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7/24/2014
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Where The IT Jobs Aren't: Tech

IT jobs in the tech sector will stall while non-tech industries will drive IT job growth, impacting job geography and skills, says new report.

9 Job Hunt Tips For Older IT Pros
9 Job Hunt Tips For Older IT Pros
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IT job creation within the technology sector will stall or decline through 2018, with non-tech industries such as manufacturing, automotive, healthcare, and retail driving IT job growth instead, according to a new report from advisory company CEB.

This shift will create increased competition for IT talent and a new IT job skillset, and will force organizations to think beyond traditional talent pools and candidate profiles to attract and retain the best employees.

The IT sector employs only about one-third of the total IT workforce, while non-IT industries employ the remaining two-thirds of private sector IT workers, according to the report, which analyzed more than 900 cities and 1,000 skills.

[How does your job stack up? Read IT Salaries: 8 Cold Hard Facts.]

As IT sector employment stalls as a percentage of the total US IT workforce, non-IT sectors will expand: The manufacturing and automotive industries are forecasted to most aggressively grow the share of the workforce, followed by healthcare, retail, and aerospace and defense, the report said, leading to a greater geographic diversity of jobs.

Last year, 67% of IT workers in the US were concentrated in 10 states. But untraditional talent hubs for the IT workforce are emerging, based on their high demand for workers. Pennsylvania, Georgia, Illinois, and Texas ranked in the top seven states with the most IT job openings, according to the report.

"As technology-enabled products and services become more important to the innovation agenda of companies not traditionally defined as IT companies, both the demand and the supply of IT talent is growing beyond historical state and city IT talent hubs such as San Francisco or Seattle," the report said.

Lower costs and availability of skilled talent have made Philadelphia, Oklahoma City, Charlotte, Chicago, Houston, and Atlanta popular locations. Last year, the number of open jobs as a percentage of the total IT workforce was at or above 30% in Philadelphia and Oklahoma City, for example, while the San Francisco Bay area and New York were at about 12%, the report said.

"The good news is that individuals looking for jobs may be able to find tech jobs much closer to home since they don't need to move to Washington D.C., Texas, or California," said Jean Martin, executive director at CEB, in an interview.  "The bad news is that the demand for skills is shifting toward more complex tech positions, which means baseline tech skills are commoditizing and they need to take their skills to the next level to do these jobs."

According to the report, the top five skills in demand by city highlight a considerable shift from traditional skills such as C and C++ to Web, .NET, and mobile skills. Six new emerging roles include technology brokers, cloud integration specialists, collaboration evangelists, service architects, user experience designers, and information insight enablers, according to CEB.

Given the growth of IT jobs in non-IT sectors, this shift is natural, Martin said.

"Industries like hospitality, retail, and manufacturing aren't interested in C++, they're interested in who can manage an IT-enabled customer interface," she pointed out. "It's the liberal arts of technology jobs -- we're seeing companies start to bring in hard tech skills with broader business-based and customer management skills."

As a result, job seekers will need to expand their skill set in order to stay relevant and desirable. "In order to compete for jobs, people will have to go much farther to differentiate themselves," Martin noted. "They will need to be customer experience experts or data experts to do these much more creative jobs on the tech side. We're going to see a different education and career path in the future."

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Kristin Burnham currently serves as InformationWeek.com's Senior Editor, covering social media, social business, IT leadership and IT careers. Prior to joining InformationWeek in July 2013, she served in a number of roles at CIO magazine and CIO.com, most recently as senior ... View Full Bio

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Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 11:39:06 AM
Interesting titles
Did the report describe what, exactly, an "information insight enabler" does? Is that just another name for data scientist, perhaps at a less-stratospheric salary?
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 11:50:38 AM
Re: Interesting titles
It did not, though I'd guess an iteration of data scientist, too.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 12:00:57 PM
Re: Interesting titles
"Collaboration evangelist" has me scratching my head a bit too.
Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 4:14:30 PM
Re: Interesting titles
>"Collaboration evangelist" has me scratching my head a bit too.

