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7/31/2012
02:40 PM
Venkatesh Rao
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The Enterprise 2.0 Backlog: 100 Ideas

Some of the ideas on this list are quirky, but they'll get your creative juices flowing as you dive into the execution phase of the E2.0 revolution.

51. Assess the value of your company as a software company, ignoring other kinds of assets.

52. Have your chief strategy officer develop and deliver a presentation on what your company would look like if it gets "eaten by software."

53. Construct a map of the long tail of your marketplace and assess whether it's a threat to your business.

54. Get your engineering and marketing teams to run an exercise to figure out a gamified version of your main products or services, no matter how silly the idea sounds.

55. Get your finance department to figure out a radically different pricing model for your products or services, modeled on SaaS/on-demand ideas, no matter what you sell.

56. Hire consultants to run an "outside-in" exercise to figure out as much as possible about your business model and strategy based purely on publicly available information.

57. Create a special taskforce to figure out as much as possible about your main competitor using only public sources of data, and see if you can beat conventional competitive intelligence practices.

58. Run a "secret shopper" type of exercise to do a touchpoint assessment on your sales and post-sales operations.

59. Hire a writer to write a critical, non-hagiographic history of your company and distribute a copy to all employees.

60. Analyze the lowest-wage category of workers and figure out if you can replace it with a mix of automation and a smaller number of high-wage workers.

61. Analyze the highest-wage category of individual contributor workers and figure out if you can replace it with a larger number of lower-wage workers.

62. Figure out which startups you would buy with next year's R&D budget if you shut down your R&D department entirely.

63. Run an exercise to assess the quantity and value of data stocks and data flows in your company, down to the nearest petabyte.

64. Shut down your corporate website for a day and replace it with the message "under maintenance" and an email address for critical inquiries, and see how many emails you get and what people actually ask for. Then figure out if your website actually supplies that information.

65. Create an internal video channel and equip a studio where any employee can create and upload videos to the intranet.

66. Start a harmless but interesting "tracer rumor" and find out how quickly the message propagates to different parts of your company.

67. Convince your board that you should stop providing earnings expectations guidance to analysts, and renegotiate all C-suite packages accordingly.

68. Get your IT department to define a vision of an "Intranet of Things" for your business.

69. Run an internal hackathon based on one of your products or services.

70. Estimate the amount of data living on employee hard drives.

71. Get your employees to join Quora and create a large Q&A base that's useful to the public, based on your company's expertise.

72. Release an interesting internal PowerPoint slide deck on Slideshare that shows off something unique about your internal culture.

73. Do a review of Glassdoor reviews of your company at the next C-level meeting.

74. Design a useful iPhone app related to your company that is not a useless piece of marketing fluff.

75. Create a children's book about your company that convinces the average 5-year-old that your business is useful and valuable to the world.

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Deb Donston-Miller
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Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/31/2012 | 8:41:56 PM
re: The Enterprise 2.0 Backlog: 100 Ideas
Your articles have always been so thought-provoking, as is this list! I agree that companies can and should use this as a test to see how far they have come and as a to-do list for making future Enterprise 2.0 progress. It would be interesting to do a survey to see, in general, how companies are doing.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
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