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5/22/2014
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Is It Time To Ask For A Raise?

IT executives who are female or over 55 years old may be underpaid compared to their peers, according to InformationWeek's 2014 US IT Salary Survey.

Are you due for a raise? If you're a female IT executive, or more than 55 years old, your answer might well be a resounding "Yes!" Let's take a look at highlights of the InformationWeek 2014 US IT Salary Survey, released May 19, to see how your compensation stacks up.

This far-reaching survey polled more than 11,000 respondents in all walks of IT life -- from admins and developers to C-level executives. The survey results are broken up into a series of reports on InformationWeek.com. There's a wealth of valuable information here for those looking to hire as well as for those who are looking to advance their own careers.

For today, though, I'm looking only at one slice of the results: IT executives.

In this category, the survey received responses from 328 CIOs, 239 CTOs, and 447 VPs of IT. What interests me most is what the survey reveals about median compensation for IT executives "of a certain age" and for females in these leadership roles. Let's start with the basics: How much do IT leaders earn? The table below shows median compensation levels for each job title over the past three years.

Read the rest of this story on Enterprise Efficiency.

Susan Nunziata works closely with the site's content team and contributors to guide topics, direct strategies, and pursue new ideas, all in the interest of sharing practicable insights with our community. Nunziata was most recently Director of Editorial for ... View Full Bio

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pjckmen123
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pjckmen123,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/2/2014 | 5:58:05 AM
Re: Blame the Boss
Oh Yes! I'm glad I found your article today. I recommend it to everyone .. Thank you for your work! y8
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/28/2014 | 8:52:24 PM
Re: Same problem, different reasons
@Michael: I've seen no studies that answer your questions, though I'm going to keep looking as I would love to know the answers.

Anecdotally, I do agree with you broadly speaking. I have seen some women who were able to succeed while being "tough as nails," but the attributes of assertiveness and self-confidence that we encourage in men is often disparaged in women. and might possibly hurt them in the long run.

I don't know enough about jill Abramson's case (other than what we've all read in the news) to know for sure if this was the reason for her firing, but as a woman I'm sure glad that it put this issue on the front burner in the mainstream news media.

Bias against women also exists because of our ability to bear children. While I"m childless by choice, I have friends who have never been able to fully recover their salaries because they decided to take a few years out of the workforce when their children were born.

Curious to know: Have Any other women (or men) here experienced that kind of wage setback after taking extended time off for childcare?
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/28/2014 | 8:46:37 PM
Re: Blame the Boss
@TerryB: THAT is a fantastic question and something that has troubled me for years. In many organiations, HR does not have the power it used to have. I've worked in companies where HR was treated as a "girl's dept" where the work was really about administering health plans and 401K, not truly providing support for the human beings working at the place. (for the record, that is NOT the case at my current place of employment, which has the best HR team I've ever worked with).

It's hard to generalize, but in my experience, HR is given a salary range by those who hold the budget strings and are rewarded for bringing in the best person at the lowest price. Without the empowerment of upper management, many in HR may feel uncomfortable pushing back against the trend?

That's purely conjecture on my part--I'd love to hear from some HR folks out there what their experiences have been.
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Author
5/28/2014 | 3:35:05 PM
Re: Same problem, different reasons
I'm surprised neither that women typically ask for lower starting salaries nor that they ask less frequently for raises. But here's a related question that I'm less certain of: When women do negotiate like men theoretically do, and when they do asks more frequently for raises, how does their rate of success compare to that of their male colleagues? What are the political consequences when a male tries to make a move, versus when a female does so?

In my personal observation, when men are seen as tough negotiators, they're often praised for their shrewd business insight. But when women take on this and other traditionally "male" characteristics, they're often labeled as cold, or catty, or difficult to work with. I'm not sure if Jill Abramson actually fell victim to this sort of bias, or if the NY times fired her for more legitimate reasons. But if there's anything positive about her dismissal, it's that it caused more people to ask whether gender plays a role in professional decisions.

 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
5/28/2014 | 12:59:47 PM
Re: Blame the Boss
Hmmm. You and @Sunny seem to be pretty versed on this issue but I'm curious how this can still be such a problem when so many HR people I've seen in my travels are women? Our top HR person here is a woman. Why would they support anything like that?
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/28/2014 | 10:05:06 AM
Re: Blame the Boss
Working with mentors and creating a great support network of male and female peers is a fantastic idea, not only for salary-related issues but for all the ups and downs everyone experiences throughout their career, @snunyc. Sometimes it's easier to blame gender, age, color, or other 'obvious' reason for a hurdle; sometimes that IS the case. Sometimes, it's not. A colleague or peer may have more experience, be better at the job, or have another reason for their higher salary or increased responsibilities. Your network can give you insight. Your manager (and supporters) should point out ways you can improve your role, salary, and responsibilities, too.

 
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/28/2014 | 12:06:23 AM
Re: Blame the Boss
@Alison: Jeez, that's depressing, i have to say I continue to be amazed, and angered, every time I hear that kind of attitude perpetuated. There's no doubt we face an uphill battle as women. And, in general, more openness about salary would benefit all workers.

I'm sorry the negotiating ploy didn't work out so well for your friend. It's improtant to ask for what you think you're worth, and also important to have some idea of the ballpark limits that the person on the other side of the negotiating table may have to operate under. A good way to practice these skills is to go out and try to buy a car.

:)

In all seriousness, this topic of equal pay also speaks to the importance of women building a network of male and female peers to whom we can turn with questions so we can fully investigate a potential employer to the best of our ability.
Alison_Diana
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Alison_Diana,
User Rank: Author
5/27/2014 | 9:44:42 AM
Re: Blame the Boss
I'm angry the 'husband' comment doesn't surprise me. A few months ago, i wrote a series of articles on the now-down site Internet Evolution about women in tech. Several commenters -- some of whom were regular members of the IE community -- posted thoughts such as a 'woman could always be a housewife' or 'her husband will support her.' I was blown away by this ancient thinking. 

Women should take lessons in negotiating if they feel lacking in that department. And, as you say @snunyc, it's smart business to ask a little more than you expect (I recall it backfiring on one former colleague who asked for a lot more money when switching companies!). Women should not be victims but a dearth of information means you do operate in the dark. I admire those handful of companies that openly share employees' salaries. I doubt, but hope, they start a trend.
Susan_Nunziata
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Susan_Nunziata,
User Rank: Strategist
5/23/2014 | 3:02:19 PM
Re: Same problem, different reasons
@Laurianne: The Internet has made finding such information a lot easier than it ever has been. Sites such as Glassdoor and Dice are really helpful as well in finding out how your salary compares to others in your field and in your region. Glassdoor also rates employers which is helpful when job searching.

Once you get into the upper echelons of a publicly traded organization, many of the senior leaders' salaries are publicly available and detailed in annual reports, which is another resource for those seeking high-level positions. In fact, it's wise to always read the annual report of a company you're considering working for to find out how much the senior executives are compensated. It can give you a valuable sense of the organization's culture, IMHO.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
5/23/2014 | 2:51:10 PM
Re: Same problem, different reasons
I agree women must help each other and help themselves. That is one reason I have signed on to mentor some younger women.

The issue of comparing your pay to others in the company has never been simple. This is a closely guarded secret in most companies and affects both men and women. It is up to the individual to use salary surveys, personal networks, and industry contacts to learn about salaries at similar companies.
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