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7/2/2014
03:05 PM
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Monster Tool Aggregates Your Social Posts For Job Recruiters

What do your public social network posts say about you? TalentBin by Monster aggregates them into a database for hiring managers -- whether you're looking for a job or not.

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ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/7/2014 | 3:29:05 PM
Re: Other side?
It seems like a reasonably small universe of jobs for which your broad social posting is an important factor. If I'm hiring a developer, I'm probably more interested in their activity on one open source project community than on Twitter.  
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
7/7/2014 | 1:49:55 PM
Other side?
To take an opposite stance, would a tool like this --used by recruiters looking for candidates -- encourage you to ramp up your posts related to your industry rather than lock them down? Why or why not?
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
7/5/2014 | 4:54:15 PM
Re: Public social posts
TalentBin costs money to get its full potential. Why wouldn't I just use LinkedIn. LinkedIn is perfectly fine to use for its free tiers, although I am aware of its premier product. However, I have use the premier version, and I wasn't all that impressed with it.

Monster competes directly with LinkedIn. And I get this feeling that TalentBin is all about Monster trying to catch up with social networking for professionals. I don't think it is going to work. 
Gary_EL
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/4/2014 | 9:06:46 PM
Re: Public social posts
Just have two profiles, one for fun, and another for business. And, link them to two separate Email addresses.
gev
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gev,
User Rank: Moderator
7/3/2014 | 1:55:28 PM
Re: How does Monster's crawler identify users?
This is a terrible thing to say. First, there is no guarantee that I will not get aggregated with someone else if I stay opted in, and that can affect my career. Second, opting out is as lame as it can be. It only gurds Monster from lawsuits. It does not help users at all. We assume that all Monster users are aware of the fact that the data is being aggregated on them? So there are gazillion of the unaware Monster users, and additionally a big chunk of users who tailor their on-line postings for possible employers to see. Such as I can post programming articles to programming sites and log with my Linked In credencials for everyone to see. There are also people without social media accounts (imagine that!), who will figure they need not bother to opt out as there is nothing to aggregate on them. Third, what is the point of providing a service that is financially dangerous to use and then giving an opt out option? Fourth, my original question about the method of identification has not been answered.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/3/2014 | 12:13:09 PM
Re: How does Monster's crawler identify users?
Important to note that the article states you can opt out of being aggregated at all by this service.
gev
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gev,
User Rank: Moderator
7/3/2014 | 11:44:28 AM
How does Monster's crawler identify users?
Suppose your name is Joe Shmo, and you live in NYC. There are twenty five more people with the same name living in NYC. Some of them post inappropriate comments, such as hate messages. Will your Monster crawler pile them up into your profile, for all the employers to see? If you think it will not, think again. Now all of a sudden, you are not getting any good job offers, and you will never find out why because recruiters will not tell you, they will just call the next guy - or girl.
Ariella
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Ariella,
User Rank: Ninja
7/3/2014 | 10:24:23 AM
Re: Public social posts
@Shane and don't forget the ubiquitous cat videos! We're not a cat family, though, so I don't share those, though I have shared a Grumpy cat once or twice.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
7/3/2014 | 10:21:56 AM
Re: Public social posts
That's a good rule of thumb. I've learned to self-censor what I post, which really doesn't take that much effort. Most of the things people at a mature age post are rated PG-13 anyway. Kids, dogs, sunsets, concerts etc.
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Author
7/3/2014 | 10:14:28 AM
Re: So the lesson is...
It's up to people to lock down their Facebook profiles to keep out the snoopers, but surprisingly many people still keep their Facebook profiles open to the public as if it's some free-spirited self-expression platform. I think there's been a migration to Instagram as a place to express yourself more honestly. But I'm sure recruiters are tapping into Instagram too. The key thing is to set everything to private. If you aren't doing that, go do it. Right now.
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