Strategic CIO // IT Strategy
Commentary
9/3/2014
11:45 AM
Marty Parker
Marty Parker
Commentary
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How To Spot An Obsolete Communications Strategy

Consider these topologies and approaches to lower costs, improve productivity, and drive new business.

If your PBX is obsolete, your communications capabilities are probably obsolete, too. Consider these questions:

Are you still using telephone company trunks for all your employees' external calls?

Are you still paying for telephone lines for remote workers?

Are you still connecting to your mobile workers through the PBX?

Is telecommunications still a separate department from IT, in charge of only voice and video?

If you answered yes to any of them, it's time for a change.

The new, optimized communications network topology is based on the dramatic technology advances described in my previous three commentaries for InformationWeek. The new model, which defines communications in terms of IT architectures, usage profiles, and applications, provides compelling reasons to change your topology to lower costs, improve productivity, and even drive new business.

• By creating usage profiles, for example, you might find that half of your employees aren't in the office when they communicate, so why haul their communications traffic through the firewall or provide all those T1 or newer SIP trunks to serve them? By moving their communications services to the cloud or to cellular networks, this traffic disappears from your network, dramatically reducing your on-premises telco trunks.

[Don't let your company lapse into digital inertia. Read 5 Ways To Beat The Digital Disruption Curse.]

If you have an Ethernet backbone or MPLS connection to a cloud service provider, the calls between the mobile teams and the on-site workers will be charged at the low rates for IP bandwidth, not at the rates for SIP trunks, which can be 300% higher. Some mobile carrier services, such as Sprint's Mobile Integration (SMI), let the cellular phone look like an endpoint on your MPLS network. Calls from and to on-premises employees arrive as IP backbone calls, rather than as tariffed calls across the public network and the telco trunks.

• If your mobile and remote users and administrative/information workers already do their work from cloud-based applications such as Salesforce.com and Microsoft Dynamics, you can embed communications tools directly into those apps and effectively move those communications workloads off the enterprise network.

If you have a cloud-based conferencing service, there's no need to have another peak capacity conferencing system in your data center for conferences between mobile teams or between mobile workers and their customers or partners. With innovative options from Microsoft (Office 365), Cisco (WebEx), Vidyo, and other vendors, a conference can be split between a cloud service and an on-premises server with only one high-bandwidth IP backbone connection between the two. Then each participant doesn't have to join the conference across telco trunks or through the firewall.

• Unified communication (UC) federation can also lower costs. Federation -- the ability for two UC systems to share presence, instant messaging, and voice or video calls securely -- can provide a rich, encrypted IP connection to trusted customers or partners. These federated sessions will flow across the Internet or Ethernet backbone services, not over the more expensive public switched phone network. A company can also connect its UC system with a cloud federation service, which then connects to any number of other UC systems and users.

• Savings are also possible if voice calls to and from major customers or partners can flow across a specific carrier's MPLS network to which both parties subscribe, effectively bypassing the public phone network.

• If you can change how people communicate, as shown in the 7 Ways and Usage Profile articles, you can lower costs by reducing major bandwidth or trunk capacity. Having employees use the presence feature to find only those people who are available before placing a call can typically cut a company's voice traffic load by 20%. Using IM or text messaging instead of a phone call can cut another 20% from busy hour traffic and bandwidth needs.

Savings opportunities like these are made possible by major communications technology advances. For example,

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Marty Parker, Principal and co-founder of UniComm Consulting, has more than three decades of experience with computing and communications technologies. He has been a leader in strategic planning and product line management for IBM, AT&T, Lucent, and Avaya. Now, as ... View Full Bio
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Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
9/4/2014 | 2:21:01 AM
Savings and Increased Communication
A consumer can switch some of their communication needs from the public network to an IP network, for instance, cellular minutes consumed can be lowered by using Skype. A small change can convert a consumer's bill from $162 to $46. It would also allow the user to switch to video, if audio is falling short in providing the desired level of communication, increasing the quality of communication. Multiply these savings with a large user-base in an enterprise setting, and the savings gained can make a business competitive in the market place. 
Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
9/8/2014 | 11:02:30 PM
Re: Savings and Increased Communication
One thing that I see in the SF Bay Area is that many companies don't eve have a phone system.  They rely on cell phones and more accurately texting.  It is a new world and a new day there are certainly needs for phone systems in large corporations, health care space and companies that require call centers but fewer and fewer phone systems are being sold and more and more are hosted.  Unified Communications as it is is really cloud based and work flow based, in my humble opinion
Brian.Dean
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Brian.Dean,
User Rank: Ninja
9/9/2014 | 11:04:39 PM
Re: Savings and Increased Communication
That is a good point, I feel, as generation Y begins to gain experience in the workplace, this generation is going to employ modes of communication that they are familiar with and that offer a high level of efficiency. Text is good because an employee can go over information and review it again in-order to extract greater value.

Another area that I feel is changing is the mode by which employees are gaining information and knowledge. Books used to be the primary source of information, but now real-time information is becoming increasingly important.
Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
9/10/2014 | 11:08:22 AM
Re: Savings and Increased Communication Plus Information
Brian - Your comment "now real-time information is becoming increasingly important" is so true it is amazing what information is available and at our ifinger tips.  Once you can filter through the ads you can find information on anything quickly and with amazing accuracey.  This internet of things is truely amazing.
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