If you have to evangelize collboration, that's a sure sign that it's not happening.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 1:09:22 PM
Re: Interesting titles
I'm scratching my head to what that is as well "information insight enabler".  I have heard of user interface designer and some of my friends have told me that this field is growing.  Just knowing tech skills is not enough these days
David F. Carr
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David F. Carr,
User Rank: Author
7/24/2014 | 1:43:16 PM
Re: Interesting titles
Next up: Job Title Obstrufication Enabler. VP of Obscure Titles
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 1:53:08 PM
Re: Interesting titles
It never was enough @Pedro. My BS in Comp Sci from 1985 also included a minor in business. That has probably served me better than the tech side because the technology has changed so much. That allowed me early in my career to collapse Programmer/Analyst, Project Leader and Systems Manager into a single job. Think that doesn't make you employable and valuable to your company?

I don't get all this specialization today. Skills that were part of being a Programmer/Analyst, like knowing user interface design, are now a specialty? What's next, instead of Comp Sci degree you will now get a BS in Customer Experience? Where is this train headed?
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2014 | 12:54:50 AM
Re: Interesting titles
You have a point. There are many institutions these days offering specialization courses and workshops and to a certain degree, they can be incredibly helpful. But the real "specialization" comes when you're on the job and on the field, where you deal with what you're supposed to deal with on a daily basis and eventually develop and hone those skills in the process.
MDMConsult14
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MDMConsult14,
User Rank: Moderator
7/25/2014 | 4:16:53 AM
Re: Interesting titles
@Henrisha Good point. That's when you can really decipher between the better candidiate. Having highly specialized skills never goes out of date. Especially for technology roles. Being able to adapt those skills to the current marketplace is key.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 10:03:13 AM
Re: Interesting titles
@MDM, not so sure I agree with you on that. If you were a specialist in Novell, you aren't doing that anymore. In programming, pick your poison. You want to do RPG, COBOL, PERL, PHP, Java, Javascript, C#, VB....Well, you get idea.  More important than language is methodology. Many, many programmers from my generation just could not switch from green screen to OOP, GUI and web technologies.

The key is to understand the core of computer science itself. You can then have a fighting chance to pick up new paradigms and technolgies as they emerge. "Specialization" implies just the opposite.

Even these jobs which are not technical, like user interface specialist. When small smartphone screens came out, did their previous work on web page design help? Same with Touch interfaces. You are not a specialist anymore, you are just learning like the rest of us. How well you can adapt is the key and having a wide base to build from gives you best chance to do so.

I remember in college we had class we wrote a compiler for ADA language in PASCAL, course called Comparitive Languages. Not because they ever expected us to do it in the field but so we would understand what ANY compiler does and what every language has to be able to do.
PedroGonzales
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PedroGonzales,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 10:51:41 AM
Re: Interesting titles
@terryB.  I can see where you are going with this.  This is an unnecessary specialization.  Such skills you can learn on the job, there is no need to fragment education even more than what it is now.
Gary_EL
IW Pick
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Gary_EL,
User Rank: Ninja
7/24/2014 | 1:01:35 PM
Actually, a good sign
I take this report to mean that IT is becoming more and more a mainstream occupation. IT people are no longer just developing IT, rather they are applying IT to all phases of the economy. IT expertise is becoming more and more of a must-have staple, no matter what businesss a company is in.
kstaron
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kstaron,
User Rank: Moderator
7/24/2014 | 6:11:00 PM
New IT roles
I'm a little confused about the new IT jobs trending for non IT companies. What exactly is a 'collaborator evangelist'? Sounds like somone singing hyms about working together. Or something you'd find in buzzword bingo. What skills does that position require?

It's good to know the geographic distribution of IT is spreading out. It may affect where we opt to move next time, and the ability to get a job without going to a high cost of living area can be a draw for the right companies. for those of you looking into the job market, does this change anything about where you might look fora new IT job?
Henrisha
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Henrisha,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2014 | 1:24:59 AM
Re: New IT roles
The new positions sound superfluous sometimes, like some HR people feel the need to make up all-new "exotic" sounding positions. Perhaps it's to fluff up an otherwise boring and low-level sounding position.
MDMConsult14
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MDMConsult14,
User Rank: Moderator
7/25/2014 | 4:12:57 AM
Re: New IT roles
There are sectors of IT Tech which are strong. Though I do agree that adding in customer experience and customer services related skills are a benefit to today. Organizations today are being pressured to adapt to the evolving consumer which whom are adapting rapidly to our new technologies. Caterng to personalization is in demand.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 9:48:55 AM
Re: New IT roles
@kstaron, that's one of the few tiltles on this list I actually understand, although I'm shocked some company would actually have a position for only that. This has to be a LARGE company.

