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1/24/2006
02:10 PM
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Super Bucks Needed For Super Bowl Tix

A comprehensive search across the Web by FatLens.com found tickets ranging all the way from $1,825 for a single seat to $315,000 for a luxury box.

Super Bowl tickets are considered to be among the hardest tickets in the world to obtain, but as of Tuesday, an online search engine said there are still more than 2,000 tickets still available -- for a price, a very high price.

A comprehensive search across the Web by FatLens.com found some tickets ranging all the way from $1,825 for a single seat to $315,000 for a luxury box.

"The best angle today is to leverage the Internet," said Siva Kumar, president and co-founder of FatLens, in an e-mail. "Everyone in the ticket business can access to the national market via the Internet and, as such, this has become the single best resource to find the best deals.

"Since each participating team receives 17.5 percent of the Super Bowl tickets, both Seattle and Pittsburgh are the prime spots to locate tickets," Kumar said.

One Web site selling tickets for the Feb. 5 game in Detroit is ezticketsearch.com, which says prices have been dropping. A 42-person luxury suite, for instance, that had been listed at $239,519 had dropped to $207,376 Tuesday.

FatLens said the least expensive seats -- in the end zones -- start at $2,500. Another angle for scoring seats is to surf tickets sites in Denver, Boston, Indianapolis and Washington -- cities whose teams lost in the playoffs. The search engine said it displays ticket search results so fans can get a better understanding of the entire market of available tickets. FatLens said prices for the Super Bowl are higher even that tickets for the upcoming Olympics in Italy.

"The ticket market is very dynamic and changes quickly," Kumar said, responding to a question about which sellers currently have the most tickets for sale. "Currently we are seeing the largest number of actual tickets available through AllCityTix and Ticket Liquidators…each with nearly 300 tickets."

Kumar cautioned fans to be on guard against scams, adding that the safest method for purchasing tickets is to work through an authorized ticket seller. He suggested that fans be alert to "odd requests," like measures that call for payment by money order or requests to exchange money before tickets are acquired.

"Scams will usually sound to good to be true," said Kumar. He noted that the National Association of Ticket Brokers has posted a list of common scams on its Web site.

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