Strategic CIO // Team Building & Staffing
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1/3/2014
09:06 AM
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8 Hot IT Jobs For 2014

What IT skills and roles will be in demand this year? Recruiters share the scoop.

5. Mobile developers. Stop the presses: Mobility is hot. Specifically, IT pros with legit mobile development skills can effectively call their own shots right now. Hart of Eliassen points to mobile as a job category that essentially has negative unemployment: There are more open positions than qualified people to fill them.

"While there have been plenty of early adopters, many companies are just starting to figure out how to either enhance access or boost sales, related to their product and service offerings," Hart says. "Mobile application developers are in great demand, and this will continue for some time to come. If you're looking to secure your employment status for the long-term, enhance your mobile app development skills."

6.The "old" reliables: .NET and Java developers. Sticking with the development side of IT, Cullen of Modis expects .NET and Java programmers to have no trouble finding work in 2014. The two platforms remain ubiquitous in application development. They're "going to remain relatively hot," he predicts.

7. Business Analysts (BAs) and Project Managers (PMs). Cullen said his firm's clients continue to seek qualified BAs and PMs for their IT organizations. Both are "old" job titles. What's changing, Cullen said, is that employers are increasingly seeking very specific experience and skills in those roles. "What companies are looking for, instead of just bringing in a generic BA or PM, they're looking -- particularly in the financial services sector -- for some real specific areas," Cullen said. For example, "derivatives experience, capital markets experiences, low latency-high frequency experience -- they want skills very specific to a type of application in those areas."

8. Small and midsized business (SMB) IT pros. This one's not so much a skill set as a growing employer pool. Cullen said Modis's SMB accounts have robust hiring plans heading into the new year. "Companies that used to have maybe a one- or two-person IT staff are expanding that to four or five." He attributes that expansion to several factors: business growth, competitive advantages, and -- perhaps most of all -- more SMBs figuring out how IT investments can help them cut costs in other areas of their organizations. In other words: SMBs aren't necessarily adding headcount overall, but instead are redirecting existing resources into IT -- welcome news for job-hunters.

What's not hot? Traditional telecommunications roles will shrink as more and more businesses move into cloud environments, according to Cullen. (Cloud computing, meanwhile, can be a lucrative career path.)

Cullen also says IT pros with Oracle and SAP skills may find a flatter job market next year. He points to the expensive, cyclical, and sometimes slow-moving nature of large enterprise software deployments as the reason: 2014 may simply be a quieter year for internal enterprise application projects.

"The demand for Oracle and SAP -- I can't say it's gone dramatically down. But it's not as robust as some of the other areas," says Cullen. "A lot of these companies over the past two years have invested in their enterprise [applications], so maybe it's going to be a little bit less of an investment on that side [in 2014], as opposed to a big increase in investment on their web side."

Kevin Casey is a writer based in North Carolina who writes about technology for small and midsized businesses.

These five higher education CIOs are driving critical changes in an industry ripe for digital disruption. Also in the Chiefs Of The Year issue of InformationWeek: Stop bragging about your Agile processes and make them better. (Free registration required.)

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shasstar
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shasstar,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/24/2014 | 11:23:44 AM
Guidewire Development
Do you have any idea about the GuideWire ( comes under Insurance Domain).
Demand of a GuideWire developer in international market and in terms of salary, how good it is ?

And future scope of this skill ?
Sacalpha1
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Sacalpha1,
User Rank: Strategist
1/22/2014 | 10:47:45 PM
Re: Cloud takes a bite out of SAP/Oracle Jobs?
@ D. Henschen

While I think demand for Oracle and SAP skills is probably flat at present, I disagree with your market share assertion.  There are two primary markets for most of the cloud based apps.  The first is small and medium sized businesses (SMBs).  As these businesses grow out of Quickbooks, Peachtree Accouting and the like, they are tending to purchase cloud based apps like Intacct, NetSuite, Workday, etc.  In most cases these SMBs are not large enough or complex enough to consider an Oracle or SAP solution....these solutions are just overkill for them.  Neither Oracle or SAP have been particularly strong or focused in this SMB space in the past.  This is a place where they are losing potential market share (assuming they want to play in this market), but are not losing existing market share.  The second area are functions in larger companies like sales or HR that refuse to follow the corporate standards or have some unique, unsupported need.  Cloud apps vendors play to this market because the apps can be used without IT involvement and without corporate approval.  They also tend not to integrate with other corporate apps and they are certainly not replacing core Oracle or SAP installs in these situations.  As before, its debatable whether this is taking market share or not.  I would say its more of a market being created where one did not exist in the past and what we may find in a few years is that the cloud apps get replaced once the core ERP/CRM app implementation efforts catch up and can roll in these rebel or unsupported business functions.