Think Sharepoint, Yammer, etc. I implemented Sharepoint here at our local biz unit back in 2007. The Field of Dreams line hardly applies to this. You know, "If you build it, they will come".

Having a tool to use discussion forums instead of email threads, Doc libraries instead of shared network drives and posting announcements on company news page instead of mass email does not mean people will change their habits and use the tool. I very much have had to play that role, and still do. As Corp also implemented Sharepoint, that has evolved where I am now officially heading up the Sharepoint Competency Group for all our biz units globally.

But that sounds more exciting/involved than it really is. That may be 5% of what I really do, I'm still mainly paid for development and ERP support. But at a very large company, I guess I could see this as full time position. Would be boring as hell though.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/25/2014 | 11:25:22 AM
Re: New IT roles
@TerryB, your experience shows your company was able to use you -- learning as you went along -- to oversee Sharepoint efforts, rather than hire a new specialist. Makes sense for employer and employee. You get fresh skills, they get a person who is a known quantity.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 11:46:01 AM
Re: New IT roles
@Laurianne, I'm not sure a specialist would have helped. The technical side of Sharepoint was the easy part, you can Google just about anything you want to know.

The trick here was the integration with the rest of the systems and business isself, figuring out what Sharepoint should be doing and what it should not be doing. And these are not hard fast rules. For example, you can (with Visual Studio/ASP.NET) write entire applications in Sharepoint. But that doesn't mean you should, that it is the best tool for that app. Another decision point was what Sharepoint to use, the free WSS stuff or fork out the dough to buy Enterprise licenses to use all the fancy stuff like KPI web parts and Excel services.

Not being a Sharepoint "specialist" gave me a perspective that someone who lives solely in that world would never have. When you are a hammer, everything looks like a nail. I was able to determine early on that other technologies like Sencha Ext JS are much more robust and maintainable (code wise) to write web apps integrated with line of business data on IBM servers than creating a custom web part app with ASP.NET. You then hang the LINK to Ext JS app in Sharepoint, as far as users know it is Sharepoint. Approaches like that keep Sharepoint vanilla, making upgrades a much easier thing.

The sad thing is, I don't think "collaboration evangelist" has anything to do with that stuff. That sounds like it is strictly about the PR of getting users to adopt to this new paradigm, get away from email. That's why only a huge company could afford to carry a position like that.
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/25/2014 | 11:52:30 AM
Re: New IT roles
"Not being a Sharepoint "specialist" gave me a perspective that someone who lives solely in that world would never have. When you are a hammer, everything looks like a nail." Bingo. Also incredibly valuable.
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Strategist
7/25/2014 | 10:47:52 PM
Re: New IT roles
Sharepoint is the "new way to work together," says Microsoft. Sounds like it's the new way to complicate things. What's wrong with email?
Stratustician
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Stratustician,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 11:50:08 AM
Re: New IT roles
The problem with email becomes evident when you talk to marketing folks.  Constantly sending large files (PowerPoint, PDFs, graphic files) is not a sustainable model.  I can think of many times where I've had to go through my email and delete tons of files just to be able to send a single email with no attachment.  It's simply not a sustainable model, which is why having alternate tools, such as SharePoint are key for many organizations.
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 9:39:10 PM
Re: New IT roles
Not sure why you can't just use a filesharing service like Box or DropBox. Stay nimble, give people the resources they need, and the simplest communication tools --- IM or email -- then get out of their way. Collaboration tools like SharePoint are just a form of buracracy. 
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 1:24:01 PM
Re: New IT roles
@Broadway, I'm going into my evangelist role just for you. First, Sharepoint does much, much more than the world email lives in. You can build an intranet with it, extend it to places where email just doesn't go. Here, we extend it to the shopfloor guys, who have no email. We use Lotus Notes, the fully loaded cost of a Notes license for us is about $700 a year by the time Corp allocates a portion of our global WAN cost back to us. We have about 40 concurrent shopfloor guys. The guys can use Sharepoint to see company announcements and access ISO controlled work instructions.

