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11/15/2013
08:00 AM
Kristin Burnham
Kristin Burnham
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10 Top LinkedIn Tips, Tricks

Follow these best-practices to improve your profile, get noticed by recruiters, and land your next gig.
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How LinkedIn savvy are you? Whether you're a seasoned user or a newbie just getting started, learning the ins and outs of the social network takes time. Here's a look at some of its best little-known features, plus tips for getting noticed by recruiters, managing your profile, and more.

1. Edit Or Remove Endorsements
LinkedIn introduced a new feature called Endorsements almost a year ago. Endorsements, which are found under the Skills & Expertise section of your profile, let your connections vote up the talents and proficiencies you've listed within your profile, as well as recommend new ones they think should be included. Your skills are then ranked and reranked based on the number of people who have voted on them.

As popular as Endorsements appear to be -- with more than 1 billion given to more than 58 million professionals, according to LinkedIn -- some LinkedIn users don't agree that they're useful. Because many people accept LinkedIn invitations to connect with people they don't know well, endorsements from these connections may be misguided, insincere, or incorrect. There's even a Tumblr blog called Endorsement Bombing that highlights how endorsements are abused on some profiles by users voting up skills such as "roundhouse kicks" and "comedic timing."

If you haven't paid attention to this profile section before, the good news is there are three ways you can edit it. To remove individual skills from your profile, navigate to the main menu and select Edit Profile under the Profile heading. Scroll to the Skills & Expertise section and click Edit. Here, delete individual skills from your profile by clicking the X next to each one.

Your second option is to remove endorsements from select connections. This may be useful if you want to limit your endorsements to only the connections you know well and trust. To do this, click the Manage Endorsements tab to switch views. Click a skill, and then uncheck the box next to the contact you want to remove. When you're finished modifying your endorsements, click Save.

Your third option is to remove the entire endorsements section from your profile. To do this, scroll to the Skills & Expertise section and click Edit. From the dropdown menu next to the option "Display your endorsements?" choose "No, do not display my endorsements." Click Save.

By default, LinkedIn users receive emails when they have received an endorsement. Users who receive many endorsements from connections may find these emails annoying. The good news is you can opt out. To do so, navigate to your Privacy & Settings page, click the Communications side tab on the left (next to the envelope icon), and click Set The Frequency Of Emails. Then click Notifications to expand the options below it and find the Endorsements section. Select "No Email" and click "Save Changes."

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Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
12/18/2013 | 8:59:32 PM
Re: Job hunting
It's interesting you say that. There was a report recently that looked into how much junk and solicitation email LinkedIn users were receiving. I wonder if that's a problem for other readers, too.
JonathanS862
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JonathanS862,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/21/2013 | 7:11:06 PM
Re: Excellent tips
I'm wondering the same thing.  I think I prefer having endorsements from people who actually know me and are genuinely emdorsing me because they believe I have the particular skill in question.  When people who don't know me endorse me for some skill that they obviously have no direct experience of (one way or the other), I generally don't accept their endorsement.  If it is for some skill like editing or marketing, that they can have formed an opinion from what I have presented publicly, then it is in a gray area for me.  

As for my endorsement of others -- I only do this for people I actually know and for skills where I have first hand knowledge of that person performance. I believe that one should be very judicious in endorsing people otherwise it devalues all endorsements.  I am very glad that LinkedIn provides the tools each individual to control their endorsements as they see fit.
SaneIT
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SaneIT,
User Rank: Ninja
11/19/2013 | 8:15:58 AM
Job hunting
I can't say that I've ever used LinkedIn to look for jobs.  I get notifications constantly about job openings it thinks I may be interested in but I'm not out looking for a job.  I doubt that I'm using LinkedIn to anything near it's potential but what I'm seeing is that it's less of a communication tool for me and more of a way for sales people to find me since about 90% of the messages I get are recruiters trying to place people or someone trying to sell me something.
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
11/18/2013 | 7:37:37 PM
Re: I can't stand the endorsements!
Agreed Kristin... That would seem to be commen sence but it seems that's not always followed. The problem is if these endorsements are looked at as meaningless then it won't matter if they are legit or not. But they can't hurt.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
11/18/2013 | 9:35:55 AM
Re: I can't stand the endorsements!
I think a good rule of thumb is to endorse only the people you know for skills you're confident they're proficient in. That would solve many of the problems; don't just click "Endorse" because it's there and it's easy.
virsingh211
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virsingh211,
User Rank: Strategist
11/18/2013 | 7:49:46 AM
Re: Excellent tips
Other endorsement, i have seen freshers getting boosted due these recommendation, i still remember one of the graduate trainee under me, i wrote a recommendation for him on linkedin and he was boosted as if some he acheived some award.
philhclark
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philhclark,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/18/2013 | 6:32:38 AM
Re: I can't stand the endorsements!
endorsements does feel to me like a naked way adding engagement to the platform, but more often it's false. Either there are made-up skills or people endorse you not for genuine reasons but as pure flattery. so good to see some controls here.

I see you can now add genuine skills, ie. courses or certfifications completed via this addition to the LinkedIn profile -
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2013 | 7:43:20 PM
Re: Excellent tips
These are excellent tips. What I think can go a long way for you are the recommendations from coworkers. A well written one can speak volumes on how you work.
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
11/17/2013 | 7:38:42 PM
Re: I can't stand the endorsements!
@kelly... If your endorsements aren't coming from coworkers then I can see why it would annoy you. So far mine have and I'm going to keep them.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
11/17/2013 | 4:12:46 PM
Re: Excellent tips
I sometimes get endorsements for skills that I used three jobs ago but are not relevant to what I do now. In that case, it's nice to have the option of removing them from the page.
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