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6/28/2014
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Facebook News Feed: 5 Changes

Gone are the days when Facebook showed you every post from every friend. Here's a look at Facebook's latest News Feed algorithm changes and how they affect the content you see.

whether you see more or less of them in your News Feed.

In addition to other factors that determined whether or not you'd see a video in your News Feed, Facebook will consider whether people watched it and for how long to determine whether or not it appears in your feed, the social network said.

If you tend to watch videos in your News Feed, you can expect to see more videos near the top, Facebook said. Conversely, if you skip over videos without watching them, Facebook will show you fewer videos.

"This improvement means that videos that people choose to watch will reach a larger audience, while videos that people ignore will be shown to fewer people," Facebook said.

4. You may see fewer posts from Pages
Because competition for space in your News Feed has become so fierce, the social network has tweaked its algorithm to show you only the most-relevant posts from Pages you follow. As a result, businesses have complained about a sharp decline in the number of people they reach.

In a blog post this month, Facebook product marketing lead Brian Bloan explained the reasons behind the changes and how marketers should adjust their approach to Facebook to succeed.

"Of the 1,500+ stories a person might see whenever they log onto Facebook, News Feed displays approximately 300. To choose which stories to show, News Feed ranks each possible story from more to less important by looking at thousands of factors relative to each person," he said.

While the posts you see from Pages you have Liked may drop, businesses will be working harder than ever to create valuable content that's both timely and interesting, among other factors.

5. Expect fewer auto-shared posts from apps

If you don't care about which photos your Friends liked on Instagram, the songs they listened to on Spotify, or the DIY projects they pinned on Pinterest, you're in luck: Facebook has toned down automatically shared posts from applications.

"Over the past year, the number of implicitly shared stories in News Feed has naturally declined. This decline is correlated with how often people mark app posts as spam, which dropped by 75% over the same period," Facebook's Peter Yang wrote in a blog post.

Instead, Facebook says, it has prioritized posts that you deliberately share, such as articles from news sites, photos from Instagram, and songs from Spotify.

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Kristin Burnham currently serves as InformationWeek.com's Senior Editor, covering social media, social business, IT leadership and IT careers. Prior to joining InformationWeek in July 2013, she served in a number of roles at CIO magazine and CIO.com, most recently as senior ... View Full Bio

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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
7/5/2014 | 7:30:11 AM
Re: What about "You won't believe what happened next" kind of post?
Thanks for the link, Kristin. 

It's good to know that sometimes it's good to follow your guts and don't click on what you find annoying on Facebook. :)

-Susan
Justin Belmont
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Justin Belmont,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/1/2014 | 6:09:51 PM
Facebook changes
Very informative article, Kristin - thanks for sharing. It sounds like these News Feed updates are going to be really great for reducing clutter in users' newsfeeds, but you can understand how businesses would be concerned about people missing out on their posts. That's why it's important to really aim for quality content that provides valuable information, rather than just trying to make a sell, which is what we help out clients do at www.ProseMedia.com
jgherbert
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jgherbert,
User Rank: Ninja
7/1/2014 | 12:27:39 PM
Re: What about "You won't believe what happened next" kind of post?
"Often those types of posts are actually phishing attempts that propogate when others click on them, so it's smart that you avoid them."

The thing is, it isn't just the scammers doing this now. Most of the 'viral content' sites are using this kind of headline because it's like clickbait to a social media fish. The content (so long as not salacious) is usually genuine in my experience, but the headline often outsells the reality. I've actually been joking with my wife that in order to increase hits on my blog, I need to start creating posts titled things like:

 

"Cisco said they were going to acquire Tail-f. You won't believe what happened next!"

"This Juniper EX switch will change your life forever. I'm in tears reading about it."

"This Brocade introduction video made me geek out so hard I'm still shaking. You have to see this."

"Amazing: 17 reasons why TRILL is better than SPB... Number 14 will blow your mind!"

"See what Pluribus had to say when Facebook waved a Wedge switch in their face. You won't believe their reaction!"

 

It's TIRESOME, y'all.

etc... 
H@mmy
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H@mmy,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2014 | 3:39:35 PM
Re: Facebook pages
Yes, I do manage Facebook pages. From past couple of years Facebook alogorithm changes brings adverse effects on posts reach. Pages with large number of likes even have their post reach dropped to less than 10%. You are bound to spend now, to keep your page live.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
6/30/2014 | 2:44:01 PM
Re: What about "You won't believe what happened next" kind of post?
Often those types of posts are actually phishing attempts that propogate when others click on them, so it's smart that you avoid them. (Here's a story I wrote last year for more on how to identify Facebook scams.)
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
6/30/2014 | 2:39:20 PM
Re: Facebook pages
Do you manage a Page for a business? I'd be interested to hear how these changes are affecting your strategy on Facebook. Do you plan to spend more or less on advertising?
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
6/30/2014 | 2:38:06 PM
Re: algorithm needed or just a general clean up
@jgherbert, I tend to agree with you. Facebook gives you options like Lists and other ways to sort your News Feed for the exact purpose. Presumably, you know better than any algorithm which content you like and don't like.

I will say, however, that I've noticed some of these changes and I think they've benefitted me: I can't stand people who post and repost memes, and I never cared much about which of my friends liked photos on Instagram, particularly if they weren't from someone I know. These posts are few and far between now, which has helped declutter my feed.
PaulS681
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PaulS681,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2014 | 6:43:50 PM
spam
I still see waht I consider spam in my newsfeed. Yes it had changed a bit... but spam is spam.
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2014 | 7:57:25 AM
What about "You won't believe what happened next" kind of post?
Kristin, 

It's good to see Facebook has started to improve its News Feed algorithms and, for instance, eliminating the auto-posts from apps and over sharing of the same annoying post over and over.

However, part of what Facebook is becoming has to do with what users choose to post, like, share, etc. It would be nice if people start being more mindful at the time of posting stuff.

Also, the media sometimes is to blame, too. Headlines like "You won't believe what happened next" and others if its kind have started to appear on a daily basis.

I would like to see some starts on how many people fall into those traps. Personally, I always ignore them. I would like to have a button on Facebook which could let me block those posts. :/ 

-Susan
H@mmy
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H@mmy,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2014 | 7:38:02 AM
Facebook pages
The new Facebook algorithm has affected the page admins a lot. Now you need to spend on Facebook ads to boost your post else users will not be notified about the new posts on the page. So a new technique by Facebook to earn more from ads.
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