We've implemented a version of Announcement web part that we call a Whiteboard and I have one on every Home page of every shopfloor workgroup and one associated with every office department. People in office can ask for an Alert on their Whiteboard, when someone posts to it you get an email with the post. This gives us a way to have electronic dialog with shopfloor without them having email.

SP doesn't replace email, it complements it. Email is fine for asking Joe Bob where he wants to go for lunch today. But if you are exchanging info on how to do something in your company, it would have much more leverage if stored in a FAQ Discussion forum for anyone to reference it. Who is ever going to find your private email in future, including probably yourself?

That is where this evangelist role is targeted, getting serial emailers to actually change their behavior and use a FAQ knowledge base to share with the NEXT guy who might be filling job of guy you are emailing.

Even mundane things like company announcements/news. Sure you can create a massive group email list and send it to everyone. Lot of overhead on that versus just posting to company news list and letting people go read it when they are ready. Again, with alerts, they can end up with an email if they choose. But most people are looking to reduce email, Sharepoint and other software like it are a tool to do so.

I'm not even going to go into all the other things Sharepoint can do, KPI metrics, wikis, etc. And I'm just talking about the "free" SP, not the Enterprise licensed stuff which gives you Excel Services and stuff. I did not find sufficient ROI to justify that versus other techniques of doing same thing. Meaning, we don't need to have two people working on same Excel at same time.

But my point is, if you are equating Sharepoint/collaboration to email and DropBox, you have some stuff to learn about it.
Broadway0474
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Broadway0474,
User Rank: Strategist
7/28/2014 | 9:27:37 PM
Re: New IT roles
@TerryB, consider me educated ... or on my way to being educated. Your guess is right that I just haven't been in an environment where SharePoint has been used to its potential. I have been in places where it's been promised ... eventually ... to be used.
jastroff
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jastroff,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 11:31:57 AM
Re: New IT roles
>> 'collaborator evangelist'?
 sounds like a cheerleader
Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 11:44:16 AM
Re: New IT roles
 You gotta love all the buzz words and I have to agree with you it does sound like a cheerleader.  But that is what it takes to create change in an enterprise.  

One other observation I have regarding the post is the number of job postings based on geography. The dark blue with larger populations is a no brainer but some of the others that are light blue are interesting and show a possibility of growth plus a lower cost of living.  If you look at California, lots of jobs which is great but the cost of living is crazy.  I have a meeting this morning with a client that is expanding from North Carolina to the Silicon Valley. The manager is moving here and she told me that her rent doubled to get half the space and add 3 roommates.  Typical rent in SF for a two bedroom apartment can run from 3 - 4,000.00 or more a month.  Tough to survive and might explain why so many companies in the valley offer free food at work, the employees can't afford to eat.  "Will work for Food" Kind of a new example of an old sign.   
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2014 | 10:51:08 AM
Re: New IT roles
Tough to survive and might explain why so many companies in the valley offer free food at work, the employees can't afford to eat.

