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7/24/2014
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Where The IT Jobs Aren't: Tech

IT jobs in the tech sector will stall while non-tech industries will drive IT job growth, impacting job geography and skills, says new report.

9 Job Hunt Tips For Older IT Pros
9 Job Hunt Tips For Older IT Pros
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IT job creation within the technology sector will stall or decline through 2018, with non-tech industries such as manufacturing, automotive, healthcare, and retail driving IT job growth instead, according to a new report from advisory company CEB.

This shift will create increased competition for IT talent and a new IT job skillset, and will force organizations to think beyond traditional talent pools and candidate profiles to attract and retain the best employees.

The IT sector employs only about one-third of the total IT workforce, while non-IT industries employ the remaining two-thirds of private sector IT workers, according to the report, which analyzed more than 900 cities and 1,000 skills.

[How does your job stack up? Read IT Salaries: 8 Cold Hard Facts.]

As IT sector employment stalls as a percentage of the total US IT workforce, non-IT sectors will expand: The manufacturing and automotive industries are forecasted to most aggressively grow the share of the workforce, followed by healthcare, retail, and aerospace and defense, the report said, leading to a greater geographic diversity of jobs.

Last year, 67% of IT workers in the US were concentrated in 10 states. But untraditional talent hubs for the IT workforce are emerging, based on their high demand for workers. Pennsylvania, Georgia, Illinois, and Texas ranked in the top seven states with the most IT job openings, according to the report.

"As technology-enabled products and services become more important to the innovation agenda of companies not traditionally defined as IT companies, both the demand and the supply of IT talent is growing beyond historical state and city IT talent hubs such as San Francisco or Seattle," the report said.

Lower costs and availability of skilled talent have made Philadelphia, Oklahoma City, Charlotte, Chicago, Houston, and Atlanta popular locations. Last year, the number of open jobs as a percentage of the total IT workforce was at or above 30% in Philadelphia and Oklahoma City, for example, while the San Francisco Bay area and New York were at about 12%, the report said.

"The good news is that individuals looking for jobs may be able to find tech jobs much closer to home since they don't need to move to Washington D.C., Texas, or California," said Jean Martin, executive director at CEB, in an interview.  "The bad news is that the demand for skills is shifting toward more complex tech positions, which means baseline tech skills are commoditizing and they need to take their skills to the next level to do these jobs."

According to the report, the top five skills in demand by city highlight a considerable shift from traditional skills such as C and C++ to Web, .NET, and mobile skills. Six new emerging roles include technology brokers, cloud integration specialists, collaboration evangelists, service architects, user experience designers, and information insight enablers, according to CEB.

Given the growth of IT jobs in non-IT sectors, this shift is natural, Martin said.

"Industries like hospitality, retail, and manufacturing aren't interested in C++, they're interested in who can manage an IT-enabled customer interface," she pointed out. "It's the liberal arts of technology jobs -- we're seeing companies start to bring in hard tech skills with broader business-based and customer management skills."

As a result, job seekers will need to expand their skill set in order to stay relevant and desirable. "In order to compete for jobs, people will have to go much farther to differentiate themselves," Martin noted. "They will need to be customer experience experts or data experts to do these much more creative jobs on the tech side. We're going to see a different education and career path in the future."

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Kristin Burnham currently serves as InformationWeek.com's Senior Editor, covering social media, social business, IT leadership and IT careers. Prior to joining InformationWeek in July 2013, she served in a number of roles at CIO magazine and CIO.com, most recently as senior ... View Full Bio

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Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 11:08:55 PM
Re: New IT roles
@ Kristin - Your comment is absolutely true that people work long hours and it comes donw to a convenience factor.  And it is a tool to keep people in hte office, there is no real reason to leave work, just eat  and keepon working, if yoiu are tiered there is some fresh coffee to keep you going too.  Perks and manipulation, with a reward.
Broadway0474
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0%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 9:27:37 PM
Re: New IT roles
@TerryB, consider me educated ... or on my way to being educated. Your guess is right that I just haven't been in an environment where SharePoint has been used to its potential. I have been in places where it's been promised ... eventually ... to be used.
TerryB
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0%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 1:24:01 PM
Re: New IT roles
@Broadway, I'm going into my evangelist role just for you. First, Sharepoint does much, much more than the world email lives in. You can build an intranet with it, extend it to places where email just doesn't go. Here, we extend it to the shopfloor guys, who have no email. We use Lotus Notes, the fully loaded cost of a Notes license for us is about $700 a year by the time Corp allocates a portion of our global WAN cost back to us. We have about 40 concurrent shopfloor guys. The guys can use Sharepoint to see company announcements and access ISO controlled work instructions.

