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8 Cheat Sheet Sites To Ace Tech Job Interviews

Technical interviews can be grueling and filled with potential pitfalls. But you can up your chances of nailing them and landing that dream IT job with the right preparation. Here are 8 sites that offer sneak peeks at technical job interview questions at companies including Microsoft, Facebook, and Amazon.
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(Image: vm/iStockphoto)

(Image: vm/iStockphoto)

First the elation, then the fear. For some tech job seekers, that pretty much sums up the feelings of landing a technical interview.

But before fear-induced paralysis of the mind sets in, it may be worth your while to take a look at one of the websites that provide examples of job interview questions asked by a number of companies, one of which may be where you are interviewing.

However, you may wonder whether it's worth the time to review such cheat sheet questions.

"You should do anything you can that's legal to prepare for an interview. That includes looking at these sites, talking to people you know who work at the company or used to work there and talking to recruiters who help the company find people," said Jon Holman, founder of the executive recruiting firm The Holman Group.

He cautioned, however, that job seekers should never divulge they've taken the time to look at these sites to get a jump on the potential questions that they may come across in the job interview. Holman stressed, "You especially don't want to assume that the statements on the blog are true or current. Companies aren't stupid. If they know that a blogger has posted their "standard" questions ... (the) questions will get changed. And if you're flummoxed in the interview because you didn't think more broadly than the list of questions on the blog, well, you don't deserve the job."

Cody Voellinger, founder of tech recruiting firm RockIT Recruiting, holds a similar view.

While Voellinger says he believes it is "definitely" worth a person's effort to review these sites and the technical questions listed, he noted it is far more important to consider the type of questions asked and develop a broader frame of mind that will help in preparing answers to the questions.

For example, there are 20 different areas that the interview can focus on, Voellinger noted. And in looking at the cheat sheet questions, job candidates may notice a particular company likes to use pair programming tests, while another company may prefer white board tests.

[See 10 Best Tech Companies To Work For In 2016.]

Gayle Laakmann McDowell, founder and CEO of IT career and job training site CareerCup and author of Cracking the Coding Interview, said, "The goal of these questions is not to test if you know how to solve some problem, but rather to assess if you can 'figure out' how to solve a new problem."

She added that tech companies typically are supportive of job candidates who engage in interview preparation. "They want to hire more software developers, and know that the process isn't perfect. Good developers often get rejected because they just weren't prepared," Laakmann McDowell said. "Many recruiters actually give candidates links to CareerCup, Cracking the Coding Interview, and other resources. Some [tech recruiting companies] go so far as to fund preparation ... they know that this can be the critical step in landing a great candidate."

In addition to CareerCup, other tech interview preparation programs include Interview Kickstart. Of course, there are the following eight cheat sheet sites with examples of technical questions asked by such companies as Amazon, Microsoft, Google, and Facebook. Take a look and tell us whether you would use these sites to help with interview preparation or if you would recommend them to job seekers.

Dawn Kawamoto is a freelance writer and editor. She is an award-winning journalist who has written and edited technology, management, leadership, career, finance, and innovation stories for such publications as CNET's News.com, TheStreet.com, AOL's DailyFinance, and The ... View Full Bio

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Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2016 | 5:09:27 AM
Re: Glassdoor
"Food is an extremetly personal thing - some people are really picky about it, some have serious allergies, etc.  There just seem to be no boundaries anymore.  Plus, there are other ways to assess your reaction to adversity that have more to do with work skills than this, I think."

Vnewman2, you are right. There are different ways to judge or to measure everyone's tolerance. No need to be play around with foods; can create many other situations to judge the behavior and tolerance. 
Gigi3
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0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
2/26/2016 | 5:00:21 AM
Re: Glassdoor
" I understand the motivation he has to do it, but if it were me, all it would prove to me is that you can't be trusted as my employer if you're going to mess around with something I'm going to put in my body and I barely even know you. Food is way too personal of a thing. I would be out of there in a heartbeat and stick him with the check."

Vnewman2, you are right, playing with food is not acceptable. Everyone have their own views and sentiments with respect to food.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 4:54:04 PM
Re: Glassdoor
As an aside, I think this bothers me so much because we have enough personal intrusion into our lives from our workplace that I feel like things like being judged over something so personal isn't any of his business.  Food is an extremetly personal thing - some people are really picky about it, some have serious allergies, etc.  There just seem to be no boundaries anymore.  Plus, there are other ways to assess your reaction to adversity that have more to do with work skills than this, I think.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 2:00:59 AM
Re: Glassdoor
@Gigi. - I understand the motivation he has to do it, but if it were me, all it would prove to me is that you can't be trusted as my employer if you're going to mess around with something I'm going to put in my body and I barely even know you. Food is way too personal of a thing. I would be out of there in a heartbeat and stick him with the check.
Gigi3
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Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
2/23/2016 | 1:43:04 AM
Re: Glassdoor
"I just read an article where the CEO of Charles Schwab interviews candidates over breakfast and intentionally has the staff mess up the person's order to see how they will react to adversity.  Really?  If that were me, I'd serve him a knuckle sandwich for lunch.  I get what he's trying to assess, but you don't mess with people's food especially in a situations where are you are clearly the inferior person at the table."

Vnewman2, there are different parameters to check or evaluate with a job aspirants based on the opening they applied for. These parameters are different for technical, sales, service and management jobs. Someone get measures in terms of punctuality, or cooperation or communication or even with domain/technical skills. In certain cases, they used to measure these parameters via various instances or incidents. 
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
2/22/2016 | 2:16:55 PM
Re: Glassdoor
I just read an article where the CEO of Charles Schwab interviews candidates over breakfast and intentionally has the staff mess up the person's order to see how they will react to adversity.  Really?  If that were me, I'd serve him a knuckle sandwich for lunch.  I get what he's trying to assess, but you don't mess with people's food especially in a situations where are you are clearly the inferior person at the table.
Gigi3
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0%
Gigi3,
User Rank: Ninja
2/1/2016 | 1:35:48 AM
Re: Glassdoor
"Just because a person is looking for a job, that doesn't give the interviewer the right to yell to the candidate.  I think some people really aren't made as interviewer, sure they can code and program java like it was their first spoke language, but they don't have  people skills and shouldn't be in the interviewer seat."

Pedro, there are different ways to measure or to know ones knowledge and skills. No need of yelling or irritating or annoying for that; sometimes it may need to measure the patience or to know how you are responding to such instances. Above all humanitarian concerns and passion are important in any interviews from both ends.
vnewman2
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vnewman2,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2016 | 5:12:07 PM
Re: Glassdoor
@Joe - well of course you want someone "Likeable" but hiring someone because "they are a lot like you" isn't really a great way to fill a position.  What happens diversity then?
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2016 | 8:46:29 AM
Re: Glassdoor
@vnewman: To play devil's advocate, one could do a lot worse than hiring people on the basis of liking them.  Indeed, if a panel of interviewers genuinely like the candidate, that candidate will be more apt to fit into the company's culture.
Angelfuego
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Angelfuego,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2016 | 8:39:38 PM
Re: Glassdoor
@Joe S., Yes, I agree. It is a matter of being less robotic in your responses, so it seems more natural and less rehearsed.
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