^^working long hours is likely another reason, too.
Jeff Jerome
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Jeff Jerome,
User Rank: Ninja
7/28/2014 | 11:08:55 PM
Re: New IT roles
@ Kristin - Your comment is absolutely true that people work long hours and it comes donw to a convenience factor.  And it is a tool to keep people in hte office, there is no real reason to leave work, just eat  and keepon working, if yoiu are tiered there is some fresh coffee to keep you going too.  Perks and manipulation, with a reward.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/25/2014 | 11:53:37 AM
Re: New IT roles
That is EXACTLY what is, @jane. This is a people job, about persuasion, not a tech job. That is my biggest surprise that they list this as a IT job.
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Author
7/28/2014 | 10:52:48 AM
Re: New IT roles
We're delving into those new titles this week in a separate story. Stay tuned.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 3:56:34 PM
It's all about the lowest paid workers
Given the on-going Depression 2.0 American economy, as well as the fact that corporate America has continued to outsource, downsize, right-size and otherwise import masses of H1B visa workers in a treasonous effort to drive down wages for American citizens, I find it terribly difficult to believe that there is a "skills shortage."  This has been the traditional rallying cry for companies not wanting to pay fair market wages for the knowledge, skills, abilities & education the industry claims it wants.  And members of Congress, being as completely clueless and tone-deaf as usual to everythng except dollar signs in their bank accounts has been the industry lapdog opening the floodgates into this country for cheap, imported, highly skilled guest workers.   Secondly, the IT industry would do well to actually welcome all those candidates possessing the appropriate skill sets who apply for the alleged vacancies, but as it currently stands, IT in the US is restricted to males under age 25, everyone else not in that demographic is perfunctorily tossed aside. 
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
7/26/2014 | 3:56:35 PM
It's all about the lowest paid workers
Given the on-going Depression 2.0 American economy, as well as the fact that corporate America has continued to outsource, downsize, right-size and otherwise import masses of H1B visa workers in a treasonous effort to drive down wages for American citizens, I find it terribly difficult to believe that there is a "skills shortage."  This has been the traditional rallying cry for companies not wanting to pay fair market wages for the knowledge, skills, abilities & education the industry claims it wants.  And members of Congress, being as completely clueless and tone-deaf as usual to everythng except dollar signs in their bank accounts has been the industry lapdog opening the floodgates into this country for cheap, imported, highly skilled guest workers.   Secondly, the IT industry would do well to actually welcome all those candidates possessing the appropriate skill sets who apply for the alleged vacancies, but as it currently stands, IT in the US is restricted to males under age 25, everyone else not in that demographic is perfunctorily tossed aside. 
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 2:19:11 AM
Employment trends
Thanks for sharing an interesting survey results. It's always good to know about employment trends. Whats a little surprising is that growth in Manufacturing IT jobs is supposed to be higher than Supply Chain IT jobs. Hasn't it been the other way round for last so many years? Am I reading it right in the first place?
nasimson
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nasimson,
User Rank: Strategist
7/27/2014 | 2:23:42 AM
Re: online work at home,
Ed, please have some spam filters in place. Such posts are irritating and distracting.
felixlgriffin
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felixlgriffin,
User Rank: Strategist
7/29/2014 | 12:49:01 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
I found it very refreshing to see a post regarding the state of the IT Industry. I have felt IT is the most important field or industry because of the relevance, (past present and future), of Information Technology. There isn't one industry that doesn't use IT and every industry needs IT. With IT as a foundation, you can make yourself more attractive to employers with the right arsenal of skills. (i.e. Finance, Marketing, Business). I'm a Computer/IT Pro (Network Admin) with Programming and Web Development as well as Marketing and business background. IT isn't going anywhere but business and industry is.. more and more high tech [digital]. It would be in the best interest of anyone, in any field, to put great emphasis on improving their IT skill set. Thanks for sharing Kristin Burnham! Great Post!
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 1:47:17 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
I was telling a friend this weekend, who works at a tech vendor in Silicon Valley, about this survey, and I sensed she was skeptical. Many people can't picture these kind of jobs -- tech in a manufacturing environment -- as cutting edge. I think people who can bridge the two worlds -- the cutting-edge, software-centric mindset of Silicon Valley, with the practical, close-to-the-customer product understanding -- are the winners. 
Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Author
7/29/2014 | 3:34:18 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
The other factor is the continued consolidation of the tech companies via mergers and acquisitions. Cloud-related companies are merging on a daily basis it seems. One company=fewer IT jobs. The manufacturing cos may have gone through their consolidations much earlier.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 1:48:47 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
That would make a great story, Chris. I'd love to hear what Silicon Valley thinks is "cutting edge" these days that really applies to companies that manufacture real things like we do.

Facebook, InstaGram, SnapChat, cloud scaling, big data, Hadoop, etc, etc, etc are not relevant to us. If the new kids on the IT block in Silicon Valley think that is where the action is, more power to them. We'll see if they can stretch their careers from 1985 to now, from mainframes to Sencha Ext JS web 2.0 apps like my generation has.

