Strategic CIO // IT Strategy
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7/25/2014
07:06 AM
David Wagner
David Wagner
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Geekend: Robot Vs. Human Smackdown

Who would win a fistfight between a man and a robot? Take a look at the evidence, and see if you agree with our conclusion.

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David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/31/2014 | 5:15:49 PM
Re: Thinking ones scare me the most
@kstaron- I see that, but I also see the flip side. Leaning with no emotion means no hatred either. 
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 2:21:36 PM
Thinking ones scare me the most
Robots that can learn are by definition the scariest. Because when you learn but have no emotions you can come to a great logical conclusion that has no empathy. Think I Robot, where enslaving the human race to protect them from themselves makes perfect sense. Never mind the ethical and philosophical issues of machines becoming so good at thinking they may develop a sense of self.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 1:05:43 PM
Re: Robot Vs. Human Smackdown
@zerox203- Thanks. I do think one of the issues is the teams being divided, but not necessarily by distance but by intellectual property law. If I make a catching robot, I have IP on that. If someone else makes a fast robot, they have IP on that. So now if I want to make a fast moving catching robot, I have to either re-invent the wheel on the speed thing in a way that doesn't violate their IP or I have to license. Since commercial opportunities are still limited, licensing doesn't make sense.

So I think we've got people making lots of parts of a really assume robot and someone (the Defense Department? Google?) will have to put up the money to pull all of these together into a realy fast robot that sings while it catches balls and plays chess. We're probably going to see the same problem in robots that we see in smart phones. Competing companies will be paying each other every time they make a robot because of all the patent suits.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/29/2014 | 12:59:29 PM
Re: Robot Vs. Human Smackdown
Another very interesting topic, and I really like the direction you've taken this one, Dave. Doing it by the numbers wouldn't really do the topic justice (and doesn't really reflect the 'intangibles' that would no doubt come up in a real fight), but keeping it in a controlled setting (no weapons, etc.) allows us some room to set up defined paramaters and base our conclusion on something ("robot" is too broad a category to just be shooting in the dark).  I agree with you giving the belt to humans, too - Even though just looking at the categories, the "score" is 2-2, the "intangibles" cateogory counts for too much to ignore. Maybe we could design a specific robot that could beat a specific human under specific conditions... but if we ran 100 variations with different conditions and people, I bet the people would win more.

It is funny how difficult it seems to be to combine these disparate technologies into one robot or system. Maybe it's more a socioeconomic barrier than a technological one - the people making the catching robot are in France (I assume from the name) and the people making the singing robot are in Japan. That already creates a huge barrier for connecting the research and technologies. Nevertheless, it seems that we're waiting for that one 'aha!' moment that will let us make robots that are less one-track and more interoperable. Maybe that will lead us to what futurists call 'the singularity'...
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 4:50:39 PM
Re: Advantage: Humans
@David. I agree. you know by now, I thought we will be having space or moon colonies.  I was disappointed that we went to space but we can't seem to go back.  I guess now that the government don't have that much money to spend we can't just get people out of earth as we did in the past.

 
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 1:20:04 PM
Re: Advantage: Humans
@Thomas- Ha! Well yeah, but we already know what would happen between say a drone and a human pilot or a soldier versus a robot weapons platform. They'd be toast.

The drones can out turn a human in a plane because they don't have to worry about blacking out. So they'd win. A robot weapon platform carries way more firepower than a human could (though I'll admit that they are't nearly as smart).

This seemed like the fight we hadn't really talked about. And it felt the most human somehow.
David Wagner
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David Wagner,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 1:15:08 PM
Re: Advantage: Humans
I don't see a robot with all the qualities you have discusses still far away.  My prediction may be in a 100 year.


A hundred years? That seems fairly extreme to me, Pedro. It was only a little over 50 years between the Wright Brothers putting a plane in the air and Sputnik. 60 years to we put people on the moon.

100 years is a lot of time in engineering, especially since we've already had out Kitty Hawk moment in robots. That said, it is funny how having an automonmous robot doing all of these things at once is so much harder than sending a spacecraft out of our own solar system, spmething we've already accomplished.
LUFU
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LUFU,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 1:40:14 PM
To Err is Human
And hopefully the robots in our future will have the ability to forgive even though they are not divine.

Robots are wired to make consistent predictive actions within specific parameters as prescribed by humans. Ironically, judging by events in the news, humans are far less predictive.
Hospice_Houngbo
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Hospice_Houngbo,
User Rank: Strategist
7/26/2014 | 11:55:21 PM
Re: Advantage: Humans
@Michelle

You are right. There is no robot without its creator. 

We make them and service them. 
nomii
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nomii,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 5:57:12 PM
Re: Advantage: Humans
@Bhori nice one. I belive that if humans are putting their brains there then we can expect anything. Unless these robots are made to think of their own we can expect anything.  :)
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