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8/29/2014
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Facebook News Feeds To Get Event Ads

Facebook's newest ad unit lets businesses promote events within users' news feeds. Here's what to expect.

Facebook Privacy: 10 Settings To Check
Facebook Privacy: 10 Settings To Check
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Facebook announced a new type of ad this week to help businesses more effectively promote events. Event ads were traditionally displayed in the right-hand column of Facebook's desktop version, but the new ad unit will promote events within users' news feeds, the company said.

Facebook's events feature is used by more than 400 million people across the world, according to the social network. Nearly 30% of these events are created by Pages. This new ad unit, plus event insights, will give businesses more details about how effectively they're reaching their audience, Facebook said.

Event ads both on desktop and mobile will display a Sponsored tag below the event name to distinguish it from unpaid events. Like other events, the ad will also show the event details, and include buttons to like the Page and event, comment on it, and share it.

[Popular social apps may track your every move. Read Location Tracking: 6 Social App Settings To Check.]

Page owners have two ways to create event ads: either by using the Ad Create tool, or the Power Editor. You can expect to see these new ads in the coming weeks, Facebook said.

Facebook will also launch an event insights dashboard, which Page admins can view in the right-hand column of an event page. You'll see stats on the number of people who have seen a link to the event on Facebook, the number of people who have viewed it, and the number of joins, saves, and maybes that the event has received.

In addition to the changes for Pages and advertisers, events got a facelift on the user end, too. Aside from a cleaner look that displays the events you were invited to, saved, and are hosting, you'll see suggested events based on information such as the Pages you like, your location, and the day of the week.

Facebook hints that these changes to events are the first of more to come, but did not disclose what users might see in the future.

Moving event ads from the right-hand column to users' news feeds frees up more-expensive ad real estate. In June, Facebook announced a redesigned ad format on the right-hand side that advertisers could expect to pay more for, since Facebook planned to serve fewer ads in this location.

"The redesign of right-hand column ads is part of an ongoing initiative to improve our ads in general," Facebook said at the time. "These results suggest that we're on the right path: People are finding the new right-hand column ads more engaging and advertisers, therefore, are getting more value for their ad impressions."

Facebook recently made improvements to ads on the user end, too. Earlier this year, Facebook launched a new feature that details why you see certain ads and lets you adjust topics of interest.

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Kristin Burnham currently serves as InformationWeek.com's Senior Editor, covering social media, social business, IT leadership and IT careers. Prior to joining InformationWeek in July 2013, she served in a number of roles at CIO magazine and CIO.com, most recently as senior ... View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
9/11/2014 | 8:37:53 AM
Re: Sounds promising
And solicitations on LinkedIn itself aren't even the only problem.  I got SO mad when I found out that this guy who ran a bunch of groups I belonged to was essentially using LinkedIn groups to collect email addresses for spam purposes.

And yet he's not the only one (although he was an especially egregious example).  This, unfortunately, makes Groups perhaps the worst feature about LinkedIn.

Well, other than some of those stupid clickbaity Pulse articles.

...no...no...Groups are still worse.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
9/10/2014 | 2:39:51 PM
Re: Sounds promising
LinkedIn's messages need an overhaul. I, too, get a ton of unwanted solicitations.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
9/1/2014 | 10:59:26 AM
Re: Event advertising
It really depends on how well they did it. If Facebook recommends something you indeed need, why not take a look? In this case the event ads is not pure commercial action from Facebook but something for your own benefit.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 1:07:12 PM
Re: Event advertising
@stotheco: You flatter me!  :)

Their monetization really hasn't changed too too much since the company went public; rather, going public shed more light on their monetization and their revenues, which perhaps goes a long way toward accounting for the avalanche-like slide the stock price saw on opening day.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 1:05:40 PM
Re: Sounds promising
@stotheco: I think it is the answer.  And remember: Facebook isn't charging to send messages; it's charging to send a notification to the recipient about the message if they are not a Facebook friend.

And really, when you think about it, it's very rare that you need to message someone on Facebook who is not a Facebook friend (absent a message accompanying a Friend Request) where you haven't had an introduction from a mutual Facebook friend at first.

So expected messages and messages from friends still get seen.  It's the unsolicited messages from people you have nothing to do with that -- while still sent and received -- are not heralded with a prominent notification.

Sounds good to me.
stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 10:47:49 AM
Re: Event advertising
Joe, sounds like Facebook should take you on as a consultant. Your suggestions are practical but it's crazy how they are not implementing this as we speak. We very well know they are capable. What's stopping them from doing so? Ever since going public, their monetizing efforts have been quite weak, so to speak.
stotheco
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stotheco,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 10:36:17 AM
Re: Sounds promising
I have similar beef with charging for messages. If it is indeed an effort to reduce spam, is charging to send messages really the solution to that? 
shamika
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shamika,
User Rank: Ninja
8/31/2014 | 6:24:23 AM
Re: Sounds promising
Sounds interesting.  This has become a good tool for marketing. In my personnel experience seems it is a good initiative. 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2014 | 9:57:23 PM
Re: Sounds promising
@Henrisha: I tend to doubt that that move was about "monetizing messages;" rather, I think, it was to solve a legitimate problem: Facebook spam.

I'd really like to see a similar deployment on LinkedIn -- where I have, in the past, gotten tons of spam messages (that is, until I majorly cut down on which LI groups I belonged to).
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/30/2014 | 9:55:10 PM
Re: Event advertising
@Henrisha: I'm not convinced that FB is going about monetizing event ads in the proper way, though.

For instance, to be specific, the event I was specifically interested in that FB advertised to me was an upcoming gig by comedienne Amy Schumer.

Why not sell tickets for some of these events online through the event process?  Then, not only is the client getting a better idea of how well the event ads are working, but Facebook is getting a direct commission/cut.

But then, Facebook perhaps prefers that they get a significant payday that isn't tied to performance, given their purported track record/public controversies about their practices...
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
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