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7/31/2008
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NowPublic Lists Silicon Valley's Most Influential Web Voices

The "crowd-sourced" list contains the most popular voices on the Web through sites like Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube, and others.

NowPublic has published a list of the most influential people in Silicon Valley.

The Web site, featuring news from "crowd-sourced" reporters, released the index Wednesday. It claims the list contains the most popular voices on the Web through sites like Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, YouTube, and others.

"We believe that new media tools redefine who the online newsmakers and reporters are," Leonard Brody, CEO and co-founder of NowPublic, said in an announcement. "This is part of the foundation upon which NowPublic is built. Traditional influence lists are increasingly irrelevant because they're predicated on outdated factors and metrics."

Brody said NowPublic emulated "old media PR conceit lists," and hopes to gain more traffic, but also wants to disclose metrics on whose personal brands are most popular and effective. His statement comes after criticism of a similar list released last week on New York's most influential players.

NowPublic said it rated people based on online visibility; presence on user-generated content and social networking sites; interactivity and accessibility; and an "R" factor, which represents presence on microblogging platforms like Flickr, Twitter, and Tumblr. It used statistics from Alexa, Compete, Facebook, Flickr, Google, Quantcast, Technorati, YouTube, and other sources, then analyzed and documented presence and popularity with a weighted scoring system.

The top players in Silicon Valley include: Robert Scoble; Michael Arrington; Jack Dorsey; Biz Stone; Matt Cutts; Pete Cashmore; Dave Winer; Guy Kawasaki; Loic Le Meur; and Kevin Rose.

The complete list, along with links to profiles, is available on NowPublic, which plans to release indexes periodically to highlight influential players in several areas.

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