We've implemented a version of Announcement web part that we call a Whiteboard and I have one on every Home page of every shopfloor workgroup and one associated with every office department. People in office can ask for an Alert on their Whiteboard, when someone posts to it you get an email with the post. This gives us a way to have electronic dialog with shopfloor without them having email.

SP doesn't replace email, it complements it. Email is fine for asking Joe Bob where he wants to go for lunch today. But if you are exchanging info on how to do something in your company, it would have much more leverage if stored in a FAQ Discussion forum for anyone to reference it. Who is ever going to find your private email in future, including probably yourself?

That is where this evangelist role is targeted, getting serial emailers to actually change their behavior and use a FAQ knowledge base to share with the NEXT guy who might be filling job of guy you are emailing.

Even mundane things like company announcements/news. Sure you can create a massive group email list and send it to everyone. Lot of overhead on that versus just posting to company news list and letting people go read it when they are ready. Again, with alerts, they can end up with an email if they choose. But most people are looking to reduce email, Sharepoint and other software like it are a tool to do so.

I'm not even going to go into all the other things Sharepoint can do, KPI metrics, wikis, etc. And I'm just talking about the "free" SP, not the Enterprise licensed stuff which gives you Excel Services and stuff. I did not find sufficient ROI to justify that versus other techniques of doing same thing. Meaning, we don't need to have two people working on same Excel at same time.

But my point is, if you are equating Sharepoint/collaboration to email and DropBox, you have some stuff to learn about it.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2014 | 10:52:48 AM
Re: New IT roles
We're delving into those new titles this week in a separate story. Stay tuned.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2014 | 10:51:08 AM
Re: New IT roles
Tough to survive and might explain why so many companies in the valley offer free food at work, the employees can't afford to eat.

^^working long hours is likely another reason, too.
Broadway0474
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100%
Broadway0474,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 9:39:10 PM
Re: New IT roles
Not sure why you can't just use a filesharing service like Box or DropBox. Stay nimble, give people the resources they need, and the simplest communication tools --- IM or email -- then get out of their way. Collaboration tools like SharePoint are just a form of buracracy. 
nasimson
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50%
nasimson,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 2:23:42 AM
Re: online work at home,
Ed, please have some spam filters in place. Such posts are irritating and distracting.
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 2:19:11 AM
Employment trends
Thanks for sharing an interesting survey results. It's always good to know about employment trends. Whats a little surprising is that growth in Manufacturing IT jobs is supposed to be higher than Supply Chain IT jobs. Hasn't it been the other way round for last so many years? Am I reading it right in the first place?
asksqn
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50%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 3:56:35 PM
It's all about the lowest paid workers
Given the on-going Depression 2.0 American economy, as well as the fact that corporate America has continued to outsource, downsize, right-size and otherwise import masses of H1B visa workers in a treasonous effort to drive down wages for American citizens, I find it terribly difficult to believe that there is a "skills shortage."  This has been the traditional rallying cry for companies not wanting to pay fair market wages for the knowledge, skills, abilities & education the industry claims it wants.  And members of Congress, being as completely clueless and tone-deaf as usual to everythng except dollar signs in their bank accounts has been the industry lapdog opening the floodgates into this country for cheap, imported, highly skilled guest workers.   Secondly, the IT industry would do well to actually welcome all those candidates possessing the appropriate skill sets who apply for the alleged vacancies, but as it currently stands, IT in the US is restricted to males under age 25, everyone else not in that demographic is perfunctorily tossed aside. 
asksqn
0%
100%
asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 3:56:34 PM
It's all about the lowest paid workers
Given the on-going Depression 2.0 American economy, as well as the fact that corporate America has continued to outsource, downsize, right-size and otherwise import masses of H1B visa workers in a treasonous effort to drive down wages for American citizens, I find it terribly difficult to believe that there is a "skills shortage."  This has been the traditional rallying cry for companies not wanting to pay fair market wages for the knowledge, skills, abilities & education the industry claims it wants.  And members of Congress, being as completely clueless and tone-deaf as usual to everythng except dollar signs in their bank accounts has been the industry lapdog opening the floodgates into this country for cheap, imported, highly skilled guest workers.   Secondly, the IT industry would do well to actually welcome all those candidates possessing the appropriate skill sets who apply for the alleged vacancies, but as it currently stands, IT in the US is restricted to males under age 25, everyone else not in that demographic is perfunctorily tossed aside. 
<<   <   Page 2 / 5   >   >>
2014 US Salary Survey: 10 Stats
2014 US Salary Survey: 10 Stats
InformationWeek surveyed 11,662 IT pros across 30 industries about their pay, benefits, job satisfaction, outsourcing, and more. Some of the results will surprise you.
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