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8/7/2014
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Glassdoor Adds Benefits Info

How do your company's benefits stack up? Glassdoor's newest feature lets job seekers compare time off, health insurance, office perks, and more.

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While salary is important, there's a lot more to consider before you accept a job offer. Does the company provide health and dental insurance? A 401(k) plan? What's its vacation policy?

Jobs and career site Glassdoor launched a new feature this week called Benefits Reviews, which gives job seekers insight into companies' perks based on crowdsourced information from current and former employees. Glassdoor says it hopes this information will help people find the best company fit based on their needs.

"Job seekers are already evaluating and comparing job offers, but with little information on what a benefits package really entails or whether it meets the need of employees," said Allyson Willoughby, SVP of people at Glassdoor. "Benefits and perks carry both personal and monetary value and impact an employee's satisfaction with their company. By unlocking information about benefits from those in the know, we believe it'll also lead to improved recruitment and employee retention rates."

[How does your job stack up? Read IT Salaries: 8 Cold Hard Facts.]

You can submit benefit information about your employer anonymously through an online survey. The questionnaire asks for the best and worst thing about your company's benefit package, then lists more than 50 benefits. You can mark each one as Yes, No, or Not sure.

Glassdoor's survey covers health and wellness benefits such as dental and vision insurance, financial and retirement perks like 401(k) and pension plans, family and parenting benefits such as maternity and paternity leave, vacation and sabbaticals, professional support such as tuition assistance and training, perks and discounts such as free lunches or a company car, and whether your office is dog friendly.

While former and current employees can rate a company's benefits, Glassdoor encourages employers to do the same through its Glassdoor Employer Profile. Here, employers can share details about what their benefits package includes and verify which ones their company does and doesn't offer.

The new feature has been in private beta for the last few weeks, so it's not yet easy to fully compare one company's benefits to another's. During the beta test, Glassdoor said it collected more than 4,000 anonymous benefit reviews from employees at a variety of companies.

For example, a product engineer at Facebook commented about the company's on-campus amenities, such as the in-house gym, music room, wood shop, bicycles, and even a climbing wall. At Google, employees lauded the free food and compensation packages, but said that work-life balance is difficult to maintain.

In addition to the newly launched benefits section, Glassdoor also collects information on companies' salaries, which you can browse by title and city; the interview process, including whether the interview experience was positive and its difficulty; plus jobs the company is hiring for.

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Kristin Burnham currently serves as InformationWeek.com's Senior Editor, covering social media, social business, IT leadership and IT careers. Prior to joining InformationWeek in July 2013, she served in a number of roles at CIO magazine and CIO.com, most recently as senior ... View Full Bio

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Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
8/10/2014 | 8:12:17 PM
Re: the more information the better
@Pedro -- Glassdoor encourages companies to add their own benefit info and ascertain what others have written. This will likely help weed out any inaccurate information.
MDMConsult14
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MDMConsult14,
User Rank: Moderator
8/9/2014 | 8:30:09 PM
Re: the more information the better
Yes. These are important areas of the company to know. If an IT worker were to change positions or look for a new job having as much information available will assist a great deal in the job search process.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
8/7/2014 | 7:35:03 PM
the more information the better
I think this is very useful information. the more information a person has about their future job, the better the decision they can make.  Each person has different set of values in regards to benefits based on their unique needs.   I'm concern on the reliability of the answers. How do I know an employee is just making up information about their employer regarding their benefits. 
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
8/7/2014 | 5:06:18 PM
Re: Glassdoor Adds Benefits Info
I've had Glassdoor recommended to me before purely based on the quality of the jobs listed, but what I didn't know about was all the extra info and details they offer beyond the bare-bones. You mention at the bottom all the other great info they give in addition to the new benefits overview, and that's great - the new system could give that extra layer to compliment what's already there. The fact that everything is sourced from employees as well as employers ties everything together nicely; an employer can brag about their great benefits package, but input from employees can tell you that the interview process is not worth the hassle. In other words, I can see why people recommend the site so highly.

Benefits (especially to this level of specificity) definitely do not get enough coverage and commentary in the current landscape. There's a small checklist that usually covers dental, medical (and maybe that on-site gym), and very little else. That's not asking all that much from a company that gets to know your social security number and entire work history before you even walk in the door! There's room for so many little things that you ought to know before making such a big life decision. In the age where I can decide exactly how many slices of my pizza have bannana peppers with an web app, it's not unreasonable to think I should get a little more  detail on of jobs I'm applying for!
 
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