Software // Operating Systems
News
7/24/2013
10:56 PM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%
Repost This

Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond

Windows XP loyalists have a bone (or three) to pick with Microsoft.

10 Hidden Benefits of Windows 8.1
10 Hidden Benefits of Windows 8.1
(click image for larger view)
You could fool yourself into thinking that people who still use Windows XP are just laggards, a bunch of change-fearing folks stuck in the age of flip phones and Web 1.0. You could also buy into a theory that XP usage stats are inflated by PCs that will never be upgraded or replaced; those machines will simply grow old and die, and tablets and smartphones will rule the world.

Neither perspective would adequately explain why so many of the world's computers still run on XP. It's a dozen years old and nearing the end of its so-called life -- which just means that Microsoft will soon end support for the operating system. No more security patches, bug fixes, driver updates, you name it -- all of that goes away on April 8, 2014, which poses potential risks for businesses and individuals who plan to stick with XP beyond that date.

Yet less than nine months from XP's retirement party in Redmond, one in three PCs still run the OS, give or take. OS usage statistics tend to vary based on a variety of factors. Microsoft estimates around 30% of its small and midsize business (SMB) customers still use XP; recent market share data from Net Applications said XP accounts for 37% of PCs around the world. These aren't exactly "margin of error" numbers.

Recent emails and story comments from InformationWeek readers shed some light on the Catch-22 that XP has become for Microsoft. XP has a been a whopping, enduring success -- so much so that its most loyal users have little interest in buying newer versions of Windows nor, in many cases, newer hardware.

[ What's holding back Windows 8 tablets? Read Windows 8 Tablets' Big Flaw: Hardware Compromise. ]

Here's what those readers have to say. (Note: Minor changes have been made to some responses to ensure clarity without altering content.)

We Just Like XP Better -- So Why Change?

Reader "sholden334" wrote in a recent story comment: "When I got my new Windows 7 PC, I loaded Parallels and transferred my whole XP work environment to a virtual machine. I find Access 2000 and Borland's C++ very productive, Excel 2010 handles bigger spreadsheets and XP is rock solid. Why should I change?"

The Honda Civic Of Operating Systems

Likewise, Lee, an IT pro, wrote via email that he can't foresee any good reason to stop using his XP machine, especially when it's more reliable than his newer PC. "I still have an XP computer that is running fine. The original hard drive was dying and it was ghosted onto the current drive," Lee said. "It boots faster than my Windows 7 computer. Everything runs fine. Why should I get rid of it?"

In a piece a while back on my own Windows 8 hesitations, I felt oddly compelled to mention that I drive a 2002 Honda Civic. There might be something to the Civic mentality -- and some common ground with XP in terms of long-term reliability. By way of explaining his XP usage, Lee wrote: "I had a 1988 Honda Civic for 19 years and 140,000 miles because I turned the key and the engine started."

We'll Move When We Must (And Not A Moment Sooner)

"Moonwatcher" wrote in a story comment: "Businesses will move when they HAVE to. I'm still running XP on my main home machine. Why? Because I've spent hours and hours configuring programs to work as I want them. I'm not looking forward to repeating the process just to make Microsoft some money. I did have to buy a new PC recently to run a computer-aided design (CAD) program for work and unfortunately at the time, Dell would not allow me to get Windows 7, so I got stuck on (and hate) Windows 8. I only use that PC to run my CAD program. For all other things I use the old, reliable XP box."

We'd Love To Upgrade -- If Only It Weren't So Difficult

Some businesses would like to upgrade but find themselves stuck in a constant tug-of-war for resources. Roy Atkinson shared this hypothetical scenario in a story comment:

"If I am an application developer at a large, say, healthcare institution and 80% of the PCs there are running XP, when we institute electronic medical records (EMR) software, what OS am I developing and testing for? XP, of course. The project managers and hospital administration are likely pressuring me to complete the EMR rollout, so I cannot stop now and then begin developing and testing for Windows 7 or 8, as much as the desktop support folks would like me to. So, now we have a larger problem. I can't test for Win7 because I'm on a deadline, but I can't stay on XP because it's on a deadline. My speed is holding up deployment of new equipment and OS.

Many desktop support groups I talk to are losing sleep because they are stuck in this situation. They know exactly how vulnerable XP will be once the patching stops, and they'd love to get a new OS rolled out, but they can't."

