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3/14/2014
04:03 PM
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Network Engineers: Don't Be The Dinosaur

Network pros: Want a future in software-defined networking? You can't stick with the old ways of working.

The way networks are conceived and managed is no longer about individual components; it's about the whole. Vendors want IT consumers to see their networks as integrated systems providing an end-to-end group of services that work together to deliver an application. For network engineers, this means big changes ahead.

Most network pros are used to point solutions: Firewalls go in certain places; network switches are sized for port density, throughput, and function, and placed accordingly; and WAN routers connect non-Ethernet circuits to enterprises and campuses. For the most part, each of those elements is managed individually.

The implications of this go beyond daily network operations. The greater challenge is executing a network design across a diverse infrastructure. This is a difficult task, requiring that architects intimately understand application requirements and behavior, and that network hardware and software can deliver those requirements. Consequently, network designs often stop at connectivity: As long as the network is delivering IP relatively quickly, that's good enough. This is the plumber's perspective, and it's the wrong one to hold in the context of modern IT.

Unification of IT policy delivery up and down the stack is the wave of the future. Networking can take its cues from the virtualization and automation folks. Those people can create deliver new instances of applications in minutes, automating the installation of an operating system, storage, and virtual network connectivity.

Read the rest of this article on Network Computing.

Ethan Banks, CCIE #20655, is a hands-on networking practitioner who has designed, built and maintained networks for higher education, state government, financial institutions, and technology corporations. Ethan is also a host of the Packet Pushers Podcast. The technical ... View Full Bio

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ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
3/14/2014 | 4:53:51 PM
Far enough?
Do you think being a "networking pro" itself is too limited? Or do you need expertise across the datacenter to really be valuable? I'm wondering if the plum jobs will be less tied to software defined networking and more software definied datacenter.
chucktatham
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chucktatham,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2014 | 8:58:32 AM
The same can be said for a bunch of IT roles in the era of the SDDC
Great theme to your article.  The more converged infrastructure becomes and the more software controlled it is, the more it requires a re-think of not only roles but org structures as well.  Siloed disciplines and areas of responsiblity become problematic.  For example capacity management becomes something that can no longer be a periodic planning activity by a small group and must become an integrated part of daily infrastructure management and cover network, storage, compute and also even software licensing control.
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