touchscreen, and give it a chance. If you have an open mind about the change, you'll most likely really like it. All those things you currently do using Windows 7 or earlier, you can still do the same way in desktop mode if you want.
ChrisN432
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100%
ChrisN432,
User Rank: Strategist
2/2/2014 | 10:47:22 PM
Re: Windows 8.1 Metro Apps
Just swipe down from the top of the screen to close your app. It's pretty simple, really.
EdM846
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0%
EdM846,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/28/2014 | 12:34:36 PM
I hate Apps
I am in the process of purchasing a new computer.  After reading about all the problems with Windows 8 & 8.1, I can not understand why they would put Apps on the OS for a computer.  If I want to use Apps, I would buy another IPad.  I don't want Apps on my computer!  Can you delete all those APPS?


It still urks me that I still have those anoying links to purchase programs on my Dell desktop even though I try to delete them, they seem to eventually pop back up.  The thought of having those annoying unwanted Apps is really making me hesitate in buying a computer today.  Those Smart TVs with APPS, no thanks too...I will settle for a stupid TV instead.
huberddp
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0%
huberddp,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/22/2014 | 12:04:32 PM
Classic Shell
I just use the classic shell which is free. I turn off all the windows 8.1 features and it works great.
huberddp
100%
0%
huberddp,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/22/2014 | 12:04:31 PM
Classic Shell
I just use the classic shell which is free. I turn off all the windows 8.1 features and it works great.
Nematoad
0%
100%
Nematoad,
User Rank: Guru
1/16/2014 | 8:16:59 PM
Re: More reasons to hate Windows 8
UEFI is something that you have to disable if you want to install Windows 7 or XP.
Nematoad
0%
100%
Nematoad,
User Rank: Guru
1/16/2014 | 8:15:52 PM
Windows 8.1 Metro Apps
I am dumbfounded by the lack of any kind of menu bar, and an exit button on my new metro apps. To terminate them, you have to first open the task manager, and the close them the way you would close a hung app.
jrich751
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100%
jrich751,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/13/2014 | 9:27:53 AM
Re: More reasons to hate Windows 8
I can't belive your hating on Windows because of UEFI.  You seriously need to update your game.  UEFI has nothing to do with Windows 8.1 or any operating system, for that mater.  And, yes, UEFI partitions and disks can be encrypted.

www.uefi.org
robzilla
50%
50%
robzilla,
User Rank: Strategist
1/10/2014 | 1:12:13 PM
Do not agree with most here.
On my traditional laptop with Windows 7 windows 8 was a disaster and for non touch devices the metro inteface takes some getting used to but Windows 8.1 is a major improvement. It is sort of like when most machines were running xp and had maybe a gig of ram and pentium 4 and tried to upgrade to Vista. Whenever there is a major change people complain and I was one of them until I got a windows tablet running 8.1. Now I can honestly say I understand what MS was doing. Right now the os is sort of a hybrid between desktop os and touch os. I think there are a few improvements to be made to make it fully functionalfor touch but that being said it is amazing what you can do on a tablet now. Having primarily used Android for tablets and apple and android for phones I really liked their interface and with Android the level of control. However I always wanted to run Ubuntu or some other full desktop os with a touch interface because sometimes you want to use more than one program at a time. I know there are exceptions to that with Samsung but it is still not the same functionality you have with windows 8.1. As I have learned how to use 8.1 and the metro interface there are some things I like about it better than traditional windows ui. For example to bring ip task manager or control panel or my computer I simply tap on the icon which I can pin to my start menu which makes common tasks I do very quick and easy. The versatility of having a desktop when I need it and metro is really great and with periferals I can use my tablet as a full blown desktop so I can get down to business or have fun all in one device. I truly see that the touch interface will replace desktops in the future and when voice recognition becomes error free then keybords and mice will not be an issue. Right now a lot of people are in that transition period and if you have old hardware it is hard to see the real beauty of the change. When you change your device you might change your mind too and as touch on windows matures it will only improve. So while I understand the complaints I do think MS did the right thing because if they had not made the changes they made and force everyone to change with them the traditional desktop would never ever die and you can't advance splitting your resources to cater to two distinct visions. Also others would say how MS is getting behind the competition and now they are leading again. Does Apple or Google offer a full OS on their tablets? Can I use an iPad or a Nexus 7 to be productive not just consumptive? Maybe that is their model but why can't I want more? Why do I need a tablet and a laptop and a smartphone. Why can't I just have a couple of devices? Simplifying is better in my opinion. I really think the future of computers will be tablets with docking stations to run like a regular pc and laptops and desktops will be made obsolete. They just need to make the ram upgradable and as long as you have a sd card expansion slot or maybe even two you are good. Larger on board storage as well. Also a user replacable battery. Once these features are incorperated into the tablets and docking stations become the norm to run monitors, etc then I really see nothing holding these tablets back. Maybe I am nuts but so far I really like windows 8.1. It boots insanely fast, faster than android and is pretty stable. I also disagree that the two ii interfaces are not well matched. They are different no doubt but that is lind of the point. Sometimes on a tablet I want to use the desktop ui and sometimes I like a ui more suited for touch but making me only be able use one style is called android or ios. If I wanted to be forced into only one ecosystem I would choose their design model which is limited. There may be a way to more gracefully combine the two ui but for now this is as good as it hets and my big suggestion for MS is allow pinch and zoom in desktop mode for the touch ui. I think the combination of both interfaces is what makes Windows 8.1 shine ans for some is also its weakness. However as usual with Microsoft we at least get to make the choice. You can set up your desktop to run much like windows 7 and enjoy the faster boot up time, lower resource use, and better security and you can also add touch to that experience as well. Also the metro interface lists different aspects of an applications features graphically. How else are they supposed to do it? I think I can read a description that tells me what is the app and what is the uninstaller. It is not comfusing to me. I do not see the 8 things to hate about windows 8 as being particularly important but almost amway to look for problems. You can complain about anything.
the5thHorseman
67%
33%
the5thHorseman,
User Rank: Strategist
1/9/2014 | 2:30:14 PM
Re: SORRY Microfoft but..........
Agreed. There is no compelling reason to even speak to Microsoft anymore. They are completely out of touch with virtually any customer using any of their products. I work at a university. We had Microsoft come in to make a pitch for one of their ID management solutions. These people could not get their presentation to run, could not get a WebEx connection to work, were unable to demo threir product. If that wasn't bad enough, they were unable to answer licensing questions because of the complexity of their licensing schemes. I felt embarrassed for them, I could not imagine working with such crap in such a confused (dis)organization. We are not moving to Windows 8, and are actively pursuing Linux based alternatives. Microsoft now has a CERTIFICATION for Windows licensing specialist... 8 courses... What an epic fail. I have wanted to abandon Microcrap for a long time, Thanks Steve for making such a compelling argurment for me... you did all the work! Nice job... 
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