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10/10/2006
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Sun, Laszlo Team For Mobile Java-Based Apps

The two companies plan to connect OpenLaszlo's markup language with Java ME to create applications for television set-top boxes, mobile devices, and other consumer appliances.

Sun Microsystems and Laszlo Systems, maker of an open source Web development platform, on Tuesday teamed up to create open source applications for mobile devices. The applications will run on Java ME, which has been deployed on millions of devices worldwide.

Sun and Laszlo say they're actively contributing resources to the new project, code-named Orbit. The project is designed for the OpenLaszlo community, which develops applications based on Laszlo's open source platform. OpenLaszlo uses Ajax-style programming techniques and integrates XML and JavaScript for creating Web applications.

Meanwhile, Java ME--popular for its "write once, run anywhere" compatibility--is designed for devices with limited memory. It employs flexible user interfaces and supports networked and offline applications that can be downloaded.

The two companies plan to connect OpenLaszlo's expressive markup language with Java ME to create applications for television set-top boxes, mobile devices, and other consumer appliances that would give users a richer Internet experience, says Sun.

The first Project Orbit application running on the Java ME platform will be released later this year. The companies didn't specify what this first application would be, but said examples of applications they're working on include animations that can be found in Laszlo's LZPix and Calendar demos, as applied to a mobile environment.

In August, Sun launched a portal site aimed at facilitating discussions about open source Java through forums, news, and blogs. Other open source code releases from Sun are expected to follow Java ME this year and next.

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