Software // Operating Systems
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1/22/2014
09:06 AM
Michael Endler
Michael Endler
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HP Windows 7 Campaign Sidesteps Windows 8.1

HP's Windows 7 push makes marketing sense but reflects a lack of confidence in Windows 8.1 PCs.

The Windows 7 promotional banner on HP's online store
The Windows 7 promotional banner on HP's online store

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David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
6/10/2014 | 7:11:12 PM
Windows 7 at a premium
Looking at prices, it almost seems Win7 laptops are being sold at a premium, or at least no less money than Win8 ones. Worth paying more to miss out on the aggravation?
AsokS489
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AsokS489,
User Rank: Strategist
1/25/2014 | 1:01:48 AM
Re: Windows 7 rides again
"My Windows 8.1 laptop and desktop look like and work like XP or Windows 7, without any 3rd party add-on software to emulate the start feature"

No they don't. You just made that up.
concrete
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concrete,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 5:38:21 AM
Re: No surprise
People just hate the live tile interface. The learning curve is too great for many (personally ive side stepped it alltogether and have my most used apps pinned to the start bar). Win 7 is good theres no doubt but the performance increases in win 8 make it an obvious choice.
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
1/23/2014 | 1:19:55 AM
Re: Vista memories
I think this is a wise move on HP's part. 8.1 Tablets are great, but as others have said, it's not what they want on a PC. Microsoft may not completely realize it yet, but they have a rebellion on their hands, and this time there are alternatives available for Windows. If Microsoft wants to really push 8.1, one way would be to make the cheapest Surface they can, and then sell it at a loss. Then, as users scarf 'em up, they might well fall in love with 8.1, and move their PC buys to that OS. And again, I don't think it's fair to compare 8.1 to Vista, because 8.1 is strong and stable, and Vista never was.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
1/22/2014 | 4:50:24 PM
Re: Win 7 wasn't broke so why fix it?
"...that's just not what they want on laptops and desktops..."

According to an article on another site, "...most consumer systems come equipped with the newest version, Windows 8.1..."

While PC sales are down from previous years, there are still millions of them being sold.  If most come with Windows 8.1, are folks reformatting their devices and loading them with something else?
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
1/22/2014 | 4:44:47 PM
Re: Windows 7 rides again
Sort of-- but there's still no true Start menu in 8.1, just the list view you get by right clicking the Start button. Some Windows apps can add Start menu functionality, but the absense of a native version seems to be a sticking point with a light of people.


I agree, though, that once you've configured Windows 8.1 to your liking (boot-to-desktop, hot corners, etc), it can provide a better experience than Windows 7. But as I've written a few times lately, I think most of Windows 8.1's primary differentiators appeal mostly to niche groups. Those outside of these niches don't seem to find the increases in security and stability to be worth the customization and familiarization demands.
rradina
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rradina,
User Rank: Ninja
1/22/2014 | 4:34:27 PM
HP Facts...
A story on another site posted a few numbers about HP's newfound Windows 7 strategy.  Per that story, HP actually offers fewer models loaded with Windows 7 now than a year ago.  Further, the story claims that HP has consistently offered these models -- mostly to corporate customers who want Windows 7.

I don't recall the exact numbers but I want to say last year HP offered something like ~10 models loaded with Windows 7 and ~50 loaded with Windows 8.  They currently offer ~50+ (a few more) models loaded with Windows 8 and a few less than 10 loaded with Windows 7.

If this is a major campaign, it seems odd that they would offer fewer models than last year.  Perhaps their product team didn't get the marketing memo?  

Perhaps we owe it to ourselves to investigate some facts before forming opinions as to what HP is doing.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
1/22/2014 | 3:28:32 PM
Win 7 wasn't broke so why fix it?
The phrase "Back by popular demand" is such a kick in the pants to Windows 8. Windows 8 isn't as complicated as it appears to be and you can boot directly into desktop mode in Windows 8.1, which looks and feels just like Windows 7. But it doesn't matter. People see the New Windows commercials with the tiles and touchscreens and that's just not what they want on laptops and desktops. They want Windows 7.
RoleG356
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RoleG356,
User Rank: Strategist
1/22/2014 | 3:15:48 PM
Re: Windows 7 rides again
I believe you made a mistake.  My Windows 8.1 laptop and desktop look like and work like XP or Windows 7, without any 3rd party add-on software to emulate the start feature.  I almost never see the "Modern Tiles", and one keystroke swaps back to the desktop.  8.1 is faster, less error prone, and is not difficult to adapt to;  the learning curve you fear is just not there for everyday tasks.
sscheiber
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sscheiber,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/22/2014 | 2:01:53 PM
Windows 7 rides again
I can't say that I'm surprised by HP's move to offer Windows 7 PCs.  A few weeks ago, I made the same decision myself, scarfing up one of the few Windows 7 PCs that were available at that time.  Although I hadn't planned to replace my existing PC so soon, I seized the opportunity to get a new machine before the market forced me to migrate to Windows 8.x.  As the author of this piece suggests, I wanted my PC to look like a PC.  I'm not a Luddite.  But I haven't the time or patience to endure a learning curve to adopt a version of Windows that -- to me -- has little to recommend it.

 

I hope that HP continues to offer that option for its customers.  Windows 7 may in fact be 4 years old, but it is a stable platform and a familiar interface.
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