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4/30/2014
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Google Car: What's Next?

Google's self-driving car is still very much an R&D project. But will it eventually find its way onto the freeway?

Parsing out what exactly Google is accomplishing with its self-driving car project isn't easy. The world awaits as dribs and drabs of information trickle occasionally from Google’s blog tease.

The latest leak, earlier this week, was a blog post by Chris Urmson, director of the Google Car project at Google. It offered a glimpse of how far Google's self-driving car has come, as it takes driving lessons on the streets of Mountain View, Calif.

The video clip posted on Urmson'’s blog also gives a sense of what the self-driving car’s machine vision is actually seeing as it tools along.

But what exactly have we learned? More important, what challenges are still ahead for Google (and the automotive industry as a whole) to move the self-driving car from an R&D project to a real product? We talked to a few industry analysts.


What computer vision sees

One thing that Urmason's post makes very clear is Google's ambition. It hopes to take its autonomous cars through every street and every city, in every terrain. Clearly, Google is eager to debunk the conventional assumption: Autonomous cars, most likely, will be deployed for driving on freeways.

Read the rest of this article on EE Times.

Former beat reporter, bureau chief, and editor in chief of EE Times, Junko Yoshida now spends a lot of her time covering the global electronics industry with a particular focus on China. Her beat has always been emerging technologies and business models that enable a new ... View Full Bio

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ChoJojigat
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ChoJojigat,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/2/2014 | 11:54:43 AM
Google Car
They say that the Google Car will be better in some ways, and I think they may well be right. Humans lack the ability to concentrate for any real length of time, and repetitive tasks ease us into mindlessness. Computers can hold speed and distance with far more accuracy than a human, never gets bored or angry or drunk and can recognize patterns. The patterns are actually there in the highway code.

My one question is this – Would the passengers be liable for any accidents? Would Google be liable? It seems like a mess. I have a good driving record and enjoy pretty cheap insurance rates ($26/month from Insurance Panda.. woohoo!). I also enjoy taking my car out for a spin and enjoying the 'freedom' of being able to drive anywhere. Will the driverless car allow all this? If not, I'll have to pass.

Who knows? Maybe insurance as we know it will go away, replaced by any number of models that would more accurately represent the new risk distribution.
stevekromer
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stevekromer,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/2/2014 | 3:28:33 AM
Google Invention
Now a day you can find different types of car and some special designed car on google. Because it is the special storage of every types of products and material. As per my ideas you can find any kind of data in Google in details but all the data needs to be follwoed properly. Like that google car that is the updated one but the thing is it will describing the newxt generation of every model too. But while buying a car you need to have information regarding the repairing center also otherwise you may face problem if immediately your car needs maintenance.

Volkswagen Repair Atlanta
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
5/4/2014 | 9:27:22 PM
Re: End game
Google Car sounds like a great idea but I have the same concern here. It's not comparable to Google Glass, which is still an IT product. For a car, you need the mechanical and energy part. Tesla did a great job in producing very energy efficient and powerful electricity driven cars. But can Google accomplish the similar thing? There are many engineering aspects to consider here.
MarcMeyer
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MarcMeyer,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/30/2014 | 3:40:27 PM
End game
Once we get past search with Google, every venture seems to be a really expensive dalliance. Clearly this is not part of Google's products or platform, so what is the end game?
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