Apple Cheats Tech Workers On Overtime Pay, Lawsuit Claims - InformationWeek
IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // Team Building & Staffing
News
8/5/2008
12:18 PM
50%
50%
RELATED EVENTS
Moving UEBA Beyond the Ground Floor
Sep 20, 2017
This webinar will provide the details you need about UEBA so you can make the decisions on how bes ...Read More>>

Apple Cheats Tech Workers On Overtime Pay, Lawsuit Claims

The attorneys pressing the suit are seeking to include all of Apple's California IT workers, including those who are dispatched to Apple retail stores.

IT workers at Apple are subject to conditions resembling indentured servitude and, in violation of California state law, are denied required overtime pay and meal benefits, a lawsuit filed Monday against the computer maker alleges.

David Walsh, who worked as a network engineer at Apple from 1995 until last year, was routinely forced to work more than 40 hours per week, missed meals, and often had to spend evenings and entire weekends on call without receiving an extra dollar of pay, according to the suit.

During his on-call hours, Walsh "was required to remain on stand-by for the entire night, every night of the week, for the entire week without compensation," contends the suit, which was filed in U.S. District Court for Southern California.

"After working an entire workday on the Friday of the rotation, [Walsh] was required to remain on call twenty-four hours a day from Friday evening until Monday morning, when he would report to the employer's work site for his 'regular' workday without compensation," the complaint continues.

"The technical support calls often came in past 11:00 o'clock at night," disrupting Walsh's sleep, according to the suit.

Walsh's attorneys contend that he, and other Apple IT workers, were purposefully misclassified as management by the company so it could avoid paying them overtime rates that California legally requires for nonmanagement personnel and also to avoid lawsuits.

Apple "intentionally and deliberately created numerous job levels and a multitude of job titles ... to create a roadblock to discovery and class certification for all employees similarly classified as exempt," court papers say.

The attorneys are asking the judge to grant class status to all of Apple's California IT workers, including those who are dispatched to perform support functions at Apple retail stores.

If successful, the suit could cost Apple big bucks. IBM was forced to shell out $65 million in 2006 to settle a similar case brought on behalf of 32,000 tech workers at the company.

Walsh is seeking unspecified damages from Apple. The company has yet to file a formal response to the complaint.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
How Enterprises Are Attacking the IT Security Enterprise
To learn more about what organizations are doing to tackle attacks and threats we surveyed a group of 300 IT and infosec professionals to find out what their biggest IT security challenges are and what they're doing to defend against today's threats. Download the report to see what they're saying.
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
White Papers
Current Issue
IT Strategies to Conquer the Cloud
Chances are your organization is adopting cloud computing in one way or another -- or in multiple ways. Understanding the skills you need and how cloud affects IT operations and networking will help you adapt.
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Sponsored Live Streaming Video
Everything You've Been Told About Mobility Is Wrong
Attend this video symposium with Sean Wisdom, Global Director of Mobility Solutions, and learn about how you can harness powerful new products to mobilize your business potential.
Flash Poll