Those young whipper snappers need to show some respect for their elders, we aren't cavemen. :-) I think the old adage "I've forgotten more than you ever knew" may be very relevant for them.
ChrisMurphy
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ChrisMurphy,
User Rank: Author
7/30/2014 | 1:58:13 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
I can tell you companies like GE definitely see the opportunity of learning from Silicon Valley, TerryB -- and they're actively trying to blend the cultures of the Valley's speed and agile development with the rigor and controls needed in industrial environments. Below is a video clip of GE CIO Jim Fowler discussing this idea at the InformationWeek Conference this spring -- on how GE opened a Silicon Valley office in part to change the culture of the broader GE:

http://www.informationweek.com/strategic-cio/executive-insights-and-innovation/ge-power-and-water-cio-discusses-it-speed-and-agility/v/d-id/1279055
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
7/30/2014 | 2:24:53 PM
RE: Where The IT Jobs Aren't - Tech
That makes sense, Chris. I really wasn't thinking about Agile or methodologies, I was talking about "cutting edge"' technology itself. Agile is about how people work, not technology.
D.M. Romano
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D.M. Romano,
User Rank: Moderator
7/30/2014 | 3:46:02 PM
Differentiation
"In order to compete for jobs, people will have to go much farther to differentiate themselves,"

 

I tend to think a shift in a more blended skillset is proving more valuable nowadays as well. While there is a need to have an "expert" in a given area, that only goes so far with what is being asked of IT professionals nowadays as company's strive to cut expenses and drive up the workload. 
RobBellenfant
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RobBellenfant,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2014 | 12:15:39 AM
Continued Education
IT is always changing, so it's natural for the roles and functions within it to be constantly evolving, too. New technology is making it possible for more industries and companies to explore new methods, which will require new-age IT talent to lead the way. Even for those in traditional IT roles, it is imperative to have continuous education and training to stay current and relevant in the industry. These new "creative" IT roles will just offer new areas that IT pros must add to their training. The real pressure will be on universities and training centers to adapt and evolve their programs to help prepre both current IT pros and the next wave of the workforce for these emerging IT roles.
SunitaT0
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SunitaT0,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 6:10:13 AM
Other sectors
Most of the other sectors are concentrated around power states (with oil, gas, food) and with the recent shift of IT sector jobs (15000 people lost their jobs from the Nokia merger), most of the people will find refuge within the IT sectors of the companies running the power, and hence the sudden growth of other areas except of the Silicon Valley.
zerox203
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zerox203,
User Rank: Ninja
7/31/2014 | 8:58:25 AM
Re: Where the IT Jobs Aren't
Wow, this article was an eye-opener in itself, but I really feel like I have to thank @TerryB for the exhaustive (but not exhausting) overview of the role of social and collaborative tools in a manufacturing environment - and in an enterprise in general! Like he said, taking that from someone who's been in IT since the 80s really puts it into perspective and helps me get a solid grasp on what we're talking about when we say 'changing skillsets'. There are broad cateogies, and then there specific categories -  those distinctions do matter, but what counts the most is learning as you go.

As for the shift in IT jobs, well... there's a lot to say about that, too. I'm not surprised to see my home state of Massachusetts represented on the map, but I might have thought it would have been in the maximum density set. I suppose that's because the graph was by number of jobs, not percentage of jobs or what-have-you. Anyway, I too am surprised at the stark rise in manufacturing jobs - not necessarily the fact that there's a rise, but at the size of it. That's a pretty big leap. No doubt that's do to an increase in other technologies (IoT-type stuff, more smart devices on the floor like TerryB mentions) as well as customer-facing technologies.
2014 US Salary Survey: 10 Stats
2014 US Salary Survey: 10 Stats
InformationWeek surveyed 11,662 IT pros across 30 industries about their pay, benefits, job satisfaction, outsourcing, and more. Some of the results will surprise you.
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InformationWeek Tech Digest September 18, 2014
Enterprise social network success starts and ends with integration. Here's how to finally make collaboration click.
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