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Take A Byte Out Of Cybercrime

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In This Issue:
1. Editor's Note: Take A Byte Out Of Cybercrime
2. Today's Top Story: Google On
    - Google Continues Enterprise Push
    Related Stories
    - Google Nixes Blogging, Web Mail In China
    - Yahoo Vows It's In Search To Win
    - New Search Engine Aims For More Targeted Results
    - Microsoft Adds Internet Research Units: Live Labs, Search Labs
3. Breaking News
    - Sprint Scraps Major IT Outsourcing Deal With IBM
    - RIM Says BlackBerry Work-Around Is Ready If Needed
    - Gartner Bashes Oracle Over Security
    - Researcher Details New Oracle Zero-Day Bug
    - Bots Nearly Triple In 2005
    - Microsoft To Open Some Server Source Code
    - Microsoft Readies Second Anti-Spyware Beta
    - AMD To Demo Quad-Core Processors On Current Server Platform
    - Seven Plead Guilty To Pirating 'Star Wars' Film
    - Lenovo Profit, Growth Fall Short; Execs Promise Cuts
    - CA Intros Central Repository For IT Asset Management
4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web
    - AOL Wins $5M Judgment Against Spammer
    - EU: Microsoft May Still Face Fine Threat
    - Jobs Has A Knack For Getting His Way
5. In Depth: Personal Tech And Reviews
    - Firefox Essentials: 10 Must-Have Extensions
    - Netscape Soups Up Security, Adds RSS Support
    - Review: Google Pack
    - How To Build A 1-Terabyte Desktop PC
    - First Dual-Boot On Intel Mac Contest Draws Crowd
    - Hot Apps: Third-Party Desktop Search Tools Revisited
6. Voice Of Authority
    - Is Unix Dead? I Think I Hear It Laughing...
7. White Papers
    - Two-Factor Authentication
8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek
9. Manage Your Newsletter Subscription

Quote of the day:
"The cost of living is going up, and the chance of living is going down." -- Flip Wilson


1. Editor's Note: Take A Byte Out Of Cybercrime

The following headline speaks volumes: "Cybercrime Feared Three Times More Than Physical Crime." Yikes. That's amazing on the one hand--feared more than physical crime???? How can that be, in this era of constant talk of terrorist attacks, the war in Iraq, and, not to forget, the past 12 months of seemingly one natural disaster after another? Not in recent memory has the physical world seemed so threatening, and we haven't even looked at national crime statistics yet!

But then again, after a little more contemplation, I'm thinking, well, maybe I shouldn't be so surprised. After all, from the criminal standpoint, it's become oh so easy, and so much safer, to attack people through the ether, as opposed to mano a mano. No blood, no pain, and minimal risk to self and liberty--what's not to like?

Speaking of easy street, my guess is even bad guys like to telecommute. Cybercrime is the perfect venue--you don't have to leave your house, never mind your country, to perpetrate a crime. And unless you're technically inept, there's limited likelihood of discovery.

Making it even easier are the careless businesses practically gift-wrapping unencrypted personal data (here's the latest moronic blunder) and the foot-dragging legislators who can't even agree that potential victims of data breaches deserve to be informed.

The bottom line then, for all those consumers who participated in that study--the ones who fear cybercrime more than physical crime--is that they need to get a clue and then devise a safety plan. We're as a big a part of this problem as anyone else, and the bad guys not only know it (why else would phishing be so popular, reaching record highs in late 2005?), but according to IBM's annual "Security Threats And Attack Trends Report," they're more determined than ever to exploit the gullibility of people, to the detriment of both companies and individuals.

"Criminals will continue to leverage users, since in some respects it's so easy to trick them," warns David Mackey, the director of security intelligence at the computer company.

Ouch. That means we're our best defense. We can't rely on the people we do business with, but we can do our part on our own patch of technical turf to help keep the cyberthieves out. That means deploying both technical and commonsense safeguards (don't give out your passwords or open dubious attachments, for example) while also lobbying elected officials to get on the stick and get cracking with some laws that show the government means business.

So get serious and do your part to take a byte out of cybercrime.

Patricia Keefe
pkeefe@cmp.com
www.informationweek.com


2. Today's Top Story: Google On

Google Continues Enterprise Push
Search-engine behemoth unveils more appliances, forges more partnerships, in bid to grow enterprise business.

Related Stories:

Google Nixes Blogging, Web Mail In China
Google launches a version of its search engine in China that acknowledges censorship policies, but does not include Web mail and blogging services.

Yahoo Vows It's In Search To Win
Yahoo blog entry denies CFO's comment that it 's satisfied with second place in the market, insisting, "We're in it to win."

New Search Engine Aims For More Targeted Results
Dumbfind.com offers a two-box search engine approach, combining traditional keywords with topics or categories to better match the searcher's intent.

Microsoft Adds Internet Research Units: Live Labs, Search Labs
The two research units are designed to propel Microsoft in emerging technologies and help it compete against Yahoo and Google.


3. Breaking News

Sprint Scraps Major IT Outsourcing Deal With IBM
Sprint is bringing back work and employees it gave to IBM under a $400 million outsourcing pact and redoing its multibillion-dollar call-center deal with the IT services firm.