Previous
1 of 2
Next
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
ThomasEarlVA
50%
50%
ThomasEarlVA,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/26/2014 | 6:16:25 AM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
Microsoft, Apple, Java, and a number of other software providers normally have an end of life date/cycle for their products because after a number of newer versions, they don't want to support an older architecture with a dwindling user base that divides their team efforts to work on current and newer code, and most of these vendors provide the date of expiration on their websites (not on the product packaging).  It's also a way to get new revenue, IF the end-user has a need to continue using the product in a productive manner in an environment that poses more risk than reward (a machine offline probably has no reason to switch software if it's running fine as is ~ sans vendor support).  Again, not just Microsoft, and it's both a cash grab but a real security concern, as hackers are 'banking' their exploits for release once the support ends, and there has been enough warning from each version that this isn't new.
kburrows
50%
50%
kburrows,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/13/2013 | 12:56:32 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
You can continue to use it forever if you want. They just aren't required to support it.
moonwatcher
50%
50%
moonwatcher,
User Rank: Strategist
8/31/2013 | 6:44:05 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
Thanks for the info. I guess I missed the boat on getting Win 8 for the cheapo upgrade price when it first came out then, to upgrade my old XP box. From what I'd read in an issue of PC World, I was led to believe the motherboard HAD to support UEFI in order to install Win 8.
steakloverguy
50%
50%
steakloverguy,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/30/2013 | 4:45:44 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
I FOUND AN IDEA. If you want windows xp till 2015 or even 2017, check out Windows Server 2003. It's the exact same thing and it's not ending support in 2014. Microsoft thinks they can get away with this but they can't. Grab a pirated copy or buy one or bid one. This is so frikin awesome. If you feel like there's no themes on Windows Server 2003, locate your themes on windows xp. Go to start, run, cmd, and then type without the quotes, "start \windows\themes" Copy all your themes to the new os, and there you go. And that should do. XP lasts till 2015. Please check out this page for more details
http://support.microsoft.com/l...

And look exactly at Extended Support End Date. Please spread the word. Thank you.

And if you get Windows Server 2003 Datacenter R2 X64 Edition with Service Pack 2, they haven't even decided when to end support.
Lord_Beavis
50%
50%
Lord_Beavis,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/29/2013 | 7:59:29 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
When you get an answer for that, see if you can find the answer for the question of do we really need GUI in data entry jobs?
Lord_Beavis
50%
50%
Lord_Beavis,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/29/2013 | 7:57:00 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
No, UEFI is an attempt to quell Linux adoption.
Lord_Beavis
50%
50%
Lord_Beavis,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/29/2013 | 7:55:12 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
Don't feed the trolls.
remmeler
50%
50%
remmeler,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2013 | 4:26:02 PM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
My upgrade from XP was reasonably smooth. Unlike from Vista, you have to re-install all your application programs.

As I have mentioned in a previous comment, I was almost scared off by all the negative comments but for, at the time, $40, I tried to out on a retired XP that I had (after running the free MS program that tested it to see if it and the programs and drivers would be compatible)

I played with it for about 20 minutes and changed some of the defaults and realized it was a slightly faster, slightly more responsive Windows 7 (on the Desktop) with a Bolted on Modern Front end (which used to be called Metro). Also it brought the retired XP back from the dead. I then upgraded my production XP

I am a long time Windows users with a lot of programs and without a Smart Phone so after checking out some of the available apps and playing with them, I found none to be of significant value to me. But they all seemed to work fine with my trackball. I had not even thought about the fact that they worked on touch.

I boot to and stay on Desktop and store my less used programs on Tiles on the front end so I can find them easily. I am never shot to the front end and I must press a keyboard key to get there.

I now run a Win 7 and Win 8 side by side both with dual monitors and although Win 8 might be slightly better, I saw no reason to upgrade the 7, even at $40

If you want to know something specific, just reply to this comment.
focu
50%
50%
focu,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/28/2013 | 6:33:04 AM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
what were your experiences of the upgrade to windows 8 ?
focu
50%
50%
focu,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/28/2013 | 6:30:26 AM
re: Windows XP's End Of Life: Readers Respond
has anyone tried to upgrade from windows xp to windows 8, using the electronic upgrade, did you succeed ?
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
InformationWeek Elite 100 - 2014
Our InformationWeek Elite 100 issue -- our 26th ranking of technology innovators -- shines a spotlight on businesses that are succeeding because of their digital strategies. We take a close at look at the top five companies in this year's ranking and the eight winners of our Business Innovation awards, and offer 20 great ideas that you can use in your company. We also provide a ranked list of our Elite 100 innovators.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Audio Interviews
Archived Audio Interviews
GE is a leader in combining connected devices and advanced analytics in pursuit of practical goals like less downtime, lower operating costs, and higher throughput. At GIO Power & Water, CIO Jim Fowler is part of the team exploring how to apply these techniques to some of the world's essential infrastructure, from power plants to water treatment systems. Join us, and bring your questions, as we talk about what's ahead.