I have challenged on this before for someone to show the proof that larger companies are really scraping their core ERP/CRM installs and replacing the technology with cloud apps.  I just don't think the business case exists.  And these companies are large enough that they can get the benefits of virtualization within their own data centers and using their own staff.  They don't have to swap out apps to do it.


What is happening with cloud apps in the market place is much more complicated than most reports spell out.  If people are going to comment on this, they need to stop making generic, blanket statements that are just not true and provide a proper analysis that gets to the real facts and to what is really happening in the market place.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
1/6/2014 | 11:53:47 PM
Re: DevOps+ cloud and mobile skills
Thanks a lot - you pointed out an important aspect of system administrator's job. When I was an engineer, I use to find out that most of my time were eaten by things like creating documentation, raising and closing troubleshooting ticket and answering technical queries from various parties. Sometimes I am not able to bear weight.:-)
tnguyengp
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tnguyengp,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/6/2014 | 9:47:58 PM
IT recruiting
In addition to these specific skills, companies need developers that take a holistic perspective on technology. They do not simply know one programming language or one skill. They understand how to work with different platforms -- desktops, mobile, cloud -- to name a few. They have to understand information management, security, and integration. Most importantly, they need to manage the relationship between technology components from how it impacts the business.

Than Nguyen

Dallas IT jobs 
cbabcock
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cbabcock,
User Rank: Strategist
1/6/2014 | 7:56:57 PM
Virtual system analyst?
This is a good list, but I would add virtualization admin or virtualization manager -- the art of commissioning, managing and tearing down virtual machines. It's one of the fastest growing roles in the data center. And I would also suggest a new role is emerging, that of collecting and analyzing machine intelligence for the improved management of virtual systems. It's a big data job, not a day by day operational job.
Susan Fogarty
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Susan Fogarty,
User Rank: Author
1/6/2014 | 2:53:14 PM
Re: DevOps+ cloud and mobile skills
Somedude8, I like your analogy. We do tend to get very bogged down in the nuances around terminology (especially we editors). I swear, I am still reading articles that discuss the "real" definithion of unified communications, which people started talking about 7 or 8 years ago. The meaning of the term is not what is important, it is the value of the actual thing to the user, or the pratitioner (or the spy!)
danielcawrey
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danielcawrey,
User Rank: Ninja
1/6/2014 | 2:20:29 PM
Re: DevOps+ cloud and mobile skills
The demand for Linux skills is only going to increase. Microsoft's competing solutions are often very expensive, and Linux is known to be a lot more stable. It is making a lot of inroads into automobiles too, as several car manufacturers have used Linux for their infotainment systems; Android is popular in this space too. 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
1/6/2014 | 10:15:36 AM
Re: DevOps+ cloud and mobile skills
Every system does need adminstration, my point is only the big companies can afford to have someone who only does that. At smaller companies, application guys like me just fill in for that. If you have something really heavy duty, you can always bring in a contractor for the couple hours of work you need. Implementing virtual server(s) is perfect example. Do you really need a full time guy when you only spin those up once in blue moon?

One of reason I love the IBM i5 (formally AS400) so much is it essentially eliminated the need for dedicated system operations type person, which was impossible in the mainframe MVS/370 world we migrated from. They made it so easy to do routine stuff, like apply patches and manage work in system. Not to mention fact you can't kill with a stick, you use servers for 7-10 years and routinely go over a year without even rebooting them.

Windows has come a long way in that regard, although they need rebooting far more often. The problem with Linux is it take a pretty knowledgeable person to administer, thus my comparison back to MVS/370 days. Linux (and it's core ancestor UNIX) is a fine rock solid o/s when it is running. It is just not completely obvious how to get it running to someone who is basically a programmer/analyst.

Do some of you out there work in 1-2 person shops where you do both Linux admin and app development? I'm curious to know.
samicksha
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samicksha,
User Rank: Strategist
1/6/2014 | 2:47:08 AM
Re: DevOps+ cloud and mobile skills
If you account system admin on just uptime and performance then yes, as an admin you might not have a hectic schedule. But your Responsibility for documenting the configuration of the system and entertaining technical queries will definitely grow.
Li Tan
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Li Tan,
User Rank: Ninja
1/5/2014 | 10:46:43 PM
Re: DevOps+ cloud and mobile skills
Don't worry, my friend - for sure we need system adminsitrators. Yes virtualization with KVM, vSphere, etc. is the trend and getting more and more popular. But the system administrator is definitely needed in the background. The difference is that, you need to possess more up-to-date skills, especially virtual server management and good understanding of cloud computing. The job will exist but you need to update your knowledge to get qualified.:-)
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