RIM Says BlackBerry Work-Around Is Ready If Needed
Following the U.S. Supreme Court's rejection of the case, it appears the BlackBerry patent battle will be resolved in the U.S. District Court system. In the case of an injunction, Research In Motion says it's found a way to let customers keep using their BlackBerrys.

Gartner Bashes Oracle Over Security
Oracle security practices are raising red flags, according to Gartner, which advised administrators to hunker down and protect their database systems.

Researcher Details New Oracle Zero-Day Bug
A longtime critic of Oracle says the bug can be exploited by an attacker to grab complete control of an Oracle database server via a compromised Web server.

Bots Nearly Triple In 2005
Bots increased faster than any other software infection last year, said researchers.

Microsoft To Open Some Server Source Code
Microsoft's move is in reaction to a December 2004 filing by the European Commission charging that the developer had failed to properly document the inner workings of Windows Server for rivals.

Microsoft Readies Second Anti-Spyware Beta
Windows Defender Beta 2 will add support for Outlook, a new interface, and automated updates to the spyware definitions and scanning engine. Where Beta 1 has been available only for Windows XP, Beta 2 will run on other Windows versions.

AMD To Demo Quad-Core Processors On Current Server Platform
Advanced Micro Devices is promising that no platform change will be required to move to its next-generation quad-core processors. And to prove it, AMD plans to demonstrate the technology in the middle of this year.

Seven Plead Guilty To Pirating 'Star Wars' Film
What started with a simple loan of the movie between friends has ended in the possibility of prison sentences for seven Los Angeles "Star Wars" fans.

Lenovo Profit, Growth Fall Short; Execs Promise Cuts
Sluggish sales in Japan, and an effort to grow SMB revenue worldwide, were among the areas that took a bite out of Lenovo's profits, executives said.

CA Intros Central Repository For IT Asset Management
CA has revealed a product suite designed to manage and unify financial oversight of technology assets.

All our latest news

Watch The News Show

In the current episode:

John Soat with "Crime Stories"

Eric Chabrow with "Money Chasing Ideas"

Paul Kapustka with "Technology's Helping Hand"


----- The latest research, polls, and tools -----

Protecting The Corporate Network
Examine the security practices of more than 2,500 U.S. companies in InformationWeek Research's 2005 Global Information Security Survey report. In addition to spotlighting security best practices and near-term investment plans, the study also documents recent security incidents.

Your Chance to Weigh In
Are you challenged in your job? Are you satisfied with your current compensation package? The editors of InformationWeek magazine invite you to participate in our ninth annual National IT Salary Survey.

-----------------------------------------


4. Grab Bag: News You Need From Around The Web

AOL Wins $5M Judgment Against Spammer (AP)
A man who sent billions of junk E-mails hawking online college degrees, sexually explicit Web sites, and "generic Viagra" must pay more than $5 million in penalties to America Online, a federal judge ruled.

EU: Microsoft May Still Face Fine Threat (AP)
Microsoft's new offer to let competitors examine some of the blueprints to its Windows operating system may not end the threat of daily $2.36 million fines in the European Union's antitrust case, an EU spokesman said Thursday.

Jobs Has A Knack For Getting His Way (USA Today)
Over the last few years, Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs has made history by persuading companies to do things differently.


5. In Depth: Personal Tech & Review

Firefox Essentials: 10 Must-Have Extensions
There are some Firefox extensions that are good--and some that are indispensable. Our expert tells why these are the add-ons you can't live without.

Netscape Soups Up Security, Adds RSS Support
America Online on Wednesday unveiled version 8.1 of its struggling Netscape browser. It boasts a new anti-spyware tool, performance improvements, and bug fixes, its makers say.

Review: Google Pack
Google Pack is designed to be a single, easy-to-use package containing a dozen desktop applications for personal productivity, communications, security, and just for fun. How well does it work?

How To Build A 1-Terabyte Desktop PC
There's a new wave of fast, affordable, and super-high-capacity drives. Here's how to make the most of them.

First Dual-Boot On Intel Mac Contest Draws Crowd
A self-professed Mac lover who jump-started a prize award for the first person to figure out how to boot Windows XP on an Intel-based Macintosh is confident that someone will step forward to claim the bounty, now at nearly $6,000.

Hot Apps: Third-Party Desktop Search Tools Revisited
In a world where free desktop search apps abound, are traditional third-party desktop search utilities still worth the cost?


6. Voice Of Authority

Is Unix Dead? I Think I Hear It Laughing...
Is Unix dead? We debated that issue as we worked on this week's cover story, "What's Left Of Unix?" My answer is no, it's not dead. As a matter of fact, I think I hear it laughing on its way to the bank. Charles Babcock explains.


7. White Papers

Two-Factor Authentication: A Total-Cost-Of-Ownership Viewpoint
VeriSign Unified Authentication provides an open, integrated platform for managing all types of two-factor authentication credentials. This white paper focuses on the one-time password authentication solutions and helps IT professionals identify the key components that contribute to their total cost of ownership.


8. Get More Out Of InformationWeek

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