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12/9/2013
09:06 AM
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The Upside Of Hostility

The defining quality of the DevOps movement can challenge the default division of labor.
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Coverlet
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Coverlet,
User Rank: Strategist
12/18/2013 | 5:43:39 PM
Re: That which we call a rose...
Most break-fix teams are a response to inadequate quality processes on the dev side (whether internal or vendor).  So it's not a business or customer problem per se.  In Venn-speak, break-fix is a reaction to the lack of overlap in two critical functions.  And it's the wrong reaction because it fails to engineer an intentional overlap.

As for new/ehanced-features-as-business-problem, that's too vague for me to try to be helpful.   I'd need more information about your company's business- and customer context.  If you're unconstrained by your company's social media policies, post more detail here.  Otherwise, feel free to reach out to me via email.
bchristian441
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bchristian441,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/18/2013 | 4:34:38 PM
That which we call a rose...
I like the thought exercise and was hoping you would post an example solution.  This is particularly timely as my company is making another "tweak" to the IT organization.  If you explore the original statement for a business problem to solve, there are two that spring to mind: support the application by fixing bugs (including ones induced by the manufacturer releasing new versions of the platform), and support the business by delivering new or enhanced functions in the application.  Niether sounds like a good fit to name the problem and the team.
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
12/10/2013 | 12:25:16 AM
Much easier said then done
This is one of the best commentaries I've read on the overall problem of business, and the IT business in particular. We've not made much progress anywhere, but if I could name an area, it would be in DevOps. The nature of the barriers is understood, the need to surmount them, liikewise. A few willing steeplechase enthusiasts (overcoming one barrier is not enough) have actually been able to do so. They've proven the value of the concept. Can we sustain the gains? Prevent recidivism? Ummmmm, maybe, maybe not. But we have to keep making the specialist more of a generalist, and the generalist has to keep learning new and specifically useful things in his moment in time.  
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
12/9/2013 | 5:31:54 PM
"Experience"
I like the focus on experience, since it's quite the trendy word. Too often "experience" is about copying some other company's experience (per the milk foam over analytics), even though many times what customers value is having as little "experience" as possible -- get my thing done and get out.
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
12/9/2013 | 11:34:57 AM
"Engineers" is a scary verb
Engineers and other left-brain types tend to underestimate the stomach-churning feeling that the concept of trying to understand exactly what developers (or [insert tech here]) actually *do* instills in a typical generalist. And, technologists like to encourage this state of affairs by sprinkling acronyms like cinnamon on a pumpkin latte. That's a big part of the problem, I think.
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Author
12/9/2013 | 9:43:44 AM
Adaptive Specialists
Adaptive specialists. I think you've coined an HR term, Coverlet. Without having put a name to it, I find myself looking for just such qualities in an editorial hire. 
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